Title

Havens Letter: January 9 1863

Back

Creator: Edwin R. Havens
Subjects: Civil War, 1861-1865
Date: January 9, 1863
Format: Image/jpg
Original Format: Document
Collection Number: LC00016 – Havens Family Papers, Box 1, Folder 6
Language: English
Rights Management: Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by Michigan State University and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the University Archives & Historical Collections, Michigan State University.
Contributing Institution: Michigan State University Archives & Historical Collections
Relation: LC00016 – Havens Family Papers, Box 1, Folder 6
Contributor: MSU Archives and Historical Collections
Havens Letter: January 9 1863 , Page: 1

Havens Letter: January 9 1863
Havens Letter: January 9 1863

No 18th

Lee Barracks, Grand Rapids
January 9th, 1863

Brother Nell
I received by the hand
of Newt your letter on Wednesday morning
and seat myself to answer it. You must
not expect to find this an interesting
letter as there is nothing new here.
Every thing in camp jogs along in the
same old pace with little or no variation.
It is take care of horses one day on guard the
next, then take care of horses, then on guard
again and so it goes. There is either a sergt.
or Corporal from our company on guard
each day and some days both.
For the last two weeks we have furnished
from one to three non commissioned
officers for guard duty each day.
I have been releived from duty as
Segt. of Guard about half an hour.
I have got so used to that kind of duty, that
when I have a good comrade I enjoy
myself at that better than any thing
else.
Havens Letter: January 9 1863 , Page: 2

Havens Letter: January 9 1863
Havens Letter: January 9 1863

Last night I had a jolly good
comrade as Officer of the Guard
and together we enjoyed ourselves tip
top. We made patrols among the sentrys
and bothered them some. Col Mann
attempted to pass out of camp without
the countersign got captured and
brought to the guard house where
we passed him out. I have no doubt
that he enjoyed the joke as hugely
as any of us.
Capt. Walker came back with
Newt Sparks, but stayed only one day
and was then sent back to Detroit on
business for Col. Mann from whence
he will return to Niles to recruit
as long as he is allowed to. Eight or
ten new recruits came back with
him and we have now quite a res
pectably sized company. The most
of the new ones however are “tuff pets”
in every sense of the word. One of them
is a blacksmith named Tom Smith
who used to work with old Bill
[Street?] in Buchanan three years
ago and is worse than he used to
be there if that is possible.
Havens Letter: January 9 1863 , Page: 3

Havens Letter: January 9 1863
Havens Letter: January 9 1863

The weather is quite cold at present
much colder than it has been at any
time before during the winter, but as
yet we have no sleighing. The ground is
frozen hard and the roads are good.
There is just snow enough to whiten
the ground, but it is so cold that it can
not snow more than fifteen minutes
at a time and then stop to warm up
again. We find out quarters comfortable
and that we can keep warm with less
clothing than I should use were I at
home. Our food is the most we have
to complain of. It does not comprise a
very extensive variety of articles and those
of a not superior quality, but still I do
not think I lose any flesh, or spirits
either. One or two milkmen visit the
camp every morning and sell milk at
three cents for a tin cup full, and as
we have a breakfa excellent bread I
generally eat bread and milk for
breakfast. It makes a cheap and plentiful
meal and is more nourishing than salt pork
and poor coffee, although it would take
a good deal of the bread to make a
pound of butter.
Havens Letter: January 9 1863 , Page: 4

Havens Letter: January 9 1863
Havens Letter: January 9 1863

The weather is quite cold at present
much colder than it has been at any
time before during the winter, but as
yet we have no sleighing. The ground is
frozen hard and the roads are good.
There is just snow enough to whiten
the ground, but it is so cold that it can
not snow more than fifteen minutes
at a time and then stop to warm up
again. We find out quarters comfortable
and that we can keep warm with less
clothing than I should use were I at
home. Our food is the most we have
to complain of. It does not comprise a
very extensive variety of articles and those
of a not superior quality, but still I do
not think I lose any flesh, or spirits
either. One or two milkmen visit the
camp every morning and sell milk at
three cents for a tin cup full, and as
we have a breakfa excellent bread I
generally eat bread and milk for
breakfast. It makes a cheap and plentiful
meal and is more nourishing than salt pork
and poor coffee, although it would take
a good deal of the bread to make a
pound of butter.
Contact us with Questions or Comments