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Bamber Family Letter: January 5, 1864

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Creator: Unknown [possibly a sister of Mary (Russell) Payne]
Subjects: Civil War, 1861-1865, Women, Health aspects -- Illness
Description: The writer addresses Mary Payne (Russell) and it seems likely the writer is Mary's sibling or sibling-in-law. Based on the woman-centered language and content of the letter, the writer appears to be a woman. (Mary [Russell] Payne had only two siblings according to available records: her brother Albert and sister, Dorcas [Russell] Bolles. Family researchers have speculated that James Russell was another sibling, though conclusive proof is wanting. Since both Albert and Dorcas are mentioned in this letter and the writer is probably a woman, it seems possible that Mary has a heretofore undocumented sibling, or the writer was an unnamed in-law). The writer denounces the South for the rebellion and for slavery. Later, the writer discusses the difficulty of living alone without any family member around to provide care. The writer closes by sending sympathies to Mary, Arnold, Albert, and Diantha, all of whom were battling illness.
Date: January 5, 1864
Format: Image/jpg
Original Format: Document
Resource Identifier: 15 - Writerunknown2sisterNashuaNH18640105_1.jpg
Collection Number: Bamber Family Papers – c.00046
Language: English
Rights Management: Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by Michigan State University and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the University Archives & Historical Collections, Michigan State University.
Contributing Institution: Michigan State University Archives & Historical Collections
Relation: Bamber Family Papers – c.00046
Contributor: MSU Archives and Historical Collections
Bamber Family Letter: January 5, 1864, Page: 1

Bamber Family Letter: January 5, 1864
Bamber Family Letter: January 5, 1864

[Written upside down on top of Scan 1]

Cousin Mary. Please say to Edward
that I have wondered why he did
not answer my letter, I little thought he
was playing, [illegible] to pretty Joan if I

[End]

[Written on left top & side of Scan 1]

had, should have ceased to wonder My regards to him and wife
cousin Ann

[End]

Nashua, N.H. Jan 5th 1864

Dear sister
It is snowing quite fast to day:
and though I am not as well as usual,
I feel like commenceing an answer to
your letter of Nov 15th. I have delayed
writing you on two accounts: I sent
Dorcas your letter as soon as I recieved it
and she did not return it until yesterday,
and I have been hopeing to feel stronger
and better able to write you. I am
confident that I never shall, and thought
it best to commence now With all
your cares. I hope you will not think of
fixing me up a box of goodies. if you
have not allready done so. It was
very childish in me, to wish it; but I
do so long for things that will seem like
home, I should like to have you send
Bamber Family Letter: January 5, 1864, Page: 2

Bamber Family Letter: January 5, 1864
Bamber Family Letter: January 5, 1864

the stockings: because I cannot get them
here. I am glad you are back on the
old place, and hope you will stay there:
for I think that you and Mr Payne are
both getting to old to chang your place of
residence
Were I Mr Payne's sons wife I
dont know whether I should be glad, or
sorry, that he had gone into the army: but
as long as he had gone. I believe I should
want him to stay until I was fifty years old
The draft, passed off quietly her, and the
quota for this district, for the Presidents
last call, is filled. You ask what I think
of the war now, as I always have. That
it will exist: until that which has caused
it is destroyed. A few demagogues of the South
sought to make themselves immortal by
rebeling against one of the best governments
that ever existed. They sought not only to
uphold their own peculiar tottering institution
of (slavery); but meant to oppress the free states
When slavery, ceases to exist the war will
Bamber Family Letter: January 5, 1864, Page: 3

Bamber Family Letter: January 5, 1864
Bamber Family Letter: January 5, 1864

be ended. I believe that the sins of
our nation, which are many, will be
washed away: by the blood of our loyal
husbands, sons and brothers, which is
being spilled, in this; to me, most
righteous cause. You and I may not
live to see the time, but posterity will
bless this war
Now I must lie down.
I have seen Sam's wife only once, since
the baby was born She brought it here
see it
that I might see ^She calls at the store
occasionally; and I hear from her at
other times. She is well, but the babe
has the whooping cough
I often wish that I were near you
that I could see you more frequently
But do not allow myself to dwell
upon it much, since I got over the
parting with you, But it is very hard
not to have some one of my family
with me I sometimes think I can-
not stay here alone, but it only makes
Bamber Family Letter: January 5, 1864, Page: 4

Bamber Family Letter: January 5, 1864
Bamber Family Letter: January 5, 1864

page 4th
me more unhappy, and harder to
take care of you have your children
around you to [attach?] you to your new
home. Sometime; our family circle
will be united again, but it seems to
me a great way off. You and Albert
must see each other often. Poor, brave
brother: How I pity him in his affliction
I fear W Sherwood, is proving himself
the scamp. I thought he was
I sent the letter from brother Sams
widow; to Dorcas as you requested
Did any of you write to her? and what
did you say to her? I wrote to her the
27th of last Nov. but as yet, have recieved
no answer. Yesterday Dorcas sent me
your last letter to her. I am very sorry, that
yourself and husband have suffered so
much from ill health since you were
here, and still more sorry for Diantha
for she is so young And Edward, what
shall I say of him? you write, he is
married to a good girl; I am glad she
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