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Havens Letter: July 1 1864

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Creator: Edwin R. Havens
Subjects: Civil War, 1861-1865
Date: July 1, 1864
Format: Image/jpg
Original Format: Document
Collection Number: LC00016 – Havens Family Papers, Box 1, Folder 24
Language: English
Rights Management: Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by Michigan State University and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the University Archives & Historical Collections, Michigan State University.
Contributing Institution: Michigan State University Archives & Historical Collections
Relation: LC00016 – Havens Family Papers, Box 1, Folder 24
Contributor: MSU Archives and Historical Collections
Havens Letter: July 1 1864, Page: 1

Havens Letter: July 1 1864
Havens Letter: July 1 1864

[Written on the top left hand section of Scan 1]

Write again soon
and beleive me
as ever your
Aff. Brother
Edwin. R Havens

[End]

Near City Point Va
July 1st 1864

Dear Nell
Yours of June 22nd came to hand
two or three days since. and, although I know of
but little to write. I have seated myself with
my paper on my knee to answer it. As you will
perceive by the commencement of my letter we have
again moved. which movement took place the night
before last. We commenced moving at about dark
and marched about five miles during the night.
reaching here about 10 Oclock yesterday forenoon
We are now one mile and a half from City Point
in a southern and eastern direction. I have not
been up to the point yet but understand that
there is a pretty little village there. Gen. Grants
headquarters are said to be there. We can hear
the artillery at Petersburg. which is kept up
continually day and night. Yesterday there was very
heavy cannonading all day. but I do not know
whether any infantry was engaged or not. All last
night one or two big guns were fired at short in
tervals.. The distance from here to Petersburg is said
to be about nine miles. Our cavalry moved off
in that direction yesterday morning. but I do not
know where they are now.

Havens Letter: July 1 1864, Page: 2

Havens Letter: July 1 1864
Havens Letter: July 1 1864

[Written on the top left hand section of Scan 1]

Write again soon
and beleive me
as ever your
Aff. Brother
Edwin. R Havens

[End]

Near City Point Va
July 1st 1864

Dear Nell
Yours of June 22nd came to hand
two or three days since. and, although I know of
but little to write. I have seated myself with
my paper on my knee to answer it. As you will
perceive by the commencement of my letter we have
again moved. which movement took place the night
before last. We commenced moving at about dark
and marched about five miles during the night.
reaching here about 10 Oclock yesterday forenoon
We are now one mile and a half from City Point
in a southern and eastern direction. I have not
been up to the point yet but understand that
there is a pretty little village there. Gen. Grants
headquarters are said to be there. We can hear
the artillery at Petersburg. which is kept up
continually day and night. Yesterday there was very
heavy cannonading all day. but I do not know
whether any infantry was engaged or not. All last
night one or two big guns were fired at short in
tervals.. The distance from here to Petersburg is said
to be about nine miles. Our cavalry moved off
in that direction yesterday morning. but I do not
know where they are now.

Havens Letter: July 1 1864, Page: 3

Havens Letter: July 1 1864
Havens Letter: July 1 1864

saved by the intercession of Pocahontas.
The tree under which Capt Smith lay bound at that
time is still pointed out by old citizens. I saw it at a
distance but had no opportunity of going any closer.
Near Fort Powhattan lay the great iron clad
rebel ram that was taken in the Savannah river
some time ago. It is a formidable looking affair
and is said by those who have seen it at a short
distance to have on board two guns carrying two
hundred pound shells, and two more carrying two
hundred and fifty pound shells.
It is said to be the same vessel bought by the
funds raised from the sale of the silver plate
and ornaments contributed by the ladies of the south
to the Confederate government for this purpose. last
winter.. The country that we have seen on this side
of the river is much better than that on the other
side. It is more level and appears stronger. Between
here and Wind Mill Point it is entirely deserted
but few houses remain standing and those are empty
and defaced by the soldiers. The country is one
vast common. the clearings covered with a heavy
growth of grasses. and berry bushes. We found
excellent opportunities to graze our horses and
fill ourselves with dewberries. or running blackberries
which are repening in large quantities. The high bush
blackberries will soon be ripe and we shall then live
like kings.
Havens Letter: July 1 1864, Page: 4

Havens Letter: July 1 1864
Havens Letter: July 1 1864

Well Nell time flies and each day is now
the anniversary of some, to us, memorable event of the
Maryland and Pennsylvania campaign. One year ago
yesterday the battle of Hanover was fought. the first
action in which three regts of our brigade were ever engaged.
Tomorrow will be the anniversary of the battle of Hunters
town. the next day that of our operations at Gettysburg and
each day of the first half of this month will be the anniversary
of some event of that campaign. I do not know that I
want to see such times again. but I would’nt mind taking
some of the things we used to get at those times.
Some predict that Petersburg will be taken by Sunday
next. I hope such may be the case but shall not
be surprised if it is not so. We get supplies very readily
here and the army will not soon have to fall back
on that account. Although I do not now
think Gen. Grant will take Richmond by the
“Fourth” I am very well satisfied with what he
has done thus far. and wont complain. We receive
Washington papers daily. but they contain nothing
of importance from any part of the country. Hunter
and Sherman furnish no more exciting news than
Gen. Grant does. What the “Dickens” ails you Nell? any
one would think from the tone of your last letter that you
was fast becoming a hater of all mankind. You ought to be
ashamed of yourself. I shall be glad to see you next winter
after we get into winter quarters if you come to stay a little
while. but you must know Nell that it will cost you more
to come down here than you can earn all summer. but come
ahead and I’ll do the best I can to make you comfortable.
You must excuse this awful dirty sheet of paper and for every
thing is all dust and dirt and this is written under a tree with
no sign of a shelter

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