Title

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

Back

Creator: Edwin R. Havens
Subjects: Civil War, 1861-1865
Date: 1860-1869
Format: Image/jpg
Original Format: Document
Collection Number: LC00016 – Havens Family Papers, Box 2, Volume 8
Language: English
Rights Management: Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by Michigan State University and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the University Archives & Historical Collections, Michigan State University.
Contributing Institution: Michigan State University Archives & Historical Collections
Relation: LC00016 – Havens Family Papers, Box 2, Volume 8
Contributor: MSU Archives and Historical Collections
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 1

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 2

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

E R Havens
924 Ionia St W
Lansing
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 3

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

Receipts from Capt. Jast Benedict C.S. City Point Va.

Table follows.

Receipts from Capt Jast Benedict C.S.

Table follows.
Horae B. Jewell Letter - July 12, 1862 , Page: 4

Horae B. Jewell Letter - July 12, 1862
<br />
Horae B. Jewell Letter - July 12, 1862

shall understand the ropes which
will be in my favor when the
non-commissioned officers are regularly
appointed. Tell Will to send
me my watch right away as it
is positively necessary that I should
have one when I am on guard.
I did not see [Heath?] & only
went to Louisville.
Excuse the crooked letters for
the floor and table are rickety
& the men are walking & dancing
around so that I can hardly
write at all.
Your affectionate Son
H.B Jewell

P.S. I have written to Charlie
write every week & I will do
the same HBJ
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 4

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

d

Receipts from Capt. Jast. Benedict C.S. City Point Va

Table follows
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 5

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

Receipts from Capt Jas Benedict C.S.

Table follows
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 6

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

Third Cavalry Division. Dr

Table follows
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 7

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

First Brigade 1st Cavalry Division Dr.

Table follows
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 8

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

Second Brigade 1st Cavalry Division Dr

Table follows
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 9

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

Reserve Brigade 1st Cavalry Division Dr

Table follows
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 10

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

Issues to Third Cavalry Division

Table follows
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 12

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

Issues to First Brigade 1st Cavalry Division

Table follows
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 13

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

Issues to Second Brigade 1st Cavalry Division

Table follows
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 14

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

Issues to Reserve Brigade 1st Cavalry Division

Table follows
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 16

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 17

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

a
Issues to Second Brigade. 1st Division Cav.

Table follows
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 18

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

Issues to Reserve Brigade 1st Division Cav. Corps.

Table follows
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 19

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

Issues to 2nd Brig. 1st Cavalry Division

Table follows
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 20

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

Issues to 2nd Brig. 1st Cavalry Division

Table follows
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 21

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

Extra Issues

Table follows
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 22

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

Page 1

Saturday June 24th 1865

In accordance with orders received from
Brig. HdQuarters Reveillie sounded at 2.45. A.M. and
everything was in readiness to move at 5.O’clock A.M. and
after the usual delay. consequent upon breaking camp
the command. consisting of all of our regiment that
could be mounted. two companies of the 1st Mich. (besides
Co “M.” at Brig HdQrts) and a detachment of the 6th
Mich moved out. Gen Stagg. commanded in person. Col.
Briggs., commanded the 7th, Capt Robertson the detach
ment from the 1st. and Capt Rockafellow. that from
the 6th. Although we newly. fledged. Lieuts had been
to the Fort every day since Wednesday or had failed
in our efforts to get mustered.. and the prospect of going
away to Julesburg and very likely beyond. without
first being mustered was far from pleasant. but [Geo.?] Smith
having been detailed as Provost Marshall to Gen Staff. he
laid our case to the Genl and obtained permission
for us to remain. and also gave Smith an order to the
Mustering officer to muster us without delay.. So seven
of us Smith. Clark. Buck. Ferris. [Powles.?] Carpenter
and myself. remained at the Fort. while the regiment
passed on. Dick told us he would be ready for us at
noon and having four hours before us we looked
around for some place to spend them. Fort Leavenworth
furnishes few places for recreation. either for benefit or
amusement and we know of none other than the Billiard
Saloon. At noon we repaired to the office again and
after a short delay. were mustered.. Next came pay.
We went to Maj Ellis’ office but he had gone to dinner
and we did likewise. After dinner we went again
found him in and full of business. but at ½ past
four o’clock we were all paid off. We then decided
to go to Leavenworth City procure some articles
considered necessary. and then overtake the regt during
the night
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 23

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

2

A shower coming up we thought it prudent
to remain at Leavenworth. City. so Smith. Clark. Carpen
ter and myself stabled our horses and engaged rooms
at the Mansion House. Meeting Capt Colerick we went
to the theater and spent the evening. and sought our
room at 11 o’clock giving instructions to call us at 4
oclock tomorrow morning.

Sunday June 25th 1865
Agreeably to instructions we were aroused
at 4 this morning and were soon on our way to overtake
the command.. The morning was a beautiful one
and we enjoyed it highly. At the little village of Salt
Creek we stopped a few moments. Six miles. from
Leavenworth. Carpenter rode on ahead and engaged
breakfast at a little log and frame hut on the
side of the road. Our breakfast consisted of
muddy coffee, cold biscuit fried bacon and fried
eggs. Fourteen miles from Leavenworth we passed
the spot where the command had camped the
night before. and a short distance from there
we overtook the commissary supply train..
We learned here that Hill of Co “C” was killed the
day before by being thrown from his mule and falling
under the fore wheel of his wagon which ran over his
neck killing him instantly. He was buried near their
camp.. At Easton. (15 miles from L__ ) we overtook
Bentley & McNaughton who were waiting for their
train to come up. Halting here a few minutes to
rest our horses and drink a glass of beer. we started
on again. Easton is a small town of perhaps 200.
inhabitants. not very well built and not appearing
very thriving. A few miles farther we overtook the train
belonging to Brig. HdQrtrs and shortly afterwards caught
sight of the column. About 3½ P.M. the command
went into camp near Grasshopper Falls and we
joined them soon afterwards.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 24

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

3

The country. ever since crossing the ridge
and leaving Salt Creek Valley has been prarie. gently
rolling. quite thickly settled and well cultivated crops
looking beautiful.. I am much pleased with the
country thus far. and find that it exceeds anything
I had ever speculated upon as appertaining to Kansas.
Between Easton and Grasshopper Falls there
are several miles of open prarie with the grass green
ing luxuriantly upon them. yet houses are constantly
within sight.. Grasshopper Falls is a very pleasant
appearing village somewhat larger than Easton..
I noticed. as I passed through the town a steam
factory. and machine shop a tavern and stores shoe
shop and blacksmith and wagon shops two churches etc.
Tonight Chaplain Nash preaches at one of the
churches, but very few go to hear him and they go to
[illegible in original] the folks rather than hear the summer sermon.
Several villagers visited our camp during the
afternoon. Many Michigan people are settled in
the vicinity and between here and the river (the
Missouri) The town is built near Grasshopper
Creek. and some falls are said to be near here

Monday June 26th 1865
Reveillie at 3. A:M. moved at 4 A:M. About a mile
from bivouac we crossed Grasshopper creek near the falls.
a pretty little cascade. The water falls over a ledge of rocks
some six feet in highth. reaching from shore to shore in a
slightly circular form. The water is of a light blue color
quite. clear and of a pleasant taste. The country continues
much the same as yesterday; a little timber skirts the
banks of Grasshopper Creek. about the only timber seen
on our march. The houses are more scarce than during
yesterdays march. although some improvements are
to be seen at all times.. We reached Holton. 20 miles
from Grasshopper Falls about 4. P.M. and camped nearly
two miles from town. on a flat near the river. where the
grass is luxuriant.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 25

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

4

Holton is a very small town, consisting of a store, a
grocery. a shoe shop. a tavern. the foundation for a new
store jail and a dozen or more dwelling houses.
In this immediate vicinity are several farms
under good cultivation. and near our camp is a nice
field of corn and another of wheat.. Lieut Canfield and
a
myself went down to the creek for the bath and found
the stream very deep. although warm. A tribe of Indians
who emigrated from Michigan are living on a reserva
tion a few miles from here. and Capt McCormick who stopped
in town saw some of them; He represents them. as dressed
in full Indian costume. the warriors of the tribe are now
absent on a hunt.. Harding of Co "A" deserted last night. taking
horse, equipments and revolvers..
Tuesday 27th June 1865
Had a very heavy rain last night which
completely submerged the whole camp. The line officers
disliking the "lay of the ground" on the bottom last
night took up their quarters at the foot of the hill
on the left flank of the camp and most of them fared
better than the men. who were almost drowned out.
and long before daylight the cries of "no bottom!" "quarters
less [twain?]" "by the mark [illegible in original]" were resounding through
the camp.. Our "fly" resisted the combined attacks
of wind and rain, both of which came with terrific
force. until midnight when it came down upon us.
and when the bugle sounded reveillie. we were wet
to the bone. not a dry thread to be found anywhere
about our bed. The morning was cold and windy
and I was forced to put on my vest for comfort
and do not think I would have found an overcoat
uncomfortable.. Reveillie sounded at daylight and we
took up the march at 6. A..M. An order was read from
Brig. HdQuarters. forbidding the wearing of straw hats
and linen coats. which for some time has been increas
ing 'till it had reached an extent which made it diffi
cult to distinguish a soldier from a citizen: and several
were taken from men in the regiment
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 26

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

5

The detachment from the 1st Michigan came
out this morning. each man wearing a scarlet necktie.
and received a great many jokes from our boys as
they passed us. We marched 13 miles and camped at
11 oclock A.M. on the bank of Soldier's Creek. it being too
high to admit of our crossing at present. There are three
or four houses in the neighborhood and small farms
are under cultivation.. Improvements are growing
more scarce. and farther apart. As the sun rose the
day grew warmer. and finally became hot.

Wednesday June 28th 1865
Reveillie sounded at daylight and we took up the
march at 6½ A.M. morning cool and cloudy.
We marched but seven miles and went into camp about
noon at America on Vermillion Creek. America is a
very small town consisting of a Post Office. store.
blacksmith shop. carriage shop. and half a dozen
dwelling houses. We got a heavy shower about 5.P.M.
lasting about an hour and a half. America is
settled in part by men from Michigan and several
have visited our camp this afternoon. There has
been non perceptible change in the country. all green
beautiful prarie excepting where broken by some
settlers we find plenty of excellent water and along
the streams considerable timber.

Thursday June 29th 1865

Reveillie sounded at daybreak. and "forward"
at 5:30. A:M.. Horses stampeded during the
night and many of them were found three, four,
and five miles from camp. Some cos had but
one horse remaining in camp this morning.
Lieut House sprang from his bed screaming "Indians
Indians." Segt Bellinger climbed a tree.. and Cap
Sergeants [darkey?] Henry. had his face badly cut
by a horse stepping. in it
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 27

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

6

Marched 22 miles today and camped
on the Black Vermillion near Barnett's mills.
at 4:30 P.M. Capt Clark and I took a bath
in a beautiful little baisin near camp.
Day very warm and dusty. the country con
tinuing about the same as usual. Improve
ments near the small streams. and quite
a quantity of timber near the Black Vermillion

Friday, June 30th 1865
Revellie at 2:45 A M and moved at 5. A:M. Marched
leisurely along over a country a little more rolling than hereto
fore. rather more timber and water. to Marysville which place
we reach at 2 O'clock P'M. Went into camp near the
gh
river after crossing the stream and marching throu^ town
unsaddle with the information that we would move
again at 5 O'clock. and Col. Briggs also informed us
that he would muster the regiment at 3. O'clock..
Lieut Canfield and myself went down into the town.
which we found to be quite a flourishing town for the
borders of civilization.. It contains quite a large hotel. four
large general outfitting stores. where may be obtained anything
that one needs in crossing the plains. a tin shop. wagon shop
two or three blacksmith shops. a printing office. where the
"Marysville Enterprise" is issued. a barber shop. school
house and quite a respectable number of dwelling houses.
besides those in which the families of the proprietors
of the business establishments live. for as yet the
merchants and tradesmen of Marysville are not wealthy
or fashionable enough to support two establishments.
We moved at 5: P.M. and after marching four miles went
into camp for the night at a spot where it is impossible
almost to procure sufficient wood and water for cooking
purposes. and we are to move at 4:30 A.M. tomorrow to a
creek. 8 miles from here where we are to halt for breakfast.
The object of leaving the vicinity of Marysville was
to withdraw the men from the vicinity of the beer and
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 28

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

7

liquor saloons. as no restriction was placed upon
the selling of liquors to any one and quite a number
of the men are drunk already. Col. Briggs and Maj
Warner remained at Marysville. and Adjt Pratt. Major
Sproule. Lieuts Crocker. Carpenter & [Bowles?] have gone back
after arriving here. as there is to be a ball at the tavern.
this evening.
Marysville is situated on the Big Blue river. Marshall
county Kansas. on the direct mail route from Fort Leavenworth
to Fort Kearney: We expected to receive a mail on arriv
ing there but none had come and we were disappointed
[De.?]Graff. with a detail of men for guards was left
to wait until it comes tomorrow and then bring it
up. Had a smart shower on reaching camp tonight
Day warm. and clear until we left Marysville.
After leaving Marysville the prarie becomes more level
and apparently larger.

Saturday July 1st 1865
Reveillie sounded at 4 O'clock and we were on the
march at 4:30. promptly. The morning was clear cool
and pleasant and the shower last night having laid the
dust made our march to Cottonwood creek quite a pleasant
one although before the eight miles were fully accomplished
we began to feel a "vacancy" in our stomachs something like
an "aching void.." We unsaddled and remained until ten
o'clock. and again took up our line of march. continuing
the same until we struck the great Pony Express. and
Overland Mail route. at 4 P.M. when we went into
camp. The day increased in heat until it became
really uncomfortable. With the exception of a ranch at
Cottonwood creek no houses were seen during todays march.
The Express or Mail Co. have a barn near here. but this
is the only building we have seen today.. We passed two
freight trains today. and now. a long train of heavy
freight wagons. with their oxen are coming over the
hill from the east.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 29

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

8

Tonight a rumor is in camp that we will soon
overtake a train of mormon emigrants. mostly women.
I can not give full credence to this report. although
I think it possible. as when we left City Point. the
New York papers were filled with stories concerning the
arrival of an emigrant ship filled with mormons. from
England.. and who were to cross the plains. by this
route. yet I do not think they have got so far as
this yet..
The prarie has been today more level and
with more than the usual amount of timber in sight
About a mile north of our camp seems to be a large grove
of timber; the creek here is very small. and the water
warm and unpleasant in taste. with only a small growth
of Cottonwood shrubs on its bank. the grass also shorter
and less plentiful than we have yet seen. It is said by
a few that have travelled this route before that we are
now coming to the "Plains" in earnest. and that
wood. water and feed will not be so plenty as we have
yet found it. Some claim that we have crossed the
line between Kansas and Nebraska. and are now in
the latter territory but I am inclined to dispute
with them. although we are so near the line that it
is difficult to decide.. Marched 20 miles today..

Sunday July 2nd 1865
Reveillie sounded at 4:45. A.M. and were
in line at 6. From 5 O'clock until we left camp.
a large train belonging to the "Ox Express Company"
moved slowly over the hill from the east and passed
us on their way to the west. We soon overtook and
passed them and continued our march to Rock
Creek when we halted to water the horses and rest
awhile. Rock Creek is a stage station where relays
of horses are kept. There is a large stable and a small
log house a part of which is used as a store. where
all sorts of groceries and liquors were sold.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 30

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

9

It is needless to say that the store was soon
filled by our boys who came out with armsfull of
canned fruits. tobacco. crackers. cheese. and liquors of
various kinds In the stable yard a young Elk was
tied. the first specimen of the wild animals of the prarie
we have seen. It appeared quite tame and not in
the least alarmed at the crowd that flocked around it.
It was said to be about a year old. had horns about
six inches long which were covered with a short, fine hair
and looking harmless enough.. We met the stage from
the west. at Rock Creek and a mile or two from there
that from the east passed us.. Near the station was a
corrall of a large number of horses. but for what purpose
they were kept I could not learn. We met some government
trains going East. The country has been more rolling today
with more timber. Reached Big Sandy at 4:15 P.M. and
went into camp on the bank of the creek between the
stage station and town. Are now 54 miles from Marys-
ville and 110 miles from Fort Kearney.. One or two houses
along the route, one at Little Sandy a short distance back
from here. called a hotel. Big Sandy is composed of
a Post Office. Store and two or three dwellings. besides
the tavern and stage station at the creek a mile from
the town. The creek is about six rods wide. not deep
with a fine sandy bottom: the water like all other streams
we have seen is light colored warm. and sweet in taste.
Quite a border of timber skirts its bank. composed. of Cotton
wood. cedar. Oak. and a few other kinds of wood.. Capt Clark
and I took an excellent bath.. Capt M.Cormick and
Lieut Canfield tried to catch some fish, but did not succeed
in taking any larger than a common minnow..
In consideration of the great amount of straggling
that has been going on so long among both men and
officers. Col Briggs. laid down a system of regulations
for the marching hereafter that is strictly adhered to will
reduce the practice amazingly. Weather quite warm with
the appearance of rain at sunset. country more rolling with
more timber in sight..
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 31

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

10

Monday July 3d 1865
Reveillie sounded at 4:45. A:M. Moved from
camp at 7 A.M through a country very level. and
with very poor grazing and scarce of water for 20 miles
when we reached the Little Blue. and went into camp at
2:30 P.M. Not a house along the route after leaving
Big Sandy. except the intermediate "station".. and all
that we could see that looked like civilization along the
route were the great freight trains moving lazily along.
We have seen but very few emigrants along the route as
yet.. Col Briggs on coming into camp. established a line
by placing the company quidons on the right flank of the
regiment and directed the officers to place their tents
on that line. also ordered a company inspection at
retreat.. Received notice that we would remain
here until the morning of the 5th.. Little Blue is
wider and more rapid than the Big Sandy. deeper.
the water of a very dark, blue color. sweat. warm. and
unpleasant in taste. A very fine spring of cool water
was found just across the creek. Capt. Clark and myself
took a bath tonight..

Tuesday July 4th 1865
At 8 O'clock A.M. a gill of whiskey was issued
to each man in camp. by order of Gen. Stagg.. and
orders issued to have the men wash their clothes. and
cook their rations, as wood will be scarce. before
reaching Fort Kearney. Clark. House. and myself. went
up to the ranch this morning and spent a part of the
day there; we did intend going to Kioway Station but
learning there was nothing to be had there and that it
would be only a ride of 14 miles for nothing..
A mail arrived today but brought nothing
for me. Wrote a letter to Nell this afternoon..
A new man of Co "A" Edgar. A Clark. while putting
his carbine into his tent accidentally discharged it the
ball passing through his left side.

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 32

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865


11

He had just come in from picket and had
left a cartridge in the barrel. and was down upon his
hands and knees when wounded.
The day has been very warm.. Col Briggs. Capt.
Tubbs C.S. Lieut Stagg. A.A.A.G. Capt Ballard and Dr. Smith
went back to Big Sandy to ball to night. Capt Fisher got
into row with men of 1st Mich. who ran him into the creek.
All were "considerably inebriated"

Wednesday July 5th 1865.
Our march today was along the banks of the Little
Blue, during the entire day. marched a distance of 28 miles.
Clark of Co. A started in the ambulance but died on
the march and was buried near Liberty Farm. where we
halted an hour or two for rest.. The country along the river is
very rolling yet I presume that back from the banks it
is quite level.. feed is very poor. and no timber except very
close to the river bank. Passed Kioway Station. Deserted
Ranch. and one other before leaving reaching Liberty Farm..
Soldiers, both cavalry and infantry are stationed at all
stations to defend the station guard horses. and escort the
stages from one station to another: A company of each
was stationed at Liberty Farm. Reveillie sounded at
3 o'clock A:M. and we left camp at 5. oclock. Day very
warm. windy and dusty. making the march very unpleasant.


Thursday July 6th 1865
Reveillie sounded this morning at 3 Oclock and
we left camp at 5:30. marched to Buffalo Station and
went into camp: having marched something more than
twenty miles. After marching about 12 miles we left the
banks of the Little Blue and kept some two miles
or more from it until reaching Buffalo Ranch when
we marched back to the river and camped in a beautiful
little meadow where the grass was luxurious and wood
and water plenty
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 33

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

12

As we were passing the ranch at Buffalo. the
stage from Ft Kearney arrived and a large mail
bag well filled was handed to Col. Briggs and in
a couple of hours after getting into camp almost
every one was busily engaged in reading letters..
I received two, dated June 25th
The country through which we have been marching
today has been quite level the grass very poor. with no
timber and water very scarce. Had a small shower
after reaching camp..


Friday July 7th 1865
To night we are bivouacked on the bank
of the Platte river ten miles below Fort Kearney
having marched 22 miles today. Reveillie sounded
at 3 this morning and we marched from camp at
5. O'clock. The country was quite level until we came
within three miles of the river where we struck the
low range of hills that is said to skirt the walls
of the Platte almost the entire length of its course.
These hills at this point. and in fact so far
as we can see them. are three or four miles from
the river leaving a level valley that extends to the
banks of the river which are low sandy and entirely
destitute of timber. We took a bath to night and found
the water warm. and rather muddy; the stream is
here about 15 rods in width. and at the point where
[were?] of an average depth of 5 feet with a very
strong and swift current. that I found it
utterly impossible to make any headway against.
On coming into camp some of the boys saw indications
of water near by and on digging soon struck an excellent
spring of cool water. slightly sulphury. but much
better than any other that we could find..
At the foot of the hills on this side was a stage
station called Adobe Station. for the reason I sup
pose that stables and houses were built of adobe.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 34

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

13

I had always supposed that "adobe" was a
name given to buildings of clay or sundried brick. but
these buildings are constructed of the sod cut from
the prarie. A few soldiers were stationed there and
some rude fortifications of "Adobe" were thrown up..
Day very warm and sultry and all suffered slightly
of thirst. as we marched ten miles without a brook. spring
or well.. No timber anywhere along the route.



Saturday July 8th 1865
Reveillie sounded at 3 A M. and at 5 we were off
again and reached Fort Kearney at 10.O'clock where we went
into camp with orders to be ready to move at 4. P.M.
Immediately after reaching camp I started for the fort
to procure some articles wanted for the mess. consisting of
Bake Oven. Crackers. etc. all of which I found at a Sutlers Store.
I purchased these and several other articles that I needed or fancied
and then decided to see the place. I fell in with Capts
Sergeant & Fisher and Lieut Bentley.. We then went over to the Hd Quarters.
which was situated on one side of a square. the three other sides were
filled by commissary. quartermaster's and ordnance buildings
quarters for officers and barracks for men. All of these
were frame buildings; there were also several other buildings
of logs and adobe. in which were situated the post Office
and News Depot. a beer saloon. work shops. and eating
houses. The garrison is composed of a small number
of cavalry and infantry. I saw. none wearing an
artillery uniform. although I saw several pieces of
light artillery. Among the soldiers I saw three or four
Pawnee Indians. on their little ponies.. They are a good
stout looking set of men. medium hight. dark very dark
copper colored skin. rather more fleshy than other Indians
I have seen and giving one an idea of muscle that
is seldom met with..
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 35

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

14

After wandering around from Office to Store
house and back the Capts finally accomplished their
business and we started for camp. stopping by the way
at the Stage Station for dinner and fared sumptuously
on boiled beef and [potpie tea.?] and boiled [trans.?] bread and butter
and stewed blackberries with pie. all for the moderate cost
of $1.25 each. We returned to camp, found the order to
move at 4 P.M. countermanded lay down and took a
nap then wrote letters until dark.. All expected to get
mail here but all are disappointed.. Bentley drew
40,000 rounds of pistol ammunition tonight also drew
grain which we need sadly. there being no feed here. The
day has been very warm. with small showers after sundown..


Sunday July 9th 1865
Resumed the march this morning. reveillie sounding
at 3 A.M and marching at 7 A.M. after marching 17 miles
the command halted unsaddled and remained until 4 P.M.
then marched six miles and went into camp for the night.
We understand that this is to be our mode of march
ing hereafter and almost every one takes advantage of this
as offering an opportunity of finding fault with Gen.
Stagg. Kearney City two miles above the Fort proved to
be more of a town than I imagined containing 75 or a
hundred inhabitants. with one or two stores. blacksmith
shop. "hotel" Saloon. Barbershop and other buildings..
Near there was a small train of emigrants who had
halted from fear of Indians. Another train of six or
eight families who had a drove of several hundred
head of cattle. bound for Oregon. were passed a short
distance above there.. We passed the skeletons of several
buffaloes today. the first one I saw lying just above
Kearney City and others lying at intervals along the
route. Had two slight showers during day. which
has been cool and pleasant for marching.
Country a low. level valley without timber or water.
and nearly 5 miles wide.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 36

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865


15

Monday July 10th 1865

Reveillie sounded this morning at the usual hour
(3A.M) but did not leave camp until 7. o'clock. then
marched until half past twelve. halted. undsaddled. got
dinner and resumed the march shortly after 4 P.M. and
went into camp for the night at 6. P.M. having made
a march of 22 miles during the day. About 11 o'clock we
passed Plum Creek station or ranch. which was 36 miles
from Fort Kearney. The day has been cold. cloudy and
a slight drizzling rain made it very unpleasant marching.
The country is similar to that through which we
marched yesterday and the marched almost totally devoid
of incident. exciting interest. Just before going into camp Sergt
Carl of Co L. killed a rattlesnake. with nine rattles. "Tip"
Knight of Co "A" killed one also. with fourteen rattles..



Tuesday July 11th 1865.

Todays march has been without interest or incident.
day clear cool and pleasant. Reveillie sounded at 4. A M. moved
at 6:15 marched 'till 11:30. halted and remained until 4: P.M.
and then marched until 7. P.M. when we went into camp for
the night.. Tonight we are 27 miles from Cottonwood springs
making 70 miles that we have marched since Sunday
morning. The day has been cool. clear and pleasant. making
the march quite agreeable. The country continues level. as
it has been since leaving Fort Kearney: good feed in
abundance. but no wood.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 37

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

16

Wednesday July 12th 1865
Tonight we are encamped near Cottonwood
Springs which proves to be quite an interesting little village
or post for this vast wilderness of praries. It is situated
just under a bluff of medium highth. and some half
a mile from the banks of the Platte and boasts of a
brewery and bakery, two stores. a blacksmith shop. and
two or three dwelling houses. A considerable garrison
is also stationed here. quartered in good barracks. their
camp enclosed by a good strong palisade.. Unlike the
other houses of this country the buildings here are not
of adobe but of good. logs. some of them hewn and
laid up with excellent care. and covered with the peculiar
a cement
of roofing of this country which seems to be ^ composed
of gravel. sand and [limd?]..
The day has been clear warm and pleasant. country
usually level. and there is a little more timber than usual
just here. Mike. [illegible in original] horse was bitten by a rattlesnake
today but by proper care it is thought he will recover..
Drew grain for horses tonight. Expected to get mail tonight.
but were disappointed Reveillie sounded at 4 A:M. and
the days march performed in the usual manner. March
from camp at 6 A.M. go 19 miles and halt 'till 3. P.M.
then continue till we reach camp.. the main part
of the 6th passed through here on Monday. and Capt.
Rockafellow's detachment yesterday.. It is said the
6th marches in a straggling column. and do not conduct
themselves always in the most proper manner..

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 38

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865


17

Thursday July 13th 1865

We have marched 30. miles today having started
from Cottonwood Springs at 6 o'clock. A.M. at 11 A.M. we
halted went into camp and remained until 4 P.M. then
march until 7. P.M. and go into camp for night..
The day has been very warm and dusty. country usually
level with. perhaps. a trifle more timber than we have been
accustomed to since leaving the Little Blue. "Buffalo
Chips" are now looked after and secured as readily
as wood. and when dry. make a very good fire.
Feed continues very good..



Friday July. 14th 1865

Reveillie sounded at 3.30. this morning. and
at 5:30 we started from camp. marched until 10.A.M.
when we halted. went into camp. and received orders
to make ourselves comfortable. as we would remain
until tomorrow. morning.. After pitching tent. Capt
Clark and Canfield proposed a game of cribbage
and as we could find no cards I started for a
ranch, half a mile off to procure some. and after
returning to camp and making a cribbage board
we played cribbage nearly all the afternoon.
After "retreat" Frank Clark. and Lieut House
ran a horse race. which had been brewing for
several days. The terms were 60. rods. ten dollars
a side. the winning man to stand treat for
all hands. House, poor fellow, was the fortunate
winner of the race. and paid the treats for
some 12 or 15. of us. and after buying a bottle
e
for his judge. Capt Serg^ant. found himself
destitute of the ten dollars he had won and
one dollar besides.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 39

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

18

is
The ranch was called Fort Union or O Fallons
Bluffs. A garrison of one hundred men is stationed here. with
a good sutler besides the usual store at all these ranches.
Three or four ladies are here also. one or two of them quite
good looking. The day has been a very warm one
and finding a good camping ground we were
not sorry to hear the orders to remain over night.


Saturday July 15th 1865

Reveillie was blown at 3:30 this morning "to horse"
at 5:30. and at 6. we moved off. Leaving the bank of
the river we passed through some high sandy bluffs
for, perhaps, a mile when we struck the bank of the
South Fork. which we have followed during the day..
After marching sixteen miles we went into camp at
eleven o'clock and remained until 2:30. P.M. after
which we march nine miles and go into camp for
night. We have found the country unusually rolling.
with a plenty of good feed. but no timber. and "Buffalo
Chips" are our only fuel. The day has been very warm
until sundown. when the wind changed to the East and
suddenly grew very cold. and threatening rain.


Sunday July 16th 1865
At 3 o'clock we turned out. expecting to move
at 5. o'clock but soon after "Roll Call" it commenced
raining and Gen. Stagg was considerate enough to
allow us to enjoy the shelter of our tents until it
ceased raining.. At 8 o'clock the storm having spent
its fury we left camp and without halting for
our usual "nooning" marched twenty five miles
and camped for the night near Star Ranch at
the "Old California Crossing".
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 40

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

19

The day proved a very cold one. and was
more disagreeable on account of a drizzling rain
which continued all day. At dusk Frank Clark
and I went over to the ranch where we found the
colonel and several other officers. Shafer. Frank and
myself spent the evening with Lieut Swain "7th" Iowa
Cavalry whom we found to be a very interesting
gentlemanly young man. and passed the evening
very pleasantly.


Monday July 17th 1865

At 3:30. P.M. we reached Julesburg after a cold disagreeable
uncomfortable march. and went into camp near the bank of the
stream under interesting. if not enticing circumstances. A very cold
wind was coming from the northeast. and a slight drizzling rain
that had been raging all day increased to a severe shower and
the wind making it very difficult to put up our "Fly" we just
barely escaped a good wetting. while some others were less
fortunate. Not a stick of wood was to be seen and buffalo
chips were scarce as "hen's teeth" and wet and green after we
got them.. But after the storm ceased Shealey managed to get
us a little supper and we are comfortable and quite contented.
A small mail awaited us here. from which they
for
managed to extract two letters from me. one from Nell.
dated July 2nd and one from Ed. Cooke. dated June 28th
These were a source of some small comfort amid the rest
of our discomforts.. This evening Frank. who went ahead
with Lieut Swain. this morning and reached here at 11 a:m
came to our shanty and he and I went up to the town
and called on Swain. I also made the acquaintance of
Lieut Hayward of the 7th Iowa. and passed the evening
very pleasantly.. Reveillie sounded this morning. at 3:30
and at 5:30 we were on the march. Gen. Stagg took
a small escort and came on in advance leaving Col Briggs
in Command. The 6th left here this morning enroute to
Fort Laramie

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 41

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

19 20

Tuesday July 18th 1865

Remained in camp all day awaiting orders from
Gen. Connor. Estimates for clothing were sent in and
clothing drawn. Another mail was received by the coach
which arrived during last night but brought no letter letters
for me. Weather a little more moderate and clear. spent the
day in writing letters chiefly.. About noon Private Jones
of Co. "E" accidentally shot off one of his toes with a
revolver which he was cleaning.
Visited the town by daylight and find nothing
more than a military post garrisoned by detachment
of seven different regiments. and among them a detach
ment of "galvanized yankees".. The town consists of a ranch
containing a store and the Post Office. and Telegraph office. a
blacksmith shop. three adobe buildings used as quarters for
men and officers. a store house and stage station. Julesburg
formerly stood half a mile below here but was burned
down by the Indians. a year ago. At that time it consisted
of a ranch. store. blacksmith shops, Post Office and Telegraph
Office.


Wednesday July 19th 1865
Remained in camp at Julesburg. until 1 P.M.
then marched ten miles and went into camp for night
This morning Gen. Stagg disbanded his headquarters
and ordered all officers and men to their commands
He, with a portion of his escort belonging to the 6th including
Lieuts Gould and Johnson go to Fort Laramie while our
regiment and the 3 companies of the First under command
of Col. Briggs are to proceed to Camp Collins. 70 miles
north east of Denver City. an arrangement that proves quite
satisfactoryily to all concerned. Just before leaving camp
at Julesburg. Private Harvey of "C" Co. while loading
his "Spencer" by dropping the cartridges into the chamber
was dangerously wounded by the exploding of some of the
cartridges.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 42

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

21

He was resting the muzzle of the piece on the ground
near his right foot. the breech resting against, or very
close to his right side when the explosion occurred
the load taking effect in his side just below the
ribs and passing upwards towards the shoulder.
Dr. Richards extracted five balls from the wound
but expressed the opinion that with good care he might
recover. He was left at Julesburg.. Hoag who has been
unwell for several days was also left there.



Thursday July 20th 1865

Todays march was without interest or incident.
Reveillie at 3:15 A.M. march from bivouac at 6. A M.
and go into camp at 1:15. P.M. having marched 23 miles.
It rained very hard all the afternoon. Received mail for which
the carrier was left at Julesburg.. It contained nothing for
me. Our squadron marched in rear of wagon train.. The roads
very rough. bluffs extending down very close to river bank in
places. Passed one bluff. of clay in which a great many
travellers had carved their names and the date. I saw none
that I knew however.


Friday July 21st 1865

Soon after leaving camp this morning I obtained
permission from Major Darling for Frank and myself to
go hunting. so taking Geo. Vosburgh and Williamson of
"H" Co. we started out. Vosburgh and Williamson were
armed with Spencers' and revolvers. but Frank and
I thinking the chances very slight for seeing any game
larger than a "Jack rabbitt" did not take anything but
our revolvers.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 43

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

22

Soon after leaving the column we scared up a big
rabbitt who gave us an excellent chance for a shot but George
not having his carbine loaded. and I waiting for him to
load missed a most excellent shot.. Our idea was to go
back to the bluffs some 3 miles from the river and
then keep on the flanks of the column. but after reaching
them we discovered that there was no game there or
any where in sight and after wandering around. scaring
up another rabbitt we began to talk of going back when
we met an infantry man who told us that we could
find plenty of Antelopes some five or six miles farther inland.
and not wishing to return to the column without having
at least seen something to tell of. we struck out towards
a high butte or bluff. apparently four or five miles distant.
We passed over slight hills. through small. green valleys covered
with a luxuriant growth of "buffalo grass" wild sunflowers.
Daisies pinks. roses. and many other kinds of flowers, small
shrubs etc. making a most beautiful scene. No small streams
or water of any kind was to be seen anywhere. and we
had passed our mark nearly a mile before any living
animal was in sight. when Williamson ascending a slight
eminence and looking into the valley beyond. signalled us
that he saw something. Advancing carefully we soon caught
sight of a fine antelope who was feeding by himself when
first seen. but who had now "snuffed danger in the breeze."
and stood with head and ears erect watching us as we en
deavored to get cautiously within range of him; but soon
deciding that we were there for no good purposes. he bounded
away from us with the speed of the wind and as light as
a feather and we could see him for miles as he bounded
leisurely for the prarie. Encouraged by this we decided
to ascent a high peak half a mile farther inward
and on reaching its top were struck with admiration at
the sight presented to our view: at our feet and stretching
away directly in front of us was a small valley almost
circular in form and half a mile in diameter covered with
grass and flowers in luxuriant abundance. and scampering
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 44

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

23

hither and thither were several small droves of antelopes.
We remained in this valley an hour chasing them
just in one direction then another. but like all novices
failing to obtain any prey. Soon after crossing the hill or
ridge I lost sight of Frank and as he was absent for
nearly an hour I began to fear that we would lose him.
and commenced to look for him. I soon spied an object
away on the prarie miles away and soon discovered it to be
some one on horseback and concluded that of course it
must be him. In an hour or more all together again.
and. concluding we had seen enough to convince us that
game was plenty and easily procured by good hunters
we turned towards the river. As we ascended each swell
we could see the antelopes bounding away from us in every
direction. We reached the camp of the regiment near Fort
Moore at 3. P.M. they having marched 20 miles. Fort Moore
or Moore's Ranch as it is more properly called. consists of
a stage station and ranch. the nicest built adobe shanty
I have seen along the road since leaving Fort Kearney. Day
cool and cloudy.


Saturday July 22nd 1865.

A rain storm [prevented?] our morning at the usual hour
this morning although reveillie sounded at day light.
At nine oclock the command marched from camp.
halted at 3.P.M. and camped for the night near American
Ranch having marched 23 miles.. The day proved very
cold and the march was made without incident of
interest. A heavy shower came on after we got snugly
into camp. I wonder if we are to have such weather
as this forever..
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 45

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

24

Sunday July 23rd 1865

Marched 25 miles today and camped four miles
from Junction Station where Col. Briggs is to report by
telegraph to Col somebody at Denver City for orders..
The country today has been unusually level, the bottoms stretching
away four or five miles to the hills. on either side of the river.
A range of the Rocky Mountains with one high snow topped
peak have been visible in the distance a part of the day.
Some claim that they are the Black Hills and Long's Peak
The day has been clear and very warm. presenting a great
contrast to the weather of the preceding week. This afternoon
Capt's Clark and McCormick. Lieut Canfield and myself took a
bath. found the Platte as deep and rapid as ever.
A soldier named Clark of the 1st Colorado Cavalry. formerly
from St Joseph Mich. came down from the Junction to visit
some of the boys of Co "B"


Monday July 24th 1865

Reveillie sounded at 3 o'clock this morning and we
were again under weigh at 6:15. A.M. and went into camp
again at 12:45 P.M. having marched 24 miles.
At Junction Ranch we left the O. L. Stage route and
followed the bank of the South Platte over an old trail that
looks as though it had been long unused. the Stage route
from Junction makes a cut off to Denver City and is said
to pass over a breadth of 40 miles where no water can be
obtained yet I saw. emigrant and freight trains take that route
that have marched near us ever since we left Fort Kearney.
Tonight we are encamped on a beautiful little bottom. thickly
covered with timber, the first we have camped near for 7 days.
A couple of miles below here we passed Fremonts Orchard
a group of short. crooked. gnarled oak trees which travelers
have denuded of branches and limbs for wood.
Major Darling gave orders for inspection of arms at sunset
roll. call which was duly attended to..
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 46

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865


25

The mountains seen yesterday were more clearly
visible today. their outline more distinct against the clouds
By reference to the map we find them to be the Meridian
Bow range. and the highest peak to be Long's Peak. as we
supposed yesterday..


Tuesday July 25th 1865

Leave camp this morning at 6:12. and march until
3.30 P.M. go into camp 3 miles below. Carey and Holman's
ferry. Day warm but cloudy. Soon after leaving camp this
morning we crossed the hill near camp and met two four
mule teams. I asked one of the drivers how far they had
come. and he answered. ""Ker Shlape" "Fort Scott." I was puzzled
for a long time to conceive what he meant by "kershlape" but
finally decided it must be "Cache le Poudre." so now
I shall know how to pronounce the name of said creek
when I reach it and not annoy the natives by pronoun
cing. "Catch le Ponder" A mile back we passed a ranch
near which were two Indian wigwams or Lodges filled
with squaws and Papooses.. George and Jim never saw
any "Redskins" before and it is amusing to hear
their conversation about them. Marched over 30 miles
today. Mountains growing more plainly into sight.
Timber more plenty.

Wednesday July 26th 1865
At. six oclock this morning we left our last night's encampment.
and in a very short time reached Carey and Holman's Ferry. The
train was crossed in the boats. and we had expected before reaching
then that the cavalry would cross in the same manner. We had
been told there was a ford some three miles above the ferry
but on account of its uncertainty the Col. would not try to
make a crossing at that point But on reaching the
river we found there was a ford only a short distance
above the ferry and there we crossed. affording us a
good deal of amusement and no small amount of wet
clothes
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 47

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

26

Co. Briggs was the first to cross at the head
of the column and went safely over with the exception
of a wetting. The 1st Mich Detachment followed some
of whom went over very well. others had horses flounder
got ducked and had bad luck generally. Some of our
regiments met a like fate. Lieut Maston got nicely ducked
and others shared the same fate. As good fortune would
have it I escaped with only wet feet. We went into camp
to await the crossing of the train which was completed about
noon. At 3 o'clock we saddled up again and after a
march of 8 miles went into camp on the "Cache Le Poudre" in
a small bottom affording excellent pasturage.. The day has
been very warm and the country the best I have seen since
leaving Kansas.


Thursday July 27th 1865
A march of 18 very long miles brought us to Fort
Collins at 3 o'clock this afternoon. The day has been very warm
until soon after going into camp when it suddenly turns
quite cold with a smart little hail storm which lasts but
a short time however.. The country along the banks of this
creek is beautiful and a great many ranches are establish
on its bank. Near where we camped last night a man
owning a ranch had 160 acres of grain on the ground.
Wheat is not yet ripe. Wages are said to be 50 dollars
a month and board.. Produce commands good prices.
The Cache Le Poudre is the most beautiful stream I have
seen in a long time and every one praises it highly.
It is very crooked. with an average width of about
four rods. a nice sandy. or gravelly bottom. the water
cold and clear as crystal. presenting a very strong
contrast to the muddy waters of the Platte and its
South Fork.. We passed near an Indian village of
some ten or fifteen lodges and at a train near by saw
half a dozen or more half naked squaws.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 48

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

27

Fort Collins is a small military post on the
right bank of the Cache Le Poudre. consisting of barracks
for troops quarters for Officers etc. One Company of Colorado
Cavalry is now on garrison duty here. Two small brass mountain
howitzers are the only artillery here and they look most insig
nificant indeed with their small carriages. and one horse
cart. caissons. It is expected that this is to be the head
quarters of our regiment and that the companies will be
detached and stationed at the several stations along the Overland
Stage line between here and Salt Lake City. All greatly
disappointed at there being no mail here. for us..


Friday July 28th 1865
This morning we began to hear vague rumors about the
dispositions to be made of us. Capt. McCormick claimed
to have learned the disposition and placed Maj Warner at
this place. Maj Darling at Fort Halleck. and Maj Sproule
at Sulphur Springs. beyond Fort Halleck.. but it was
thought no movement would be made to day.. After break
fast I went to work for Capt Loomis on his papers
and continued until 10 oclock when orders were received
for Cos "B." "C." "E." "I." and “L.” to pack up and report to Maj
Norton commanding Fort Collins. At 3. P.M. all was in
readiness for our final disposition when it was found that
Cos "E." and “L.” would remain at Fort Collins. Co "I" would
be stationed at the first stations above there and the
others take stations coming after Lieut Canfield of Co.
"E." was placed in command of Co. "B." and accompanied
Major Warner who is to have his head quarters at
Coopers Creek. Two Cos ("A" & "M") of the 1st were also
placed under Major Warner's.. At La. Porte. 3 miles
above Fort Collins we left Sergt. Hardy and 13 men.
then marched 10 miles farther to Parke. Station. and
went into camp at dusk..
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 49

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

28

Saturday July 29th 1865

This morning we left Sergt Keith at Park Station with
12 men leaving only Sergts Hastings and Monaghan and
Privates Shealey and Wagner to go with Capt. Clark and
myself. For about three miles from Parke. the road
ran near the base of the mountains and then entering
a Canõn proceeded to pass through or rather into the very
heart of the mountains winding around bluffs and climb
ing up through other canõns and over hills or through some
level valleys. Twelve miles from Parke we reached Stone
wall station situated in a hollow surrounded by crag
and rocky peaks. Near Stonewall there is some
of the most picturesque scenery that I ever saw.
Large masses of red sandstone rocks rise up to
a highth of some hundreds of feet and assume the
appearance of fortifications. These extend for five
or six miles and remind one of some old fortifications
so often described by many of our writers of fiction..
At Stonewall a part of Co "M" of the 1st was left
the remainder coming on to this place. Soon after
leaving Stonewall Capt. Clark and myself rode on in
advance of the column. and taking our leisure arrived
at Virginia Dale. about One. O'clock P.M. nearly
two hours in advance of the column. which on
arriving here went into camp for the night..
Here Capt. Clark and I am to remain. Our journey
is now ended for the present at least. and we are
most heartily glad of it. This is what is called a
"Home Station" and is the HdQuarters of a division of
the road. There is a house. of hewn logs. kept as
a sort of Hotel. a large barn and blacksmith
shop. We are completely surrounded by mountains
with canons running into them in all directions
There is quite a large brook running near the house
and we are told that another near by contains
a large number of trout. Maj Namen and Lieut Canfield
went fishing after going into camp. The day has
been very warm.

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 50

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

29

Sunday July 30th 1865

The Regt passed here today arriving here about 9 O'clock
A.M. Col. Potter commanding this [sub.?] Dist. arrived here
about dark last night and remained until Col. Briggs
arrived with his command. then resumed his journey
in company with the regiment.. I learned that
Major Darling was to take command of Fort Halleck
and would probably keep Co. "H" at that post. Frank
Clark. has been detailed as Post Adjutant at Halleck.
Major Sproule. takes his battalion and goes to
Sulphur Springs.. George Vosburgh brought me a
pony today and I am now. in possession of one of the
famous ponies of the west..
Maj Warner left here with his command
about 7 O'clock this morning. It seemed very strange
to be awoke by the sound of Taylors bugle squawking
out reveillie and know that it did not mean us..
Then to hear. the "General" "Boots and Saddles" and
"To Horse" and know that we were to be left behind
was a sensation we had not experienced for some
time. After the regiment passed us. the day was
quite dull. Everything was new. and it was with difficulty
that we managed to pass the day. During the after
noon some of the boys of the "1st" brought in a
large number of fine trout and two or three Mountain
Grouse or Sage Hens. Two or three of our boys then
started out to try their luck and towards dark
came back with trout enough for a good meal
all around.. After writing a letter to Nell I mounted
my pony and took a ride over some of these hills
and valleys.. to while away an hour.. The day has
been quite warm with a slight shower afternoon
One Coach passed down towards night..
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 51

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

30

Monday July 31st 1865

This morning we commenced work on pay rolls
for May and June and managed to make a very
busy day of it.. This afternoon Sergt Hyde of Co.
"E" arrived with two wagons loaded with rations for
the men. and we drew rations enough to supply the
men until the 1st of September.. The day has been
quite cool and pleasant. Nearly all of the boys
that are not on duty. spend their time in catching
fish and meet with good success… We are expecting
a coach up from Denver tonight. A large emigrant
train passed up the road to day. Quite a number
of women were with it..



Tuesday August 1st 1865.

By steady work we finished our pay rolls to day
and tomorrow Capt. Clark will take them to Fort.
Collins. The day has been cold. and being very
busy within doors I failed to notice anything
of interest occurring outside.. A. coach arrived from
the East today but brought us no mail.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 52

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

31

Wednesday August 2nd 1865

This morning Capt. Clark went down to Fort Collins
on the stage. and will probably be gone until Saturday.
The day has been so very cold and windy today. that
I thought it advisable to put on a good woolen
pair of drawers. and find they add a great deal to
my comfort. A coach was sent up the road today
and Hastings went with it as one of the escorts.
This afternoon Monaghan and I mounted our nags
and started out for a ride. We struck off to the west to
wards the trout brook. and following that up the
canõn. attempted to find a way through to the road.
above here. but. soon found ourselves shut in by
high. rocky cliffs through which we could find no
passage. We then returned to the mouth of the canõn
and decided to climb to the top of one of the cliffs or
crags. and "view the landscape.[O’er?]." We rode our
horses as far as we thought prudint. then dismoun
ted and continued to climb on foot. After half an
hours climbing we finally reached what we concluded
must be the top of one of these peaks. From there
we could see a very great distance in either
direction. to the west of us the country was
all mountains each apparently disconnected
from the others. and rising out of little valleys.
singly and alone.. At a considerable distance we
could see the solid masses of the Rocky Mountains
arising far above all others. and obstructing our further
view. Many of their peaks were covered with snow.
and reaching far up into the clouds. Long's Peak
was quite plainly visible.. To the south we could see
the massive "fortifications" near Stonewall. and
looking away through the mountains we could see
the prarie beyond. stretching far away till lost in
the dim distance. East we could not see far as
the mountains near here bounded our view. To the
North we could see a considerable distance as
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 53

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

32

the country is more open and not so mountainous
The Stage road could be traced away 'till it looked
like a dim. narrow. white line finally lost among
the hills..


Thursday August 3d 1865

This morning I was awakened by a terrible
squealing. and rattling which I at first thought
was some cavalry trumpet. but on become fully
awake. concluded it must be a stage horn. and in
a short time I heard footsteps and Capt. Park with
Capt Glover. came shivering into the tent and to bed.
having ridden all night in the coach. from Fort Collins.
After breakfast. Capt's Glover. Clark. Hastings and
myself went fishing and together caught about 40
fish. and shot three Mountain Grouse.
This afternoon two wagons loaded with rations for the
men above here arrived. bringing us a good wall tent.
which Capt. Clark had obtained yesterday. some
fresh beef. beans and some other stores. which Capt
had made arrangements for.
A messenger arrived from Capt. Robinson. bringing
a letter directed to Capt. Clark. which on opening was
found to contain. letters from Dr. Wynkoop. to Capt.
Clipperton. and the Drs wife stating that the Indians
had attacked the road between. Big. and Little Laramie
stations. stealing considerable stock burning wagons. killing
one man. and one woman. wounding one man and
a little girl and capturing one woman.. They also
attacked the station at Little Laramie. and captured
the stock. and burned the station..
No mail has been received yet.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 54

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

33

Friday, August 4th 1865

Lieut Simmons came down on stage from. Big
Laramie this morning and gave us more particulars con
cerning the trouble with the Indians. At Little Laramie
they captured 14 horses belonging to Co "B" and also woun
ded one man slightly.. Capt Robinson on hearing of
the trouble immediately mustered his command and
started in pursuit riding nearly sixty miles one night
and completely using his horses up. this must have
occurred on Wednesday I think.
I have spent the day in writing and fishing.
It was quite warm until noon when it grew colder. with
slight showers and considerable thunder at intervals during
the afternoon.


Saturday July. August 5th 1865

Col. Potter, Colonel. Briggs. Major Norton and
Lieut Graham arrived from above at 1. P.M. and
although in quite a hurry to reach. Fort Collins. they
were compelled to remain over night for want
of fresh horses. They give us more particulars
about the trouble with the indians having arrived
on the ground near Little Laramie. during the troubles
Col. Briggs gives all our men and Capt. Robinson
great credit for the manner in which they
conducted themselves during the fighting.. Those Killed
were scalped and otherwise horribly mutilated..
In some of the wagons the Indians obtained
a considerable amount of whiskey which is beleived
to have made them more reckless and savage
than usual. Spent day in the usual manner.
reading writing and playing cards. Learned
Commercial Pitch from Capt. Glover.. Day warm
with usual shower.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 55

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

34

Sunday. August 6th 1865

Colonel Briggs stayed with us last night
and proceeded down the road at an early hour
this morning.. This afternoon those who went
up the road on Friday as guards with the two
wagons loaded with commissary stores returned
minus the wagons.. After passing Little Laramie
and arriving in the vicinity of Seven mile Creek
they were attacked by a large party of Indians
and were compelled to abandon the wagons. One of the
drivers left his team and made his escape. The other
George Baker of Co. B. did not leave his team and was
overtaken and killed. A Sergeant of the Colorado. Cav.
was killed and scalped by them; his body was
afterwards recovered and buried by our men.. but
the body of Baker was not recovered. Two other men
were slightly wounded.. One of them belonged to Co "L"
This happened yesterday.. Col. Briggs reported
having met Capt Wilson with his company who
left here yesterday noon. They were met today by
these men between Willow Springs and Big. Laramie.


Monday August 7th 1865
A coach went down the road this morning. taking
the wounded man of Co. "L." A train loaded with
lumber for the government and bound for Fort
Halleck arrived here from La. Porte. escorted by
eight of our men who were stationed at La Porte. They
desire an escort from here but will not be gratified
We have been at work to day tearing down an old
log building that stood half a mile above here on
the creek and removing the logs here to build our
selves a cabin of. The building belonged to Mr
Taylor. who has been in Denver. since we came
here until Saturday when he returned.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 56

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

35

We had been waiting his return to obtain
permission to tear it down which was readily
given.. Mr. Spotswood the agent of the road came
up on Saturday and still remains.. No coach was
sent west today.. The coach that went down this
morning took down a family that came down on
Sunday. consisting of a man and wife and. two
children..


Tuesday August 8th 1865

A coach arrived from the East this morning
bringing a number of "Official Documents" but no mail
A coach went West after dinner taking
Capt Glover and Mr Spotswood. Have been busy
today in laying up the walls of our cabin and putting
up the roof poles and getting it partly chinked.
The boys who came up from. La. Porte returned
to.day.. They were ordered here for duty in accord-
ance with the request of Capt Clark made on last
Friday as they were doing no duty. but under the
new arrangements they were needed at La. Porte
and were consequently ordered back..


Wednesday. August 9th 1865
Sent a coach down this morning and also sent
Tri Monthly Report for August 9th and Monthly
Return for July.. We built our chimney to.day Capt
and I hauling the stores with horse and boat. Jim
mixing mud and Hastings and Sheley laying it
up The day has been fair and quite warm. but
the greatest wonder of all is that it has not rained
as usual.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 57

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

36

Thursday August 10th 1865

Coach from the East arrived at about 3. A:
M. bringing some Official documents from Fort Collins
and a few passengers but no mail This forenoon
while Captain and Shealey with the assistance of Jim
daubed up the house. Hastings. Monaghan and myself
went to brook fishing. Caught trout enough for one good
mess. This afternoon a train consisting of a few Mormon
emigrants on their way to the states and the wagons belong
ing to Captain Wilson's company arrived from Big
Laramie. and from the Sergt having charge of Captain
Wilson's wagons we derived some little information
concerning the Indian troubles above and the result
of Wilson's expedition.. After starting in pursuit of
them from. Big Laramie they visited the scene of
the last troubles and found. the remains of Baker
and the wagons. From appearances it seemed that
George had been chained to one wheel of a wagon and
burned. as his bones were found chained to the tire
of the wheel. They then proceeded towards the moun
tains and just at dark. and while preparing to go
into camp they were attacked by a large force. whom
they fought until dark when they fell back some
distance and went into camp. The next morning
no Indians were to be found.. With the train
were the old man whose wife was captured
by the Indians last week. and his little girl
who was wounded by them. The old man was
himself wounded by them. but the story he told
was anything but likely to enlist our sympathies
for his own misfortunes. Captain visited the
train on a trading expedition and succeeded
in purchasing three chairs and a stove..
The day has been usually warm. Spent
the evening in writing to John Jarvis
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 58

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

37

Friday August. 11th 1865

This morning Hastings. Monaghan. Shealey and
myself. went fishing again and met with very good
success.. Spent afternoon in writing. Day very warm.
Coach went down the road this morning. also train.
Nothing of any interest transpiring


Saturday August. 12th 1865

Have spent the day in playing cards and writing
and without doing a lick of work.. Coach from East
brought as usual. plenty of Official documents. but no
mail for us. Times getting somewhat dull..


Sunday August 13th 1865

Just before daylight two coaches arrived from
the west bringing a large amount of mail and several
passengers. among them Major Warner. Dr Wynkoop and
Mr Spottswood.. Among the mail was some belonging
to our regiment. that had been to Fort Halleck and
was now on its way back. I received a letter from E.T.
the first letter I have received since leaving Julesburg.
Immediately after leaving breakfast one coach went
east taking the passengers and a part of the mail.
About 10 o’clock while quietly seated in my tent
playing “solitary” Stone of Co “M” (1st) came up and in
quired if we had any carbine ammunition saying
that a few Indians had been seen close at hand.
As soon as we could get our arms we shoved
out and just as I stepped out of the tent a party
of ten or twelve came in sight around the point of a
bluff scarcely 40 rods distant. A shot was fired
at them and they made all haste to get out of
the way.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 59

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

38.

Our boys immediately pursued them. going out dis
mounted. We thought the herd, which was in the canon
east of the creek must certainly be captured. and a few
went to look for it. In about 20 minutes it was seen
coming up the road. the boys having driven it down
the canon to the road thus keeping it out of sight of
the Indians who had not discovered it when seen
themselves. As soon as the herd was secured
a few of the men mounted and pursued the
Indians some three miles. At half past one
everything was quiet again.
Spent the afternoon and evening in writing
to Nell and E.T.

Thursday August 14th 1865

To day we put on the roof of our shanty
made a door and nailed up a bedstead. and
tonight we propose to sleep in it. No Indians
came in sight to.day We placed a lookout on
a high peak East of the Dale this morning. where
he can see everything that may approach from
either direction for miles. He remains there while
the herd is feeding. Have heard nothing from
above to day and fear the Indians have been doing
mischief as a train loaded with several days
of mail was at Big Laramie Saturday night
and should have been here on last night but
has not arrived yet. It was intended to send a
coach west tonight but Taylor thought it was
best to wait until tomorrow. and it did not go.
No coach was sent East this morning.

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 60

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

39

Tuesday August 13th 1865
Today we have been at work laying the
floor and other little tinkering about the shanty
which is now quite comfortable. The coach from
the east arrived this morning and brought (2)
Joslyn Carbines for this station but Capt Clark
would not accept them. because of some whim. or
other. Two coaches got ready to start west at
one o’clock P.M. but the men detailed as escort
refused to go without carbines and they were
detained.. Nothing has been heard from above
yet, the train with mail has not arrived
and it is feared something has happened
at Willow Springs or Big Laramie.

Thursday August 17th 1865

Yesterday morning I put on my Sunday fixins
and mounted on the box with “Dave” bound for Fort
Collins. Had a very pleasant ride to Parke where
I was invited to dinner and ate a splendid din
ner of antelope meat. beans. and raisin pie. Arrived
at Fort Collins at 2 P.M. spent the afternoon in atten
ding to a few business matters and visiting with the
various friends. ate supper with Col Briggs.
spent the evening at a social game of cards at
the Sutlers store with several others. and took
the coach at 9 P.M. and arrived at Parke at
midnight. Blacksmith and I doubled our
selves up on the back seat of the coach under a
pair of good blankets and I slept like a log
till morning.. Took breakfast with Mr
Armstrong. who sets an excellent table. and
started for home at 8 A.M. “Stonewall”
driving. About three miles before reaching
Stonewall we met Maj Sproule and Lieut Bentley
in company with the 11th Kansas. on their
way to Fort Collins.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 61

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

40

Arriving at home I learned that the
Indians came down about one oclock yesterday
and failing to capture our horses. had driven
off the cattle. For some cause or other they did
not go far before they shot an arrow into the
old bull and left him. our boys drove him and
killed him just to save his life and we now have
fresh beef. I drew nine more carbines yesterday.
The coach went west this afternoon. The train
for which we had been looking since Sunday
came down yesterday. At Willow Springs on
Sunday the Indians drove off 12 horses and
Killed two men. mutilating them in a horrible
manner. A large mail arrived at Camp Collins
last night for us and will come up on next
coach.

Friday August 18th 1865

Today I built a table and with some other
little jobs which Capt and Sheley did we now con
sider our shanty finished and very comfortable.
Coach went East this morning. Nothing
of any interest transpired during day.

Saturday. August 19th 1865

This morning the coach from Collins brought
up quite a large mail for us. in which I found
four letters for me. Two were from home one from
Irenus McGowan. and one from E.T.
Several passengers were alson on board among
them Dr Wynkoop. Capt Hempstead C.S. formerly
on Gen Connor’s staff. Judge Lawrence an attache of
the P.O. Dept. two of Brigham Youngs sons in law
and one or two traders. Had a slight scare about
5 P.M. which proved to be a party of traders

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 62

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

41
Sunday August 21st/65

Spent the day in answering my letters
everything being quiet. Traders went down the road this
morning. also a large train of wagons which camped
a mile above here last night. About 3 A.M. I was
awakened by a shot apparently some distance
off but as it was not repeated I thought it
was simply imagination. but this morning the
Captain of the trains said a shot was fired from
the bushes near his camp the bull passing near
his head. and this morning one of their horses
could not be found. Our boys searched for
the horse in all directions but could not find
him nor any tracks that would indicate that
Indians had been in the vicinity. Judge Lawrence
has visited us today and used our table to write
on and proves himself to be a very agreeable and
pleasant visitor. entirely free from any presumption
of feeling himself greater than any one else because
he occupies a high position. He was formerly Deputy
Provost Marshal at Washington and told a great many
anecdotes of his past life.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 63

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

42

Monday Aug. 21st/65

This morning Dr Wynkoop. a driver. Hastings
and myself went fishing. but had very poor
luck. Went on foot and got very tired before I got
back. The passengers here are becoming very im
patient to proceed. but there is no coach. or stock
escort. as he now has 8 men at Big Laramie..
Sent a coach down the road as usual this morn
ing. Judge Lawrence. paid us another visit. in fact
is writing at our table nearly all the time. Learned
from his conversation that he has been to California
having gone there in .49 by the New Mexico or
Santa Fe route and was once wounded with
buck shot. by a Navajo Indian.

Tuesday August 22nd/65

Coach from Collins brought a small mail in
which was one letter for me from [illegible in original] Nothing
of interest occurred during the day.. The passengers.
Dr Wynkoop. Capt Hempstead and others are becoming
more anxious to leave and attacked Spottswood who
came up on coach with threats of taking coach and
team and going on without waiting for coach from
West. But Judge Lawrence informed Spottswood
that he had as much to say as any of them. and
no passengers should leave until the mail now
here could go. if it was not in a month.. At dark
or sundown two coaches arrived from the west bring
ing a large amount of mail and several passengers
among them Lieut Canfield. Col Doty and another
and several others. and the tale they told of
Indians up the road somewhat cooled the ardor
of those going up.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 64

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865


43

Lieut Canfield is to spend the night with
us and the coaches will proceed either way tomor
row morning.. Capt received a circular stating that
Major Sproule would relieve the 1st at Stonewall.
Va Dale. Willow Springs and Big Laramie
with men from the 7th and would place 20 men
at each post. and from what the driver says
we expect them tomorrow..


Wednesday August 23d /65

Coach went east at its usual hour. taking the
mail and a part of the passengers. Canfield among
the number. The 1st Mich. with a long train loaded
with forage. rations. ammunition. clothing and [illegible in original]
[illegible in original] reached here about 10 A.M. Left 7th at Ft
Collins to wait for arms from Denver Did not relieve
Co “M.” but left grain for all Drew some clothing
and camp Equippage.. Two Coaches went west
about 10 A.M. taking mail and passengers.
Have been working on Returns of C.C. & G E.

Thursday August 24th /65

ht
Coach from East arrived at 10 A.M. but broug^
no mail. Maj Sproule arrived at 2 P.M. and [went?]
into camp for the night. He has left 20 men of Co “I.”
at Stonewall and brought orders for me to proceed
there immediately to take command of them.. but as
he proposes going out [illegible in original due to smudge] among the mountains
on a scout to [illegible in original] he has given me permission
to go with him and I shall not go down until Mon
day. Lieut Lyon is with him. Capt Birney remained
at Fort Collins. Lieut Sessions with 40 men was
left to guard an ox train which camped on Cache
Le Poudre to night
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 65

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

44

Friday August 25th 1865

About 8 o’clock this morning we started
for the mountains. the party consisting Major Sproule
Capt Clark Lieut Lyons. two scouts or guides. employees
of the O.S.S Co. about 35 men and myself..
Taking as nearly a due westerly course as possible
we proceeded through canons. valleys. upland
plains or table mountains. passed peaks picturesque
or romantic enough to please the fancy of any
one. for a distance of about ten miles when we
reached the Cache Le Poudre at the foot of a high
range of mountains. whose sides were covered
more plentifully with timber than any one
had before seen. Finding good feed we halted
unbridled and turned our horses loose to graze
while bringing forth our fishing tackle we pre
pared to lure the shining fish from their native
element. An hours trial gave me three trout. and then
we started to find an outlet home. by a direction
different from that in which we came..
Half a mile down the stream we ran into
a rocky. narrow. canon filled with a rank
growth of underbrush. through which it was
impossible for us to go. We then dismounted
and led our horses up the side of the mountain
which was quite as steep as a common house
roof and a hundred feet high or more. then
leisurely descended a gently sloping hill into
a small valley in which we found the Cache
Le Poudre. much larger very swift full of rocks
and trout. We halted again and brought out
our tackle once more and proceeded to make
war upon the finny tribes.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 66

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

45

We remained here about two hours during
which time I shot a grouse. ate plenty of Huckle
berries Gooseberries. cherries etc. lost my meerschaum
but caught no fish. Maj Sproule caught a large
string of the finest fish I ever saw. and many of
the boys had equally good success. making in the
whole nearly a hundred trout almost any of which
would weigh a pound.. We then started for camp
taking the back track. but after reaching the top
of the mountain we proceeded along the side for
more than a mile being a hundred feet above
the valley beneath.. We reached camp without
any incident worthy of note. about 5 P.M.
Lieut Sessions with the train had come up
and gone into camp a mile above here and
after supper I mounted “Dick” again and
went up to see some of the boys. Found Graham.
Fisher. [Remine?]. Horsch. Stout and McAllister..
and staid about an hour with them Did not
see Sessions.

Saturday August 26th 1865

Coach from East arrived about 3 A.M bringing
Dr Smith. who had been sent for to attend the
girl at Taylors who has been sick nearly a
week. and. Capt. McCormick. who came with
him to enjoy the fun of fishing and hunting
for a couple of days. Maj Sproule moved
on at eight oclock this morning. Capt Colerick
and Co “M” of the first going with him. Maj
Sproules induced the Capt. and Dr to try fishing today
in Beaver creek as he had seen some fish in it
this morning and a young beaver. so they and I
started out to try our luck.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 67

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

46

I furnished the Dr with a hook and
line which he broke before we commenced to fish.
I then gave him mine and took his gun to amuse
myself. I shot a fine young grey eagle and the
Dr caught five splendid trout and returned in time
for dinner.. This afternoon we did nothing but play
cribbage and sleep. Just as I had begun to
doze nicely our lookout fired his carbine and
we sallied forth. Hastings. Monaghan. and Johnny
Taylor who had been up the road with a team
after logs came driving furiously down the road.
and reported a party of suspicious looking persons
coming down the road. We prepared to meet them
and give them as warm a welcome as possible
and soon they came in sight and proved to be a
large party of Californians on their way to the states
Quite a number of them were from Michigan and
made inquiries for men from their native places..
They have gone into camp for the night near
us

Sunday Aug ust 27th

About 10 A.M. Capt McC. Dr S and
myself with three or four men went down Beaver
Creek to fish but were sadly disappointed as we
found a wide sluggish stream. with bare banks
and containing nothing but suckers that would
not bite. and a couple of hours fishing satisfied
us that we could employ our time better at home
and so we returned. Dr. shot a prarie dog which
with half a dozen trout made up the results
of our days expedition. The Californians went
on down the road this morning. One of them
being pretty "hard up" offered a rifle for sale
which I finally bought.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 68

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

47

Monday August 28th /65

Coaches from west arrived about 2 A M.
bringing heavy load of mail but no passengers.
This morning I packed up my duds and getting
a part of them on the coach came down to Stone
wall in accordance with orders. Dr. Smith
and Capt. McCormick went back to Fort
Collins this morning.. A short distance this
side of Dead Man's Creek I saw four or five
antelopes half a mile away. Day warm and
sultry. Find 20 men here.


Tuesday August 29th /65

This morning I took Durling. Simonds
and Wakefield and went over to the Cache Le Poudre
to look at a deserted ranche to see if it would pay
to move it here to build us a house of. After ex
amining the shanty. Durling and Simonds wanted
to fish so leaving them to do so. Wakefield and I
started across the creek among the hills to see if
we could get a shot at an Antelope or deer.
We rambled among the hills for a couple of hours
seeing nothing but a small rabbit which I shot.
We then endeavored to find Durling and Simonds
but although we went to where we had agreed to
meet them we could see nor hear anything
of them. We then crossed the creek at the mouth of
a small brook where we found a trail of a party
of Indians. __ at least we decided the were Indians
as the tracks of the ponies showed them to be unshod
and several moccasin tracks were seen in the sand
nearby. – and which appeared to be less than a
day old.

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 69

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

48

We then searched for the tracks of Durling's
and Simond's. horses and found the tracks of two
shod horses quite fresh and leading towards home
and concluding that they had gone home we decided
to follow. and accordingly set forth. We halted
once to pick cherries and let our horses graze awhile
and then wandered around over the bluffs for a
couple of hours and reached camp at noon but
found no Durling or Simonds. In about an
hour they arrived with a long story of their
adventures to tell. While quietly fishing they were
startled by the report of a pistol and a ball came
whistling close to their heads. and on looking up they
saw two men one dressed in the uniform of a soldier
and the other in a half Indian costume who were
firing at them with their revolvers. They tried
to make them understand who they were but
only succeeded in drawing more bullets when
they sought refuge in a clump of bushes.
About this time up came Co. "L" of our regiment
on a gallop with the gallant Clipperton in
the rear. and a few words served to explain the
affair. A party of Indians had driven off
the herd yest at Big Thompson yesterday
morning and Capt Clipperton had been ordered
out to search for them. and their scouts coming
upon our boys had commenced firing upon them
without waiting to satisfy themselves as to their
being Indians. The capt was greatly excited
telling our boys that the indians would cer
tainly kill them.. and when informed that I
was in the vicinity was however struck at our
temerity in venturing into the den of the lion.
when at that particular moment there was
not an indian in a days ride from there
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 70

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

49

Wednesday August 30 /65.

This morning Capt. Clark sent down a
four mule team and tent under the same escort
with the coach which arrived here at 9 A..M.
The coach had neither mail or passengers.
Day very warm. nothing to be done so laid in
the shanty all day Yesterday afternoon a party
of Six hay makers and a few soldiers as guards
arrived here. and after fixing up the corrall got
ready to start for the hay grounds. when some
of the hay makers refused to go without arms
and remained here. After supper. Vogt and
I took our guns and took a stroll over the
mountains in search of rabbitts. and killed
one.

Thursday August 31st /65

The coach from the east arrived about 9.A.M.
but no mail. I received some ammunition
for which I had sent by Dr Smith.. The only
work done today was to have the boys haul a load
of wood with the mules. This afternoon I sent
[illegible in original] to Parke Station after a mule belonging
to this team and on his return he told me that
he had heard that Dr. Smith had been woun
ded through elbow by an Indian arrow. in a
fight that some party had with them in
the mountains on Tuesday… and it was
feared that he would be obliged to submit to
its amputation..
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 71

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

50

Friday September 1st 1865.

This morning I pitched my tent and
made preparations for living by myself.
The coach from above brought my sachel
and some other traps. I sent six men with
the team to the creek after the old shanty that
I visited on Tuesday. to make the first step
towards building quarters for the men. and this
made up the sum of today’s labors excepting
the writing of some letters.. Day as usual quite
warm and rather dull and lonesome. Had
quite a shower during the afternoon..


Saturday Sept. 2nd /65

Intended going up to the Dale on coach
this morning. but on waking up about one
o'clock I found the coach had arrived and
was just ready to start on again. and
concluded not to get up at that time of
night to ride up there in an overloaded coach.
Last night was quite cold. and this morning
and forenoon cool with one smart little shower.
This afternoon Keith. [illegible in original]. Simonds and I
took a ride to see if we could find some timber
to make a shanty of. After riding till nearly
sundown and finding nothing we returned to
camp. having seen no game. not even a rabbitt.
On reaching camp I found Capt. McCormick
and Sergt De.Graff. with five wagons loaded
with Commissary stores. which they were to
issue to the men stationed between Ft Collins
and Big Laramie.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 72

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865


51

They had just arrived and gone into
camp for the night. and I offered the Capt.
and Sergt a share in my tent which they have
accepted. From them I learned the particulars
concerning Dr. Smiths wound. and the fight
in which he received it. He was with Capt.
Clippertons party on Tuesday who came upon
a couple of Indians guarding a herd of stolen
horses numbering about 20. and immediately
attacked them. The Dr with his usual bravery
and impetuosity pressed forward and attacked
one of the Indians who showed fight like a
man. When within a very short distance from
the Indian he discharged an arrow at the
Dr which took effect near the elbow of his left
arm the steel head passing clear through the
bone. The Dr finding it impossible to draw it
out broke the wood short off and firing twice
at the Indian killed him. Seventeen bullet
holes were found in the Indians today. His
comrade was more cowardly and attempted
to escape but a ball from one of the carbines
killed him. Capt C. then returned to the
Fort with the stock.. Capt McC. brought
up mail which contained nothing for me.


Sunday Sept. 3d /65

This morning I saddled up and went with
Capt McCormick to Va. Dale. when I arrived at 9:30
A.M. Found three letters awaiting me that had
come up on the coach Friday night. The day.
has been very cold, and after noon we had a fire
built in the fireplace which made it much more
comfortable.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 73

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

52

About four P.M. we heard a terrible
roaring and on looking out saw Jim and Sheley's
tents on fire and too far gone to save anything but
our mess chest. All their clothing. and blankets
were burned up. and my saddle and bridle ruined.
A hundred pounds of flour we had just bought
was nearly ruined and a bag with 60 pounds of
sugar was almost spoiled while another containing
ten or twelve pounds of coffee was burned and the
coffee spoiled. 30 pounds of beans shared a like fate
in all making a loss of nearly 50 dollars.
Sheley was out hunting with a party. and Jim
had taken an old stove without pipe and setting
it in the door of his tent had built a fire and
then gone for a pail of water .. when the wind
blowing strong had raised the flames until they
caught. the canvas when everything was soon in
flames.. Taylor invited us to supper and
we ate a splendid supper of antelope venison
potatoes. and other "chicken fixins" At dusk
the hunters returned bringing in the quarters
of a huge antelope. Two coaches arrived from Big
Laramie about 2 P.M. with a heavy load
of mail and one or two passengers. A little
before dark Reynolds Gen. Superintendent of
a section of the road arrived from below with
a span of mules and buggy. Sergt Maj Jack
son arrived at 7 P.M. with an order calling
for the number of men whose term of service
expires prior to February 1st 1866. and an order
to the commanding officers at each station
to furnish him with a relay of horses. in
order to enable him to reach Fort Halleck
get his reports and return at the earliest
moment.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 74

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865


53

He seems to think the men whose term of
service expires within that time will be mustered
out this fall and be permitted to go home..
He also informed us of several appointments
Col Briggs has lately made. Major Darling to
Lieut Col. Capt. Carpenter to Major. Lieuts
Crocker and Dunnett to Capts. Crocker to "F."
and Dunnett to "G." Co. 2nd Lieuts. Clark.
Ferris. Buck and myself to 1st Lieuts. and [illegible in original]
Jackson. DeGraff. Anthony. Cameron. Thomas
Warner Hastings and Neale. to 2nd Lieuts..
The commissions have been sent for. and it is
expected they will soon arrive. Jack and his man
received horses and. started for Willow Springs
at 9. P.M..


Monday Sept. 4th /65.

This morning I came down. starting
from the Dale with the coach. and taking
my own time to the journey yet reaching
here shortly after the coach. A little way this
side of Dead Man's Creek. we saw five
Antelopes some half a mile away. Those who
were with the coach. said when first seen
they were very close to the road. This Creek
is said to derive its name from the fact of there
being formed on its banks. by those who first
white
travelled this route to lay the road. a ^ man. dead
upon its bank near the spot where the road
crosses it. He was buried on a little knoll
south of the creek. and his grave is plainly
seen to.day by the stones that cover it.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 75

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

54

Capt. Clark. Mr. Spottswood. one passenger
a soldier and three or four stage drivers. came
down this morning. Capt has gone to Fort
Collins and will return by next coach.
This afternoon. Spottswood sent up two. six.
mule teams. from Parke Station to remain
here. After supper Keith and I took a
stroll over the hills a little ways from camp
but saw no game.

Tuesday Sept 5th /65

About 2 A.M. the coach from Denver
arrived bringing a heavy load of mail. Capt. Clark
Mr. Spottswood and one or two passengers. the
first change of stock was made tonigh then. and
hereafter all coaches will change teams here. No
way mail was received but Capt assured me that
a mail arrived at Collins and would be upon
next coach. This morning Keith. [illegible in original]
Wakefield. OBrien and myself took a hunt
on foot. being gone till nearly noon. but saw
no game excepting one rabbit Spent afternoon
in writing letters to Aunt: J. and Cousin J.
evening to L. A. Capt informed me that
the orders which Jackson carried up the road
were looking toward a consolidation of the three
regiments and that the new commissions would
never be used to muster on. If this be true a
number of us now stand a good chance of being
mustered out and going home ere long: as
none but the very best will be retained. Three
officers to every hundred men will be retained
and a 1st Lieut to each fractional fifty.
Day clear and very warm. Swartz sent
me some stationery on last nights coach.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 76

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

Wednesday Sept. 6th /65

Coach from Dale. or rather no coach
but a "lead" consisting of stock. and Taylor’s
wagon. arrived about 10. A.M. and brought
no mail or passengers. Capt. sent me three
sack's of grain. Huston, the hunter, came down
and stopped to wait until next coach going
East. After dinner Huston. [illegible in original] Durling.
Vogt and myself went hunting. We decided
on taking a direction different from any I had
before taken in hopes to find more game. Going
over the hill east of the station and bearing north
along the base of the mountain we soon found
ourselves near Box Elder Canon. and on the
top of a high bluff. below which lay a beautiful
h
canon. leading away to the Northwest. and throug^
which we desired to go. in order to reach the plains
near the head of Dead Man's Creek. We then
passed over the top of mountain more than a quarter
of a mile in heighth and descended into the canon
below. Reaching the bottom we struck the trail
of a large body of Indians apparently about
four days. old. who had descended the canon
to near the spot where we first struck it. and
finding it impossible to proceed farther had
turned southward and gone over the moun
tains in the direction of Va Dale. and probably
striking the plains at a point within two
miles of this station. We proceeded up the
canon more than two miles between. beautiful
peaks. until we struck the open hills near
the head waters of Dead Man's Creek. and then
considered ourselves in the heart of the antelope
feeding grounds.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 77

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

56

As yet we had seen no game. not even a
rabbit. and after wandering over the table lands
for a mile or two. began to think our hunt
would prove fruitless and after reaching a sort of
bluff. from whence we could see miles away
in either direction over the plains and spying
nothing we turned towards home. We had gone
but a short distance. when passing around a
small hill. four Black tailed Deer sprang up
and bounded away over the hills. and up a steep
rocky bluff. Huston. fired a shot after them.
but they were just passing over the tops of a
small hill. and he did not touch them.
After running a few hundred yards farther.
they stopped and turned to look at us. Huston
endeavored to get closer. but they took alarm
again and bounded away soon passing out
of sight. We took their trail and followed it
two or three miles but saw no more of them.
They were the most beautiful animals I ever
saw. and I fancy a good slice of their flesh
would have made an excellent dish. We returned
to camp at dusk. Huston killing a rabbit a little
while before we reached camp. Huston is a young
man. apparently but a little more than 20 years
of age but has been in this country since. the
spring of .57. has spent three years with a tribe
of Indians and is well acquainted with their
habits of life. I listened to a story of his experiences
among them this evening with great interest.
The day has been very warm. and clear.
Jackson passed here at 4 P.M. but I
did not see him.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 78

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

57

Thursday September 7th 1865

About one o'clock last night the coach from
Denver arrived bringing a considerable load of mail
and baggage. with several passengers. among them
Gen. Thomas Francis Meagher. now Secretary of
Montana Territory on his way to assume the duties of
his new position. He proved to be a tall. slim. one armed
man. dressed apparently in military costume. with
a military over coat. [withal?] a well formed man.
I caught but a passing glimpse of his features
by moonlight. and could judge but little of his
age. He is apparantly one who knows that he
has earned a world wide renown by his gallant
conduct on the hard fought fields of Virginia and
claims all due deferences from those whom he
meets. A small [illegible in original] mail was received. an
Official Circular being the only document for
me. Said Circular states. that information has
been received at the HdQrts of this. Sub. District
leading to the beleif that. the Indians will attempt
another raid on various posts along the route
between Sulphur Springs and Virginia Dale
within the next ten days. and enjoins extra vigi
lance upon all post commanders. and was dated
Sept 6th. These beautiful moonlight mornings
will afford them excellent opportunities for stealing
among the hills and surprising the unwary..
As early as possible. this morning. Huston with
Wakefield. Billinger. Liddy. Clegg. Sgt.Gates. &
our. "mule whacker" started out in the directions
of Dead Mans Creek to try their luck again.
About 9 A.M. Capt. McCormick and Sgt De
Graff arrived with their train on their way to
Collins.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 79

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

58

They had been as far up as Big
Laramie.. and issued their rations and. had
camped at Virginia Dale last night. They were
going through to the Fort today. A coach con
taining a heavy load of mail. and two passengers
arrived soon afterwards. Received a letter from
Frank Clark dated "Halleck Sept 3d"
McCormick's outfit stopped but a few moment.
The Capt had coaxed Mrs Taylor's Antelope away
and was taking it home. The hunters seeing the
coach had come in. as Huston wished to go
home. on it. They had seen a few Antelope and
Al. had wounded one just before the coach had
come in sight. but gave up the chase in order
to take the coach. The day has been very warm.
and clear as usual.


Friday September 8th 1865

This morning Sergt Keith with. Wakefield
Durling and Simonds went hunting and were gone
until 4 P.M. returning with nothing. The day has
been very warm with a high wind until nearly
sundown. when it turned quite cold. At sundown
two wagons and an ambulance arrived from
Fort Collins. with Sergt Bates and three men as
escorts. I received a large Hospital tent and
poles from Capt Ballard for the use of my men.
One of these wagons is loaded with printing paper
for use of a paper in Salt Lake City. the other for with
forge and other kinds of Blacksmith's materials for
use of troops at Big Laramie.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 80

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

59

Tuesday Sept. 12th 1865.
2 .. P.M.
Last Saturday morning I found it
very cold. the wind had been blowing "big guns" all
night and the atmosphere felt like snow very
much and I found the stove in the Stock Keeper's
room very comfortable indeed. After breakfast I had
the boys unroll the tent with a view to putting it up.
but found it torn so badly that it could not be used
and decided to do no more with it. I then took
Billings and started for Virginia Dale intending to
return during the afternoon. We found the air quite
keen and biting and overcoats very comfortable articles
of clothing. We could see the snow falling rapidly on
the Snowy Mountains and thought it not impossible
that it might then ere night. We passed the wagons near
Dead Mans Creek and reached the Dale. about 10. o'clock
found that the Captain had butchered the heifer as I
had requested and the boys almost ready to start
back with the beef. Found a blazing. roaring fire
in the fire place and after sitting before it awhile
made up my mind that it was very cold out
of doors.. Soon after dinner "Uncle Jimmy" arrived
from Big Laramie bringing no mail or passengers
He said it was snowing hard when he left Big
Laramie. and when he reached Willow Springs
he had more than two inches of snow on his
coach. Just before sundown we had quite a squall
of snow. During the afternoon three men came
back from Stonewall to escort the next coach
east and I finally concluded to remain until
Monday morning rather than take back Billings
and leave but three men for escort. Spent after
noon in playing cribbage with Will Taylor.
Tom Smith and Capt Clark
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 81

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

60

Saturday night was very cold. and Sun
day morning although clear proved very cold.. but
grew warmer towards night. Sunday was usually
dull. wrote reply to letter that I received on Friday
night's coach. and played a few games of cribbage
with Taylor and Tom. Smith. About 2 P.M. a large
ox train belonging to a company of traders arrived
from the west. followed by a small train belonging
to a couple of mountaineers who had been in the
vicinity of Fort Halleck. but were then on their
way towa the vicinity of Fort Collins where they
intend to spend the winter. These two men had
with them five Sioux squaws. and a large drove
of cattle. mules and ponies. and several [pets?] con
sisting of sheep. goats. tame elks. and grey hounds.
We all felt a great curiosity to see the tame elk
but were much disappointed in them. They proved
to be a very homely. awkward. clumsy creature
of a dirty brownish color. and appeared nearly
tired out. they were probably about. six months
old. many of their ponies and mules were handsome
ones. The squaws rode ponies. and assisted in driving
the herd.. riding astride like a man. Some half
dozen children. half breeds. were trudging along
helping to drive the stock.. About 4. P.M.
Capt Birney. now. Acting Assistant Inspector
General on Col. Briggs' staff arrived being on a
tour of inspection over the road. and about sun
down Lieut Ingersol. arrived on his way to
Little Laramie to rejoin his company. Bothe spent
the night with us. Capt Birney brought blanks
for pay rolls and Capt Clark wished me to
remain over Sunday Monday to assist in
making them out and after some urging I
consented to remain
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 82

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865


61

Monday morning we commenced work bright
and early and before bedtime time had the rolls nearly
completed. The day was more moderate than Sun
day had been and we were able to work with no
fire and our house door open. Monday morning a
coach went east and returned at 3 o'clock this morn
ing bringing me two letters one from J.J. and
one from C.M.. We had expected a coach from
the west last night but it did not arrive. and I
found we might have to wait until Wednesday for
one to go East again. Wagner and I set ourselves
at work at the Pay. Rolls. again and had got them
almost completed when. the coach arrived from the
West I accompanied the coach home arriving
here about 11. A.M. It is now intended to
run a coach daily each way. as soon as everything
can be got in running order. Five passengers were
on the coach going west this morning. none going
east. A large Ox train that camped at the
forks of the road yesterday passed the Dale this
morning just before the arrival of the western
coach. While escorting the coach from Willow Springs
Saturday morning two horses gave out and were
abandoned. and this morning one more gave
out. This is not to be wondered at. horses have no
grain. and but very poor grazing. unshod. and
in this condition are expected to gallop after a
coach 15 miles without a moment to rest or
even breathe. Our large cavalry horses can
never endure it and 'tis cruel to ask them
to. Sunday Capt. Clark. traded a miner
a pair of pants and shirt for a piece of gold
in bar. said to contain 16. Pennyweights of
pure gold, or of the value of 12 dollars
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 83

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

62

Wednesday September 13th /65

Yesterday afternoon about half past
three o'clock I was aroused from a drowse that
I had fallen into by hearing some one calling
me and looking up I saw. Capt. Clipperton.
who took me out and introduced me to a Mr.
Head a very pleasant agreeable looking man.
and soon afterward to Gov. Duryea of Utah Territory
and now on his way to Salt Lake City.. The Gov.
proved to be a very pleasant person. about 5 feet 8.
quite stout. but not corpulent. full face. ruddy
complexion. brown hair and keen blue eyes very
sociable and the evening passed off pleasantly,
I hope, to all.. Mr Head was travelling to in
company with Gov. D. but in what capacity
I did not learn He proved to be a very sociable,
lively sort of person. and I liked both he and
the Gov. very much.. Capt Clipperton had two or
three wagons loaded with supplies of rations
for the remainder of this month and issued
to our men.. they resumed their journey
at an early hour this morning. This after
noon [Bilderback?] came in with three loads
of hay and commenced a riot in the corrall.
Sergt Hastings came down on the coach this
morning on his way to Fort Collins and brought
me a good buffalo robe. which I had commis
ioned "Uncle Jimmy" to procure for me from
Little Laramie. Day has been very warm
Did nothing except write letter to E.T. this
evening.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 84

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

63

Thursday Sept. 14th 1865

Coach from East brought considerable
mail this morning. Received a letter from.
J.N. Stephens. written at Atchison Ka's.
Coach from west has not arrived to.day.
This afternoon I went up on lookout and saw
large train go into camp near the forks of the
west
road north of here. Day has been very warm
Have done nothing at all today.



Friday September. 15th /65
Coach from Salt Lake arrived after
9 O'clock last night and I was highly
pleased to find Frank Clark on board who
stayed over night with me. and informed
me that the train which camped above was
our supply train under the command of
Capt Sergeant who with his company is going
to Fort Collins This morning about 7 o'c'k
Capt Sergeant and his train reached here. I
sent away my team as I had no use for
it and did not wish to be troubled any
longer with it. About 10. A.M. Lieut
Canfield arrived followed by a detachment of
[200? 500?] men of the 21st N.Y. cav. guarding a
large train loaded with supplies of clothing
and forage. They issued these to us giving
us 20 days forage Lieut C. remained
to dinner with me and then I went with
him to Va. Dale for the sake of variety..
Cap Clipperton arrived from Va Dale soon
after Lieut Canfield but stopped only a
short time as he was anxious to overtake
Cap Sergeant.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 85

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

64

Saturday Sept. 126th 1865

I thought yesterday afternoon that
I would return on the coach from Va Dales.
but as it did not arrive until nearly day
light. I concluded to wait until after break
fast and then overtake Lieut Bowles and
Co "D." who camped near the Dale last
night. I found Lieut B. camped just
across the creek south of the dale in the very
he
worst spot I could have found to camp. He
was almost ready to move and I waited for
him. About half way between there and here
before the coach from the east arrived. Where it
did I found a suspicious looking document
directed to me and bearing the endorsement.
"Official Business" and two much more
pleasant looking documents. I found the
"O.B." an order calling on me to give my
reasons for being absent from my station
last Sunday when Capt Birney A.A.G.G.
arrived here. The others were one from Nell
the other from E.T. both welcome and inter
esting. Also received my new bridle which
"Dick" Phillips had been making for me.
In the evening I made out the report.
called for from Lieut Dunnett and also
wrote a request to Dr Upjohn for medicine
for my men. Day clear and very warm.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 86

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865


65

Sunday Sept. 17th /65

Coach from west arrived at daylight
and from east about 9 A.M. Day warm.
dry and dull. Took a good scrubbing this
morning and spent the day in writing
letters to Nell. J. Jarvis. J.N. Stephens and
E.T. A little afternoon a few men driving
a herd of ponies and California horses arrived.
I noticed among them some of the horses from
our Company at Virginia Dale. and learned
from one of the drivers that they had traded
three horses with Capt Clark. sold him two
and Taylor two. Day continued warm as


Monday. September 18th /65

Day as usual continues warm and dry.
although we had one or two gusts of wind
and a few drops of rain about sundown.
About four P.M. Lieuts Weill and Tubbs
arrived with Co "G" and went into camp
near here. They intend releiving my men
but seem to expect that I am to remain in
command of the station however but I think
they will find themselves mistaken ere many
days pass by. Spottswood passed up the
road this morning.. This afternoon Liver
more of Co "E" shot a Coyotte with his
revolver.. at a distance of. as he said. "only
about 20 rods"
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 87

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

66

Tuesday Sept. 19th /65

Lieutenant Hill left Sergt McMurphey
and fourteen men here this morning and
went on down to Parke the The coach this
morning from the west consisted of an old
St Joe. and Salt. Lake Express wagon to
which "Ed." had hitched six mules and Davis
led six more as they were making an extra
lead to regulate the stock.. The wagon con-
tained a small amount of mail some grain
and Captain Birney who had completed his
tour of inspection and was returning to Fort
Collins.. About 9. A.M. Lieut Canfield
arrived on his way back to Collins travelling
in company with a party of "pilgrims"
on their journey east.. He stopped about three
fourths of an hour with me. At then. A M.
Ed. arrived from the east with a coach loaded
with considerable mail and five or six pass-
engers among. Dr. [Phinflog?]." I received an
"[illegible in original]" of "Special order. 4$" ordering Lieut
Geo W Hill to proceed to this place with a
detachment of Co "G" and releive me and
ordering me to immediately proceed with
my command to Virginia Dale and report
to Captain Clark.. Immediately sent a
request to Capt. Clark. to send me a wagon.
to move grain and rations and at sundown
Wakefield and [illegible in original] arrived so I shall move
tomorrow.. Day has been cloudy with quite a
cool breeze. nearly all day. and a few sprink
lings of rain.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 88

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865


67

Wednesday September 20th

This morning I sent away the grain and
six men to Virginia Dale. Coach from West arrived at
9 A.M. that from the east at 1 P.M. Lieut Hill
came up on coach from Parke.. At noon McMichael
reported to me that soon after taking out the herd
to their usual feeding place. this morning they heard
horses whinnying a little ways from them and
rode in that direction to ascertain the cause when
they discovered three men whom from their general
appearance. and hurried riding they supposed them
to be Indians. and although they were making haste
to get out of sight as soon as possible the boys decided
to change the herd from that to another feeding
place. The day. as usual has been intensely hot
and my tent quite uncomfortable.. From the
escort that came down with the coach I learn
that Col. Briggs with the remainder of the 21st
N.Y. Cav. has gone up the road having gone
by the western road from La. Porte. Capt. Car-
penter was coming down the road and met Col. Brigg
who directed him to go by that road to Camp Collins
About 4 P.M. Dunn and Billinger arrived
with a team to draw the remainder of the things
here. shall leave here for good tomorrow morning
Received a small mail which contained
nothing for me.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 89

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

68
Thursday Sept. 21st /65

This morning we left Stonewall for good..
and arrived at Virginia Dale at noon. Found
the Capt. deep in a horse trade with some
"pilgrims" on their way home to the states.
We finally succeeded in making an exchange
of two sore backed horses for two "California ponies"
Among the travellers I found one man. formerly
from Niles Michigan. who told me he used to
keep the Pavilion Hotel five or six years ago. but
I did not learn his name and can not place him
in my mind.. when I arrived Huston and several
of the boys had gone hunting and did not return
until long after dark but brought in no game.
Shealey says they saw a plenty but failed to kill
any.
As I was coming up I met the eastward
bound coach. but the western bound has not
arrived today. No good reason can be imag
ined for the non arrival. Day has been more
comfortable than usual and somewhat more
windy.
I saw an officer in the coach this morning
but caught but passing glimpse and did not
recognize him. but on making inquiries of the Capt
on reaching here learned that it was Lieut House
of Co. "A: who has been very ill for some time
past and was on his way to the Hospital at
Fort Collins. and is now waiting the acceptance
of his resignation on this account.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 90

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

69

Friday September 22nd 1865

This morning before we had got up the door
of our shanty was opened and Capt. Loomis walked
in somewhat surprising us. I remembered then
having heard, sometime during the night. a coach
arrive which I supposed to be the one from
Denver but which it seems was the one from
the west. The one from the east arrived here
about midnight and meeting the one from the
west between here and Willow Springs..
"Jim" was on his way to Collins and went on
with the coach. which also contained four or five other
passengers. Wm Taylor went down on this coach.
After breakfast I went down to see if Huston
was going hunting this morning. but he thought
it was going to be too windy and having some
'tinkering" about his 'shanty" he concluded not to
go. I found Monaghan wanting to go and so
we two started to try our luck alone.. We followed
Beaver Creek some three or four miles then struck
across to Dead Man's creek followed that up a
mile or more. and then struck through the hills
for the plains.. On reaching the plains we skirted
the hills a few miles in the direction of the
Cache Le Poudre. where seeing no game we grew
tired and decided on striking straight across
the plains towards the head of Dead Man's creek
and go to camp. We did so. saw no game. fired
a few shots at a [mark?]. while our horses were
feeding struck through the mountains by a narrow
canon and found ourselves about a mile and a half
from home. thoroughly tired and unmercifully
hungry. and glad to get home. Saw an old. Indian
camping ground a great deal of new country.
much beautiful scenery. but nothing endowed with
life larger than a rabbitt. Stage from East arrived during
P.M. party of freighters camped here tonight
going to Fort Halleck
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 91

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

70

Tuesday September 26th /65

Since Saturday night I have been at Willow
Springs assisting Capt. Loomis to make up his
papers pertaining to Co 'A' returning this morning
Last Saturday morning not being content with
my ill luck on Friday two men and myself went
with Huston hunting. We struck out through the
hills to the north east until we reached the praries
east of Willow Springs. over which we wandered
during four or five hours. Huston shot two splen
did bucks but in packing the last one. we met
with quite a misfortune. Two quarters were placed
on Flood's horse. but he being restive. after we
had proceeded a short distance we halted to make
them more secure. when he became frightened took
away and ran towards home at the highth of his
speed. We could not overtake him. but watched
him more than two miles as he ran across the
praries and then started for camp. On reaching
the herd we found the horse already there but
minus the meat. I also shot a "Jackrabbit" and
we returned to camp well loaded. On arriving in
camp I found Capt. Loomis. Frank Clark
H. Carpenter and W. DeGraff. there. Jim and Frank
had come up on the coach and insisted on my
accompanying them to Willow Springs. DeGraff
was returning to Fort Collins with his [comy?]
train and Carpenter had a detachment of
men from Big Laramie as escort. I got on
the coach with Frank and Capt. and we arrived
at Willow Springs about 8 P.M. Frank did not
stop but went on to Big Laramie and Fort Halleck..
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 92

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

71
Sunday and Monday I was busy
at work all day on Capt's papers but had the
satisfaction of seeing them completed at about
9 O'clock last night. and this morning I crawled
out at 3 o'clock and rode down with "Uncle Jimmy"
arriving at a little before sunrise..
Being busy at work both days I was at
Willow Springs and passing to and fro in the night
I saw but little of the country. The station consists
of a shanty or ranch. built of logs and con
taining three rooms, and a log barn. It is
not surrounded by as picturesque scenery as
either Stonewall or this place although situated
amid small hills that obscure the view over
the praries. My impression is that it is a dull,
lonely place. Lieut Carpenter with his command
arrived here at about 11 o'clock this forenoon. He brought
the intelligence that Lieut Sessions had started from
Fort Collins with a party of eighteen men to escort..
Gen Dodge to Fort Leavenworth, and that it was
expected that on reaching Fort Leavenworth they
would be mustered out as each man had been fur-
nished with his Description List and other papers
necessary to accomplish that effect end.. Lieut Sessions
seems to be a fortunate person in the respect of receiv-
ing "Soft" places, yet I do not know of an officer
who would accept his nice things. and be compelled
to bear the reputation as a soldier that he bears
among his brother officers.. The coach from
Denver arrived at 3:30 P.M. bringing Spottswoods. two
passengers and a heavy load of mail. The "Way
Pocket" contained a small mail. those letters for
the company. but none for me..
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 93

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

72
Wednesday September 27th
186

Last night I decided on taking Sheley and
trying an Antelope hunt on my own hook. so
at daylight I rolled out and at sunrise we
were in the saddle and off. The morning was
clear and cool. scarcely a breath of air and I promised
myself a good day. but found in a short time
that I was a mighty poor "weather prophet" for ere
the sun had been up an hour a strong west
wind came up and continued all day making
it very disagreeable and unpleasant. We wandered
all the forenoon, seeing one Coyotte. whom I frightened
badly presenting him my card at his very feet
a distance of about. 150 yards. and two or three
straggling "bucks" that I found it very difficult
to approach upon the open prarie. and they too, being
invariably to the leeward of us. Try as I would, they
were always beyond rifle shot when I gained my
point. until I finally gave up the pursuit and
began to turn my thoughts and steps homewards.
After riding carelessly and leisurely some distance
I was passing over the top of a rocky knoll I
suddenly spied a huge buck partly concealed
by rocks at a distance of nearly 200 yards away.
There was no chance for me to "change my base"
and attempt to "flank" him and gain a closer shot
as the slightest movement to that effect would
give him the alarm and I should lose the best
shot I had yet had so hastily dismounting
I took a careful aim and fired. he started to jump
fell. then jumped to his feet and ran away apparently
as brisk as ever for a few hundred yards. then.
ran slower. and evidently with great exertion and
finally stopped to take a look at us a thousand yards
away. then galloped slowly away, but knowing the
country much better than me. he was soon able to
get out of sight in some of the many ravines.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 94

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

73

Again we scared up a single one. and again
we found wind and fate against us. and although
we followed him for three or four miles he escaped
unharmed. Travelling there in the direction of camp
a mile or more we came in sight of a band of a
dozen or more in a ravine leading down to a small
stream and nearly a mile distant. We immediately
determined to try our luck again and by success-
ful maneuvering soon found ourselves in their
neighborhood without their having taken the
alarm. Dismounting in a little ravine I started
on foot to try a shot at them. after proceeding
cautiously a few rods I discovered a band of
8 or ten on the top of a little knoll directly in
front of me but too far away to make a shot
of effect. and I commenced crawling on hands
and knees towards them. keeping another knoll be
tween us and partially screening me from their
sight. I had got to a spot where I thought I
might use less caution and also gain a spot that
would afford me a good chance for a shot when
I was startled by a rush and clattering noise
and raising my head found another band of
a dozen or more almost surrounding me and
all within excellent rifle. shot. yes even good pistol
range. There they stood. three or four old bucks
their heads and long, tapering ears erect in front of
half a score of does and fawns and curiously
eyeing the picture I must have presented as I
stood on my knees. hat off. and hair sticking "seven
ways for Sunday" while my eyes must have
been "as big as saucers.." in a few seconds I
partially recovered from the effects of their first
appearance and raising my rifle. took. as I
thought, deliberate aim at one that presented the
best mark fired. and __ saw the ball strike
a hundred yards beyond. while the whole
band ran over a knoll and out of sight before
I could reload
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 95

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

74
I made up my mind that I had
been afflicted with that disease known as
"buck fever" and that I was no hunter. still
I determined to find them and get another
shot, if possible, I saw them a mile or more
away. and "flanked" them out of their position
without loss of life or limb to either party.
I then turned homeward in good earnest.
knowing that it must be near the middle of the
afternoon and supposing myself at least a dozen
miles from home. Catching a glimpse of our land.
mark. (the high mountain northeast of here) we
started in that direction expecting to find open
level country in travelling a mile or two. In
going that distance we spied a large buck
to our left nearly half a mile distant who
watched us a moment then galloped leisurely away
stopping occasionally to see if we were following
him. but feeling that it would be folly to attempt
to follow him at that time, as our horses were
already quite "played out" we kept on our way
without any disposition to molest him. In
passing over several hills I caught glimpses of
him watching us and apparently surprised at
not seeing us following him. We soon found
that we had mistaken our reckonings. and instead
of the open glades. and small timbered hills that
we had passed through in the morning we found
ourselves amid lofty hills. their tops composed
of huge masses of rocks. piled up in the most
fantastic shapes. their sides partly covered with
sturdy pines. and soon we came to the banks
of a beautiful brook of swift running water
of a reddish color. its bottoms. for two or three
miles covered with a luxuriant growth of grass
just ripe enough to make into hay. and shut
in from the vulgar [crowd?] by these same hills..
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 96

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

75

Although this was all really beautiful
and calculated to awaken in ones mind the sublim
est feelings of awe and reverence at ordinary times.
and I could not then witness. it without exper
iencing an indescribable feeling of awe.. yet my
mind was too much occupied with thoughts and
of “Home sweet Home” and every nerve and resource
strained to reach it to moralize awhile and enjoy
this scenery as much as I would like and
putting spurs to my horse I was galloping
briskly over a glade when a side glance through
an opening in the trees revealed to me two horses
without saddles or bridles. feeding on the margin
of a small stream. Knowing that Huston had
intended taking a party of our boys and going
out to remain two days. camping near Dead
Man’s Creek I thought perchance they belonged
to his party and determined to reconnoiter
cautiously. however as from recent reports it was
not improbable that Indians were in the vicinity
and should I succeed in making my way into
their midst. they might be too hospitable to allow
me to return without some flattering mark of
their respect and esteem for myself. My first
attempt was unsuccessful, not being able to obtain
a glimpse of even the horses again so taking a
circle and placing as many screens as possible
between the spot and myself I made a second
attempt and saw the horses but no men. I made
a third and fourth attempt failing to see either
horses. white men or Indians. and decided that if
white men they were able to take care of them-
selves, and, if Indians, they were in all probability
greater in number than we were and sufficiently
on their guard to prevent our surprising them. and
not being sure of our position. and the distance
we were from home I left them to graze at their
leisure. and in peace.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 97

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

76
Passing over one or two small hills we suddenly
found ourselves close to the stage road but at a
point utterly strange to us and we could not
tell how far we were from home. but in riding
a mile we found ourselves at the foot of Indian
Steps and knew that we were about 2½ miles from
the station. We then came to the conclusion that the
horses we had seen must have been some of those
that had strayed from trains or perhaps some of
those that had “played out” while escorting the
coach, had found their way to that place and
were now living “high” although not “in clover” and
regretted that we had not before known our exact
position. However tomorrow morning Hastings
and I intend to try our luck in finding and
capturing them. and should they prove to be the
ones we suspect they will be no poor prizes..
Near the foot of the hill on this side of the “Indian
Steps” we came upon a few prarie dogs who did
not seem to mind our presence in the least and
provoked at their “non-chalance” and my [illegible in original]
ill success in shooting I determined to try my luck
again. My first shot at the inoffensive little
creature. passed harmlessly over his back. causing
him to jump to the mouth of his hole. stare saucily
at me. and tauntingly wag his tail a few seconds.
but before I had emptied my charge of powder into
the barrel he was out of his hole. composedly. munch
ing a blade of grass and studiously looking in
the opposite direction.. Such evident disregard for
my presence was too much for my mind and tem
per to brook and I decided on giving him a second
lesson. and taking a deliberate aim. I was satisfied
with my prowess as a marksman at seeing him
“hunt his hole” without using one of his diminutive
hind legs and leaving behind him a trail of blood.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 98

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

77

Arriving in camp I found that Huston with
Wagner. Hardy. Flood and Vogt had left here two or
three hours later than I did for a hunt on Dead
Man’s Creek. and about sundown they returned minus
game. and having seen no game with the exception
of one elk. which Huston missed twice..
No mail today. not even an “Official” docu-
ment.. Frank. Clark passed down on the coach
this morning having been as far west as Fort
Halleck. This evening I made out an affidavit for
Lieut Hill.



Thursday September 28th /65

This morning Hastings and I went out
after the horses seen yesterday and after some
little trouble succeeded in catching them. One
of them proved to be Kendall’s old horse the other
a [Govt?] Horse abandoned by someone else. We
brought them in. and on our way back saw two
huge blacktailed deer.. The coach from Denver arrived
at about 11 A.M. bringing among other official docu
ments an order detailing me on a Gen. Court Martial
to be held at Denver City and which is to convene
on Monday next. I learned this from Capt. Loomis
on Saturday last and also that Lieut Masten was
included and seeing an “Official” envelope addressed
to him I concluded that he would receive his
order tonight and so requested him through the
escort to send me word when he would come
down. This afternoon I called in and visited
with Mrs Taylor. and remained to supper.
The day has been quite cold and very windy
A train belonging to the Stage Company came
up today and camped. A party of packers came
down this morning. Capt. Clark took a U S horse
away from one on request of Capt Fisher
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 99

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

79
Friday September 29th 65

This morning I received word from Masten
that he would be down on to night’s coach and
I have consequently been busy in getting ready
to accompany him. Settled up with Capt Clark
this afternoon and found that I owed him $9.81 on
account of the mess. and $15.00 on “Jim’s” account.
Traded my rifle to Monaghan for a small
revolver. and sold my Buffalo Robe to Sheley and
considered myself ready to start.. The day has
been calm and pleasant. Huston and four others
went out this morning intending to remain over
night.. No mail on todays coach..


Fremont House. Denver City
Tuesday October 1st 1865

Friday night about one o’clock the
coach from Salt Lake arrived at Virginia Dale
and I accordingly bade adieu to Virginia Dale
and its inhabitants. for a time, at least. Masten
was aboard and one other passenger. the night
was cold and the ride very uncomfortable until
we reached Parke Station about daylight. Then
we changed drivers. and remained until the drivers
ate their breakfast. met Lieut Tubbs. but Masten
and I did not get breakfast as we intended to
remain at Fort Collins until the next coach. On
reaching Fort Collins about 9. oclock we found
Capt. Carpenter and Lieuts Canfield and McNaughton all
ready to start and concluded to keep right on. We
passed Sherwood’s Big. Thompson. Little Thompson and
reached Burlington or St. Vrain's at about 2:30 PM
where we got an excellent dinner which made
the subsequent journey much more endurable
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 100

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

80

Sherwood’s is a mere swing station the
only building I could see being the one in which
the stage company Keeps its stock. Half a dozen or
more Indian Tepee’s or wigwams stood near by
and a number of half naked. half breeds were
scattered around.. At Big and Little Thompson’s
quite decent settlements are made and considerable
farming seems to be carried on at Big Thompson
I saw several nice stacks of wheat and hay.
At St. Vrain’s there is quite a decent sized
hamlet and an extension settlement around it..
Here was a tavern. blacksmith shop store saloon
and half a dozen or more dwelling houses in the
village. and nice buildings on nearly all the
farms around it... These settlements all derive
their names from those of the streams on which they
are built which are pure mountain streams.
clear and cold. Several more such streams. the
Boulder. Rocky. and Elder creeks were passed between
St Vrains and Denver. We stopped for supper at
Churche’s eleven miles from here at about 7. P.M.
and arrived here at 10 P.M. Met the outward
bound coach at Churche’s.. Capt Carpenter. Lieut
McNaughton and Canfield arrived this afternoon.
Met Capt Clipperton. Capt. Cox and Lieut Sessions
today. Sessions starts for Leavenworth with
Gen Dodge tomorrow.
The man who came down with us from Va Dale
for
was one who had been cutting hay from the Gov’t at Ft Bridges
and was crazy by spells. At Church’s he got a notion
that some of them were going to hang him and asked
Masten to help him. At the Planters last this morning
he got the same idea again and ran far away.
Before he could be brought back. One would think
he had been guilty of some crime that lay uneasy
on his mind. Another passenger a Mr Chaplin return
ing from Bannack came down with us
from Sherwoods.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 101

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

81
Denver City
Monday Sept Oct. 2

This morning McNaughton and I went to
Maj. Walden’s office at as early a hour as possible
and put in a request for our pay. which we received
up to August 31st giving me $364.30. We also made
a visit to some clothing stores in search of sashes
which we were required to have. and which we
finally succeeded in obtaining.. At twelve o’clock
the court met to organized and adjourned to meet
at 10. o’clock tomorrow. Day warm and clear.
Butterfield’s coach drew up this morning and
proved to be a pretty good rig with four splen
did horses. fully as good if not better than
Holladay’s Overland Mail. the horses are branded
“B.O.D.” and the coaches have. “Butterfields
Overland Dispatch” painted on the sides. They
are built in a different style from Holladays
coaches. being more like a very large covered
ambulance. and calculated for the carrying
of large loads of freight. as well as passengers
Gen. Dodge left this morning for Leavenworth
and the 13th Mo. Cav. passed through town from
the east..
This morning. Col. Potter who is to be relieved
by Maj Gen. Upton. in the command of the
district and who proceeds at once to Utah.
sent a request to have all the officers of the Mich
Cav. in the city to meet him at his Head Quarters
No reason was assigned for the request and we
could not imagine its object. but accordingly
met him at his rooms.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 102

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

82

On arriving there he proceeded to take our
names, rank, and Cos. then turning to me asked
the date of my promotion. how long I had been
in the service. and finally whether I desired to
remain or not. After some little hesitation I told
him I would not object to remaining until
next spring. He studied a moment, then. taking
his pencil. wrote under my name. “To be mustered
out.” He next asked Lieut Masten. the same quest
tions and upon receiving a reply that he would
as leif remain as not. made a check with
his pencil against his name. He then asked
Lieut McNaughtons some questions and informed
him that he would be mustered out as soon as
possible. Turning to Canfield he told him that
he “must remain whether he wanted to or not”
and made a similar remark to Captain.s Car
penter and Clipperton. He then informed us
that all who received an official communication
to the effect that their names were included on the
list of officers to remain in the service with
the detachment. would join the command in
Utah as soon as this Court Martial was dissolved
and the others would be mustered out..
Capts. Carpenter and Clipperton and Lieut Masten were
much disappointed at the Colonels decision and
at the prospect of going to Utah..
A stroll around the city proves it to be more
extensive than we expected to find it. and much
better built It is all good enough excepting
the streets which need cleaning sadly.
Large auction rooms are constantly full and
sales seem brisk while large brick stores, two
stories in highth with large sales rooms are
well filled with excellent stacks of goods. and
one would hardly imagine himself several
hundred miles west of civilization..
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 103

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

83

Tuesday October 3d /65

This morning the court met pursuant
to adjournment and all the members were
present. As we are likely to remain together
some considerable length of time I may find
it pleasant at some future times to call to mind
the names of the members and will here chronicle
them for future reference.
Lieut Col. C. Fitzsimons 21st New York Cav.
Capt. Jas S. Carpenter 7th Mich Cav.
″ Andrew. Smith 21st New York. Cav.
1st Lieut Jas. Ronalds ″ ″ ″ ″
″ ″ Benjamin ″ ″ ″ ″
″ ″ Frank [Murrell?] V.R. 1st Colorado″
″ ″ Henry Canfield 7th Michigan ″
″ ″ Daniel McNaughton R.Q.M. 7th Mich. ″
″ ″ John B Masten ″ ″ ″
2 ″ Edwin B Havens ″ ″ ″
Capt Wm H. Clipperton ″ ″ ″ Judge
Advocate of the court.
Lieut Col Fitzsimmons being the senior officer
in rank is President of the court.
The prisoner was brought into court heavily ironed
and proved to be a medium sized man with light
brown hair. fair complexion. and black or very
dark hazel eyes. a combination I never see unless
I think of a crafty. violent temper. and one to
whom revenge is sweeter than life. and yet as
I looked at him it seemed hardly possible that
he could have been guilty of the great crimes
charged against him and for which he is now
to be tried. His name is Charles W. Squires. and
is an unassigned recruit of the 2nd Col. Cav.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 104

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

84

He is charged with murdering Capt.
Soule of the Col. Cav. then a Provost Marshall
of this city and afterwards deserting.. After the
court was called to order. the order convening it
was read. and the prisoner asked if he had any
objections to make against any of its members.
to which he replied in the negative. He then
told the Judge Advocate that he should like to
ask an adjournment until the 5th for the pur
pose of procuring counsel. stating that no notice
of the time of his trial had been given him. or he should
[illegible in original] have been prepared to proceed to trial at
once. Upon motion of Capt Smith the Court voted
to adjourn until the 5th at 10 A.M.
After dinner Masten and I went to work
on his papers and partly finished his Ordnance
Account.
A couple who have been boarding here some
time are to be married tonight. The day has been
very warm.


Wednesday October 4th 1865

Helped Masten on his papers until noon
when we had finished his Ordnance papers. Did
nothing during the afternoon not even to go up town.
Day warm and cloudy until sundown when a
rain storm set in which has continued all the evening
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 105

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

85
Thursday October 5th /65

This morning on coming down stairs
I found Capts Ballard and Birney. Dr. Smith
and Charley Pratt in the bar room. They had
come down for the purpose of drawing their pay
before going to Utah. Charley brought Capts Carpen
ter. and Clipperton and Canfield's and Masten orders
to remain. From him I learned who were going
to remain in the service. The Captains are Carpen
ter, Clipperton, Birney and Glover. 1st Lieuts. Hill. Dun
nett. Canfield and Masten. 2nd Lieuts Buck. Ferris.
Tubbs and Frank Clark. They could not get
their pay and Birney and Smith went back this
afternoon on the coach. Pratt and Ballard remain
until tomorrow.
Court Martial met at ten o'clock but Col Fitz
Simons. Capt. Smith and Lieut Ronalds being absent
we adjourned until 2 P.M. at which time we
met only to adjourn. until ten oclock. Ike Cooke
Esqr. the counsel for the prisoner being ill and unable
to attend. Capt Clipperton asked permission to
employ counsel for the behalf of the prosecution
which was carried by a vote of the members
Received a letter from Frank Clark. and
also one from Capt Loomis today.
Day cool after last night's shower which
proved to be quite a heavy one
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 106

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865


86

Friday October 6th 1865

Pratt and Ballard started for home this morning
feeling pretty well used up. if I can judge from
appearances. Court Martial met at ten. but as
Mr Cooke was unable to attend motion was made
to adjourn until [illegible in original] next which was
adopted. Received a letter from Nell this morn
ing and answered it this afternoon.
A man was found drowned this morning
in the Platte river near the foot of ["F"? "T"?] street.
and rumor says he committed suicide on
account of family troubles. His name was Holman
and was a partner in the ferry of Gerry and Holman
on the Platte where we crossed on our way to Fort
Collins..
The day has been very pleasant and the
house full. Went up to Chamberlain's Photograph
Gallery and sat for Photos with Canfield and
Masten..


Saturday October 7th 65

Having nothing to do today have found
the matter time passing very heavily on my hands.
The day has been warm. No mail for any
one today.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 107

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

87
Sunday October 8th 1865

This morning we all attended Sabbath
School at the Presbyterian church and afterwards
services at the Methodist and this evening went
again to the services at the M.E. Church.
This was the first time that I had attended
religious services in a church for nearly three
years and it seemed a great contrast to the
Sabbath scenes we have been accustomed to during
this long interval. and to see the people old and
young congregated at such a place brought back
memories that are not always present with
me. and brought forth a strong desire to once
again become a civilian Our present life is
as unlike that of a soldiers in the field as it
is possible to conceive Here we are almost our own
masters for the time being and fear not the order
to move at once to some unknown part of the
world..

Monday October 9th 1865

Court met at ten oclock this morning.. all the
members being present and the prisoner in court.
Capt. Clipperton then stated that Mr Cook had
been compelled by severe illness to abandon the defence
of the prisoner. but said that if the court would
adjourn until half past one this afternoon Mr
Ham Hunt would appear and conduct the
case in behalf of the prisoner.
Accordingly at half past one the court met
again when Mr Hunt appeared. and being granted
permission to address a few remarks to the court
stated his reasons for asking an adjournment
of the case until tomorrow morning.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 108

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

88

He gave his reasons for asking this adjourn
ment his utter ignorance of the facts in the case. and
of the mode of defence the prisoner had decided on. and
also stated that Mr. Hallett who had formerly attemp
ted to conduct the defence had papers that might
materially assist him in his case. After a few
remarks from the Judge Advocate and the President
the Judge Advocate asked that the court be
cleared which was done and after a deliberation
of a few moments it was thought best to grant
the request of Mr Hunt and the court adjourned..
Immediately after supper I walked down to
the rooms to see if there was any mail. and perceiv-
ing a crowd lower down the street went down. when
I found that a man who had but just arrived
in town. while taking a rifle from his wagon had
accidentally discharged it. the ball passing into
his neck and almost instantly killing him..
The fore part of the day was warm and clear
but the afternoon and evening cool and cloudy and
apparently indicating a storm of some kind.


Tuesday October 10th 1865

At daylight I awoke and found it rain
ing quite hard. and on coming down to breakfast
found the old shell leaking like a [riddle?]. Soon after
breakfast "Port" Brown came in with the intelligence
that Squires, our prisoner, had escaped during the
night and on meeting at the Court Room it was
officially announced by the Judge Advocate.. It was
found that he had been insufficiently guarded
through the neglect of the Provost Marshal. and
charges were immediately prepared by the
Judge Advocate against the Provost Marshal
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 109

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865


89

Capt. C.S. Moore 13th Missouri Cavalry. which if
they bring him to trial before this court will
inevitably discharge dismiss him from the service
He has but lately been appointed to the position
but has already shown himself deficient in respect
to the uniform he wears and to himself as a gentleman.
Almost his first act was to appear in the public
streets by day in company that caused more than
a thousand fingers to be pointed at him. and every
one wearing the uniform of an officer to feel the
sense of shame and dishonor to which he seemed perfectly
oblivious..
No trace of the prisoner has yet been
discovered and no hopes are found entertained that
he will be found. That he had assistance no one
can doubt and his accomplices have undoubtedly
taken every pains to hide all traces of the direction
he hast taken. Although we felt that no blame
could be attached to us, yet we could not be blind
to the fact that suspicions would be cast at
us and to have received an order dissolving the
Court would have been hailed as a favor to us
by almost every one.
Towards noon the storm ceased and the
sky almost clear again. but it is much cooler
than we have before seen it here.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 110

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

90

Wednesday October 11th 1865

Court met at ten A M. as usual to adjourn
their being no business that could be brought before
it. A little after noon Lieut House arrived from
Fort Collins.. making it his business to get Muster
Out Rolls for the use of the men to be mustered out.
and also to see if he could not immediately muster
out. himself. This has been about the only thing
that is beyond the usual occurrences of every day.



Thursday October 12th /65

Court met and adjourned as usual this
morning and nothing unusual occurred in
the town that I know of. No news from any
portion of the country.



Friday October 13th /65

Court met this morning and adjourned
until Monday at ten o'clock there being nothing
to be done. Gen. Connnor and staff. arrived in town
last evening and a grand supper is to be given
them at the Planter's House tomorrow evening.
A ball was held at the Union Hall last night
but I did not hear of it until it was too late
to attend. Day warm.

Saturday October 14th 1865

Day as usual very dull; nothing to do.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 111

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

91

Sunday October 15th 1865

Morning cool. cloudy and rainy. continued so
nearly all day. Did not go to church. or do anything
but read.. Afternoon very rainy. large numbers
of arrivals from different parts of the territory. con
sisting principally of delegates to the convention
for the nomination of candidates for Governor and
senator for the territory which meets in the city
tomorrow.
The supper at the Planter's House last eve
ning created quite a stir in the town. Did
not go. as I thought it not worth my time..
About nine in the evening the band struck
up some one of the National airs. and a cannon
was fired nine times as a salute..


Monday. October 16th /65

Court met this morning as per adjournment.
when the Judge Advocate informed us that to
morrow morning the case of Capt. C S. Moore
13th Mo. Cavalry. formerly Acting Provost Marshall of
the city would be brought up for trial. Capt
Moore was Provost Marshal when Squires escaped
and is to be tried for "Neglect of Duty". and is
charged with having permitted the escape of
Squires. and also with having allowed one Corporal
Bain. of the 3d Batt. of Cal. Inf. who was awaiting
sentence of court on the charge of murder to
appear in the streets without guard and
in citizen's clothes..
Day more pleasant than yesterday.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 112

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

92

Tuesday October 17th /65

This morning the case of Capt Moore was
opened. the accused appearing in court and intro
ducing as his counsel Mr. Geo. W Miller Esqr of this
city. a man who reminds one of Uriah Huck
in Dicken's "David Copperfield". or Irwin's. "Icha-
bod Crane." Capt Moore pleaded not guilty to
the charge and both specifications and the court
proceeded to trial. [examing?] as witnesses for the
prosecution. Sergt McNally of the Col. Infantry
and Corporal Thompson of the 21st N.Y. Cav.
Day pleasant. Engaged a pair of books..


Wednesday October 18th 1865

Continued case of Capt Moore. Prosecution
closed soon after noon having examined as witnesses
Corp. Thompson 21st N.Y Cav. Capt Hawley Col. Cav.
and Actg Ord. Officer at this post. Mr. Chas G. Cox and
Capt McDougal. 5th U.S. Vol. Infantry. acting [Opt.?]
Provost Marshal of this city and the Judge Advocate
The defence opened with the examination of
Corp. Thompson. after which the court adjourned..
Received a letter last night from E.T.
Mr. C F. Parkhurst. Proprietor of the "Fremont House"
returned this afternoon from a tour of prospecting
for [Platina?] in New Mexico. bringing with him
a large collection of specimens..
Lieut House started for Camp Collins tonight..
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 113

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865


93
Thursday October 19th 1865

This morning I was struck with the
exceedingly gloomy appearance of everything. and
could not for some time imagine the cause. It seemed
as though a storm was imminent but upon glancing
at the sky no clouds were to be seen. the sun was
well up in the heavens. and I was considerably puzzled
to account for this strange phenomenon.. At length
some one spoke of the eclipse of the sun. and on the
first glance one could imagine that he saw a spot
upon its disc. yet he could not bear to look at it long
with the naked eye. By means of a smoked glass.
we could see that about three fourths of the surface
of the sun was obscured. It lasted until about nine
o'clock when it became clear and has been a most
beautiful day ever since..
The trial of Capt Moore occupied our time
today. the defence having the time and examining
as its witnesses. Sergt McNally. Corp Thompson.
Corp. Winters. 21st N.Y. Cav. Sergt Ryan 3d Cal. Vol. Inf.
Private Douglas 21st NY. Provost Marshal is clerk.
and Mr. [Rising?] citizen clerk in Quartermaster's
Department. at this post..
To many of our men this has been a day
numbered as one of the the anniversary of one
of the hardest fought. battles and most brilliant
victories as during their whole military career.
that of the Battle of Cedar Creek Va..
Received a letter from Capt Clark this morning
dated Virginia Dale. October 16th in which he
says they are waiting for Muster Out Rolls
and orders.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 114

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865


94
Thursday October 26th 1865

Since last I wrote in this diary things
have gone on in their usual way with us. the
same old hum drum style seeming to prevail.
On Friday last we closed the case of Capt H.
S. Moore. and adjourned until Monday. The
unanimous verdict of the court in the case was
Guilty of charge and specification and the sen
tence, adopted after somewhat lengthy debate
upon the question was "Dismissal from the service"
Some of the members opposed the sentence
through a feeling of pity for the unfortunate man
as he clearly proved his devotion to the cause
of our country. and his previous good conduct
as an officer by his witnesses. and it does
really seem hard. He entered the service from
the interior of Missouri at the commencement
of the rebellion. when to be a Union man in
Missouri was considered a crime. has served
in the ranks of the Union army. and risen
to his present rank. participating in the
hardest of the hard fought battles of the
south and west supporting his own family
and that of his widowed Mother on the insuffi
cient pay of an army officer and had he
proved himself a thorough officer and one
to whom duty to the interest of the government
was his greatest aspirations he would have
proven himself one worthy the respect of
every brother in arms. But this one act
which to some may seem palliated by his
former good conduct seems, to me, less
excusable by this same good reputation
he has hitherto sustained and every tittle
of evidence he produced to prove his previous
good character. deepens my conviction that
he was more culpable in this

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 115

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

An officer having served nearly four
years. should have acquired sufficient experience
to know that he was responsible for the con
duct of the non-commissioned officers and men
under him. which fact it was clearly proven
Capt Moore. either had forgotten or wilfully
neglected. His leaving a military prisoner [illegible in original]
in which was confined prisoners one of whom
was already convicted of and another charged
with. the most heinous crime that can be
committed against society and law. that of
Murder. exclusively to the control of men, of
whom. he knew nothing at all. and permitting
those men to allow one of these men to appear
at large on the public streets. in day light
wearing citizens clothes and unaccompanied
by any one responsible for this safe keeping
and the other to escape from the prison
at an early hour of the night seems to me
the most extraordinary. act of an officer.
His plea that he was conducting the govern
ment of the prison on the same line of regu-
lations as his predecessor seems to me absurd
An officer having the same experience that
he claims to have should have at once. had
his own reputation. to say nothing of the
interests of the Government. at stake
sufficient to have changed the regulations
of that prison. so as to have prevented all
these things. All this Capt Moon neglected
and the result is thus shown.
Sunday afternoon Lieut Canfield and
myself took a ride some four or five
miles out into the country towards Santa
Fe. or rather on the road leading that way
We found several farms in a good state
of cultivation. and seeming to show a
degree of civilization such as we have not
frequently met with
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 116

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

Monday we did nothing. Our
Judge Advocate informed us that on Tues
day he should open the case of Joseph Pollock
[Vet.?] Batt. 1st Col. Cav. charged with the murder
of Private Stockwell of the same organization
ly
and on Tuesday morning the case was according^
opened by the usual proceedings of swearing
the court and introducing. Messr. Cavanaugh
and Brown. Attorneys of this city as counsel for
ed
the accused. the court on some excuse then adjourn^
until Wednesday morning at ten o'clock. when it
was informed that Mr Brown was too ill to attend
and Mr Cavanaugh was obliged to abandon the defence
as he was called to another part of the territory
on professional business. Mr Chas G. Cox then
took up the defence and applied for an adjournment
until 2 oclock P.M. which was granted. and
yesterday afternoon and today until noon we have
been occupied with the evidence for the Prosecution.
On Monday afternoon. Maj Warner. and Lieut
Pratt arrived in the city. having removed with
that part of the command left at Camp Collins
to [Clear?] Creek. five miles from the city Charley
remained over night and on Tuesday Lieut
Lyon. Pratt and the Chaplain came down. and
in the afternoon Lieut Henry and Lieut Blake
of the 1st Michigan arrived from Fort Halleck.
Wednesday Charley Pratt and Capt Sergt
came down and were detailed on a Board of
Survey. and remained over night: This after
noon Maj Warner. Capt Carpenter McCormick
and Lieut Lyon came down again and still
remain. Tuesday evening the Denver Theater
opened. the company performing. the "Lady of Lyons"
to a crowded house. I attended and found the
play quite good. although somewhat inferior
in my opinion to the same performed by Mc
Farland's company at Grand Rapids.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 117

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

Tuesday was stormy. the street being
quite muddy and few ladies were present
at the theater. Last night was still worse
and I did not attend. The play advertised
last night was “Ingomar”: tonight it is
“Lucille” This morning when I came down
to breakfast I found about 3 inches of snow
and the morning was quite cold the day proving
very disagreeable Last Friday night I
attended a ball at the “Union Hall” which
proved to be a very slim affair.
We now understand that the regiment is to
be mustered out here. and furnished with
transportation to the state rendezvous to receive
final payment


Tuesday November 15th 1865

The events of each day follow each other in
such a monotonous channel that seem scarcely
worth chronicling. and I have neglected to write
them down as they occur each successive day
On Monday October 31st our Judge Advocate
closed the prosecution of Joseph Pollock. and
the court then proceeded to consider its verdict. After
a short deliberation a verdict of justifiable homicide was
returned. I have since learned that the finding of the
court has been published and Pollock set at liberty
During the past week the officers of our regiment
have been busy getting transportation for the men
to the Missouri river then to muster out.
On Wednesday the 1st Michigan detachment
started. and on Friday Morning Capt Sergeant with
Co’s “A.” H. “M. “[S?]” started. this morning. “B” D.” and [“S”?]
started and. Tuesday morning the remainder
will leave.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 118

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

Last Tuesday morning Major Latta issued
orders relieving Lieut McNaughton and myself
from duty on the court Martial and ordering us
to report to our regimental commanders. I
reported to Major Darling who at once gave me
permission to remain here until the command left
their present camp. Tuesday. evening a party of us
met Capt Clipperton at his rooms by his invitation
where he regaled us with choice drinks and quite
a pleasant evening was passed.. Capt Clark
arrived by the coach on Monday night and
remained at the Planter’s Hotel that night but
removed here next day. He was wounded by
an accidental shot a while after I left Virginia
Dale. and is now. under the care of the Post Sur-
geon. and will remain until fit for duty again.
During the first days of the week we had very
bad weather. cold. stormy. disagreeable days. but
for three or four days past we have had very
beautiful weather and today is more like May
than November..
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 119

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

Tuesday November 7th 1865

At length we are away from Denver and
“Homeward Bound” All day yesterday we were busy
getting ready to leave. Crocker contracted for teams to take
the men and everything being in readiness the camp
was broken up about 1 P.M. and moved to near the
city to wait until this morning when after a great
deal of delay we got the men into the wagons and
about noon we bade adieu to Denver and started
out on our journey of seven hundred miles with
mingled feelings of pleasure, hope and fear.. Pleasure
at knowing that this is to be our last march and that
it commenced under such pleasant prospects: the
weather being very fine; hope that we might have as
good weather until we reach Leavenworth and fear
that we may see much worse ere we reach there.
The weather has been really beautiful for several days
and all have felt impatient to be moving but todays
march has convinced us that we could not have gained
much had we started several days ago as the roads
were then badly cut up and are now nearly dry.
We stopped for a few moments at Lake Station six
miles from Denver when the landlord complained of the
conduct of the 1st in taking everything they fancied..
We marched fourteen miles to.day and are now
camped on the bank of the dry bed of some stream.
A small pond is near by. which affords water
for our animals. We have seventeen teams engaged to
take the men comprising a part of the trains of [Myers?] and
[Brother?] [Spratland?] and Johnson. and Murphy.
A few emigrants from California and Montana are
travelling with us. and altogether we have a force of
about two hundred men quite well armed.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 120

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

Wednesday. November 8th 1865

This morning Maj Warner routed us out before
four o’clock thinking it was later but at daylight we
were off. The morning was quite cold but clear and the
middle of the day was sufficiently warm to make over
coats uncomfortable but it grew quite cool again
towards night.. We are travelling by the “Cut off.” from
Denver to the Junction and off course water and
feed is somewhat scarce. We have crossed several dry
beds of streams to.day which if ever filled must be
quite large streams. Have made a march of Thirty
two miles to.day and are now camped at Living
Spring’s Station.. the only living water between last nights
camp and the Junction.. Here we have a stage station
and two ranches.. When we arrived we found that we
could obtain some beefsteak so I sent “Jim” over to
the ranch to get some. and found that it cost 20 cts
per pound while potatoes were sold for 15¢ per pound
The freighters buy hay for the teams which they pay
[69?] per pound for. Met larger trains to day going to Denver
and tonight a large ox train is camped on the flats
near us.. A little while before we reached here we
came upon a band of eight Antelope feeding near the
road, very unexpectedly, and as they appeared very tame
we were much surprised and some of our party said
they were not Antelopes but were goats belonging to
the ranche but afterwards all came to the conclusion
that they were antelope.

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 121

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865


Thursday November 9th 1865

This morning Maj Warner did not get in so
great a hurry. yet we were all up long before daylight
and under weigh at seven o'clock, the day has been
much warmer than yesterday. and over coats are super
fluous a great part of the day. Large bands of Antelope
have been hovering near the road all day and appear
to be very tame.. The men and the emigrants have
great times chasing them. One of the Californians shot
one to.day. and Brigham brought it in for him..
Maj. Warner. Maj. Sproule. Charley Pratt. and some
others had quite a chase after a band of them today
Maj Warners dog. "Nellie" a beautiful young Greyhound
joining in the sport and chasing them well..
Continue to meet heavy trains going up many of them
loaded with steam machinery. suitable for mining
purposes. Camped near the Big Wells on the
Bijou. which here is a small muddy stream. We
were told that there was no water in the stream
but that we could obtain water from wells near
the road. but on arriving here we found the wells
choked up with boards sticks and other rubbish
and on examination found a good camping ground
a quarter of a mile from the wells. and found water
in the stream which must have come down within
a very few days. There is also a fine grove of timber
along the banks of the stream and we have got a
jolly good fire tonight.. [illegible in original] Brown shot a big
"Jackrabbitt" when we first came into camp
Marched Twenty five miles to..day
Learned today that the 1st had committed
several depredations on the road when they
[illegible in original] down..
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 122

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

Friday November 10th 1865

Broke camp about seven Oclock this morn
ing and reached the Junction at noon where we
stopped to draw rations and forage.
The day has been some cooler than yesterday was
though clear and pleasant. Rode up to Camp [Wardonel?]
which I find to be the best fitted up of any post I
have seen since leaving Cottenwood Springs last
July.. the men have good barracks. the horses good
stables. and the different departments. Quarter master
Commissaries Blacksmith shops. Hospital and lastly,
but not leastly the Sutlers. all seem complete.
One section of a battery consisting of 3 inch [rifled?]
steel guns is stationed here.
Almost the first man I saw on riding into
camp was Rozelle late Lt. Col. 15th N.Y. Cav. whom
I met in Denver when he was trying to pass
himself off for some one who had been a great
military man. and was then a great nabob. but
whom when the truth was know had'n't a rag of
clothing that he could call his own were his
debts paid.. He is now employed here as Superin
tendent of the forage department and was strutting
across the camp as though he had more responsibil
ity. on his shoulders than Gen. Grant ever did..
Capt Bullard Lieut Bentley Capt McCormick
H. DeGraff and others joined us tonight from
Camp Collins. Dr. Upjohn who came down with
Smith waited here until we came up.. Smith has
been gone since yesterday morning. Capt. Sergeant
about four days and the 1st Mich one day in
advance of Capt S.. .. I noticed this morn
ing that where the road crossed the Bijou there was
no water. and going a little way up the stream
found when it sunk into the ground.
Marched 18 miles to..day
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 123

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

Saturday. November 11th /65

We left the Junction at daylight this
morning and have marched 28 miles. And
now in camp at Godfrey's Ranch.. The day has
been warm and pleasant and the march as
usual pleasant and agreeable. The Adjt this
morning detailed me as Officer of the day. but the
duties. prescribed are very light and easy to perform
Antelope were thicker than ever to.day hovering
near the roads in large bands. So after dinner
Majs Warner and Sproule Charley Pratt Carpenter
and some others struck out after some and
succeeded in bringing in two fine bucks. Sheley
wounded one and Jim and George ran him down
and caught him so that Antelope mutton is plenty
in camp to..night. The Ranchman Mr. Godfrey
came down and offered to dress the two Maj Sproule
killed for one of the fields. Crocker and I attempted
to get an Antelope this afternoon but they being
on the plains we could not get close enough
to them to get a good shot.. This forenoon. while
riding along we frightened a Jackrabbitt. and
a number of us started to follow him but soon
lost sight of him. but soon after came upon
a village of prarie dogs. among which we espied
a badger and Lieut Bentley shot at him... While
attempting to secure him we found and Killed
two large rattlesnakes. and scared another
Jackrabbitt. Met more and larger trains
than on any day of our march.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 124

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

Sunday November 12th 1865

The morning proved. cold. misty and generally
disagreeable. broke camp at sunrise and reached Valley
Station or Fort Moon at one P.M. and went into camp
for remainder of the day. This morning L. Lyon releived
me as Officer of the day. Mr Godfrey reported a great
amount of damage done him by the 1st Mich who
tore down his fence and stock pen for fuel. We had
sent in a bill of damages. amounting to a hundred
dollars against them. Maj Warner in consideration
of these reports gave strict orders against the molestation
of any property by our men and charged the officers
with the superintending of the conduct of their men. He
also had Charley draw up a paper for the different [ranche?]
men where we might camp. to sign.. certifying that the
detachment commanded by Maj. Warner had committed
no depredations at their ranche's. This paper Mr Godfrey
signed. and also complimented the men very highly on
their good conduct. saying they had behaved the most
gentlemanly of any detachment of troops that had ever camped
19
there. We marched 27 miles today making the same march
that we did on this same ground last July.. the day
continued quite cool. and but few felt disposed to leave
the train. Capt. Moore's Co of the 13th Mo. Cav. is stationed
here. and I met him here. this afternoon.. He is now at
work preparing his accounts against the time when his
sentence shall be published. He has been informed of the
finding of the Court. by some means and feels sad over it
thinking it unjust but I could not sympathize with
him very much..
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 125

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

Monday November 13th 1865

This morning it was quite cool but grew warmer
and the day proved quite warm and pleasant. Our march
to.day brought us to Hiteman's Ranch. 28 miles from
Valley Station.. The march now begins to grow monotonous
but little game is seen. the country is unvaried. The Platte
on our left and the low hills on our right are the
same that we saw last July. and nothing seems
changed.. Major Darling passed down on the coach
yesterday afternoon. reaching Valley Station about 3. P.M.
and took a run up to camp while the coach changed
horses.. He went on proposing to stop at Cottonwood
where he will probably join Capt Sergeant..
Moon and [illegible in original] at Valley Station cheerfully signed
the papers drawn up yesterday morning which was presen
ted by Capt McCormick Officer of Day.. and said that they
were well pleased with the conduct of the men. Complaints
are heard everywhere of the conduct of the 1st and all
seem to lay the blame of their conduct on Lt Col
Duggan.. We still continue to meet heavy trains
loaded with machinery. merchandize and grain flour
and other provisions bound for Denver. and late
last night we heard a large train moving past
our camp.. this morning we met one large train
having the best wagons I have ever seen used for
this purpose..
The westward bound Coach arrived at Valley
Station just after daylight loaded with passengers
and mail. Maj Darling brought word that orders had
been received at Denver retaining Maj. Warner and Sproule
and Lt Col. Duggan of the 1st for the new organization
Not very cheerful news to them. They will still go
with us until orders are received for them to return
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 126

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

Tuesday November 14th 1865

Tonight we find ourselves near the Julesburg
Buckeye Ranch. two miles before Julesburg and
22 miles from our last night's encampment.
We arrived at Julesburg at noon. and found
it much improved since our visit last July.
Large buildings of sun dried brick have been erected
to serve as quarters for the men. stables for horses and
stone houses. for supplies. and hospitals. A beautiful
two story adobe mansion has been erected with Gothic
roof. and is now occupied as HdQ'rt'r's.. Gen Wheaton
Com'd'g Dist. of Nebraska. arrived from Fort Laramie about
the same time that we did. and a salute of artillery was
fired in honor of his arrival.. Today is election day
in Colorado. and the Polls were open when we arrived
and opportunity was offered for us to vote. but I
know of none who did so. Drew supplies of rations
and grain. but could not get any hay either at
the post or ranche. so we were obliged to turn
our animals loose to graze. the first time since
leaving Living Springs..
The day has been warm and pleasant. and
large bands of antelope have been seen..
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 127

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

Wednesday November 15th 1865

To night we are camped at Diamond
Springs two miles below [Boureaux’?] at the Old
California Crossing. having marched 27 miles
It was the intention to camp at [Boureaux?] where
hay could be obtained but as he asked 69 per pound
the freighters would not pay it and came down
here where we find good grazing. Diamond
Springs is a stage Station and consists of only
a barn and quarters for the guard.
The coaches passed each way during the night.
The ranche man at the Buckeye complained of the
men taking some poles last night but on examination
this morning concluded that none had been taken
and signed the paper without a murmur.



Thursday November 16th 1865

Today has been windy, cool and very disagree
able. the worst day we have seen since leaving
Denver.. Near Mound station we saw the dead
bodies of two Indians who were a part of eight
killed in an attack upon a train in the sand
hills near Diamond Springs. We marched
to.day 27 miles and are now encamped at
Alkali Station.. of which we have heard so much.
Two or three large freight trains are camped
near here. and quarters for a large number of
men are built here. I can not remember any
thing of this place when we went up here
last July.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 128

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865


Friday November 17th 1865

Today has been pleasant again and we have
had considerable sport in chasing wolves and rabbits
over the prarie. Coyotes and “Jackrabbitts” are
very abundant on the plains now. and the Coyotes
never fail to give us a serenade every night. and
always succeed in making “night hideous” with
their unearthly howlings..
Have marched 28 miles today and are camped
at Fremont’s Springs. 3½ miles below OFallon’s
Bluffs. where we encamped for a day on our journey
up. last summer. Although they tell us that this
ranche was here last July I remember nothing
of it. There is now quite a little settlement here.
There are two ranches a stage station and eating
house for passengers and a military post at which
one company of the 7th Iowa. Cavalry is now stationed.
In a little slough near this ranche we found a
large number of Ducks and snipes. and several of us
tried our hands at Killing some. Lieut Bentley shot
a duck. and so did Capt Ballard. and several close
shots were fired at Snipes.. We found the old Ranche
at OFallon’s Bluffs looking lonesome. many alterations
had taken place since we stopped there last summer.
The soldiers are gone. also the sutlers and the old
store was nearly empty of goods.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 129

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

Sunday November 19th 1865

Yesterday morning we left Fremont's Springs or nearly
there, and the command reached there making a march
of 32 miles. The day was very pleasant and we
had our usual morning chase after Coyotes. At noon
we stopped at the Junction House. opposite the junction
of the two plattes 12 miles above Cottonwood. and
kept by Jack Morrow. an old. chum of Wm Taylor
at Va Dale. and on mentioning the fact that I was
acquainted with Will we soon became acquainted
and upon his invitation Carpenter and I remained
all night. Towards night. Capts Porter and Cool late
of the 1st Nebraska Cav. came there and proving to
be “jolly, good fellows” we passed a very pleasant
evening. This morning we came on stopping at Cotton
wood Springs for dinner Capt Cool this morning
wished to hire “Jim” and as he offered good
terms. and Jim wished to stay I paid him off and
left him at Capt Cool’s ranche 5 miles below
Cottonwood Springs.. We stopped for supper ten
miles above here and reached camp soon after dark,
finding the command at [illegible in original] Smiths ranche
25 miles below Cottonwood having ridden 37 miles
today. Gen Wheaton was expected at Cottonwood
Springs when we stopped there and just before reaching
the ranche where we ate supper we heard a salute of
artillery from the direction of the Springs and sup
posed it to be in honor of his arrival..
The day has been clear. mild. and very pleasant.

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 130

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

Monday November 20th 1865

Today’s march has been without anything
exciting [illegible in original].. day very pleasant. and nearly all
the officers and mounted men chasing wolves. and
rabbits. Maj. Warner’s dog. Nellie ran one down yes
terday. and this morning Billy. Brown chased one
nearly on quite three miles; while some of the others joined
him after a time and after tiring him almost out. Swartz
killed him with his revolver.. About ten o’clock
we spied a single solitary antelope. near the road
who seemed to care very little for us. Sergt. Hanson
of Co “E” shot a wild goose or [illegible in original] on the bank
of the river this morning..
We are camped 5½ miles above Plum Creek
having marched 30 miles..


Tuesday November 21st 1865

Today has been clear, cold and windy and we
have found overcoats very comfortable all day.
We are camped to.night at Townsley’s ranche ten
miles above Fort Kearney.
Nothing interesting or exciting occurred during
the day. Several of the “Pilgrim’s” who have been
travelling with us. left us tonight and have gone
on to Fort Kearney. intending to take the route to
Omaha. at the Fort and the chances of danger
from Indians being nearly or over they can
now travel alone in safety.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 131

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

Wednesday November 23d 1865

We reached Fort Kearney soon after noon
and have some prospect now of leaving the service
here. On arriving here Maj Warner went to the Fort
to report and found Lieut. Wheaton here who told him
that if it was the choice of the men he would mus
ter us out here immediately. Of course the majority
chose to do so. and on reporting the fact to the Gen
he informed him that he would immediately
telegraph to Gen Dodge for authority to muster
us out and we shall perhaps receive an answer
tomorrow morning.
The train halted an hour or two at Kearney
City or Adobe Town and I found it considerable
larger than I thought it was last summer. It con
tains quite a decent sized “Hotel” three or four good
stores. two or three saloons. an Apothecary Shop. three
Blacksmiths shops a wagon shop and quite a large
number of dwelling houses..
No changes are noticeable at Ft Kearney
it contains about the same number of buildings
as it did last summer.. I stepped into the
sutler’s store when I first arrived here and
about the first face I set my eyes on was that
of Rozelle. whom it seems has worked his
way by some means to this point. Did not speak
with him but have understood that he is on his
way “East” perhaps going to assist his father in
raising vegetables..

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 132

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

Thursday November 23d 1865

Have remained in camp at Ft Kearney all day
awaiting a reply from Gen. Dodge which has failed
to come.. The men begin to think they have commen
ced a losing game. as the prospects do not seem so
flattering now as they did yesterday. and the prospect
of losing several days of good weather such as we are
now having does not give very good satisfaction..
This morning Maj Warner and Charley Pratt. went
hunting. and succeeded in bringing in a couple of
Prarie Chickens.. Capt Ballard started on this morning
choosing to run the risk of remaining in the service
a few days longer rather than lose the fine weather..
The trains are camped about four miles below
here and are getting somewhat impatient and some
of them say they will not wait longer than until
Saturday morning and some want to start at
noon tomorrow. A large train of mule teams
passed down the road this morning.


Friday November 24th 1865

Receive no reply from Gen. Dodge yet. Gen
Wheaton started for Omaha yesterday morning
and his mustering officer followed him this
morning saying that he would come back if Gen.
Dodge's reply should prove favorable. Day some
cooler than yesterday but yet clear and pleasant
Have not been out of camp today.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 133

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

Saturday November 25th 1865

This morning no farther news had been
received from Gen. Dodge and Gen. Wheaton and
Maj Warner having become impatient concluded
to resume the march and accordingly at 2:30
P.M. we started on again. and marched 9 miles
camping at "Dog.town" or Valley City.. Tis strange
that I should forget such a place as this yet I
can not remember anything of it on our outward
bound journey last summer.. It contains a
hotel. three stores. two ranches and two or three
dwelling houses
Gen. Heath com'd'g at Fort Kearney told
Maj Warner that if any of the men choose to
remain there they would be discharged as soon
as the Mustering Officer returned and several
choosing to remain their Description Lists were
furnished them and we bade them "good bye"
Among them were Sergt Cameron of Co. "C" and
two privates. Sergts Wellman and McMurphy. Cox
Huxley. Blacksmith Bartholomew. and four others
of Co "G." While we were tearing up camp
one squadron of the 2nd U.S. Cav. arrived at
Fort Kearney and will releive the Cavalry now
stationed there. They formerly belonged to the
Reserve Brigade of our old division and partici
pated in all the principal actions. marches and
raids of our old corps..
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 134

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

Sunday November 26th 1865

We started from "Dog. town" at an early hour and
all were feeling in excellent spirits at the prospect of
having good weather as the morning was clear and
pleasant and the roads usually good. Four miles
below "Dog town" we left the valley of the Platte and
struck out for the region of the Little Blue.. At
noon we stopped at "Big Muddy" station where
a little water was found and the teams watered..
We met several trains of freighters and one fine drove of
young and beef cattle on their way to Cottonwood
Springs.. also met the western bound coach soon
after leaving the Platte.
Tonight we are camped in the vicinity of
Elm Creek. station. This is the same station near
which we encamped on the 6th of July. and which
I there supposed to be Buffalo Ranche.. Our distance
marched today was 30 miles. We find plenty of
wood and water and Dan has managed to get
some beef. for which they only pay the 1½ Cts per pound..
The man keeping this ranche was from Ionia County
Michigan. and seems to be a very. Kind. sociable man
and one who would make friends in any place..
Detachments of the 12th Mo. Cav. are stationed along
this part of the road and are anxiously inquiring
if any troops are coming from above to releive them..
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 135

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

Monday November 27th 1865

Tonight we reached "Little Blue" station after
a march of 34 miles and find ourselves camped in
a nice little bottom surrounded by bluffs. and with
plenty of good dry timber for fuel. and although the
night is cold we can Keep comfortable over a large
fire of dry oak.. the day has been cold and cloudy
with a strong wind blowing almost directly in our
faces.. During the forenoon we stopped at Pawnee
Ranche where we were told that yesterday a stock
tender while out in "Squaw Hollow" about two miles
from the ranche. found the body of a white man who
had been Killed and scalped. apparently but a few days
before. supposed to have been done by some Indians who
were seen prowling around here on Friday or
Saturday last..
On leaving camp this morning Majs Sproule
and Warner.. and Charley Pratt. took their dog and
guns and struck out along the bank of the Little
Blue to look for game. and arrived in camp
a while after the rest of us. bringing some prarie
chickens and rabbitts.. They reported having seen
two or three Indians near Pawnee Ranche this
forenoon. they also say that they saw lots of a larger
number of beaver dam's along the river and signs
that beaver were quite plenty in some of them..
The praries have been on fire on all sides of us today
burning very slowly. and are very far from filling
the glowing and extravagant descriptions of novel writers.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 136

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

Tuesday November 28th 1865

Today has been cool but clear and pleasant.
and our march of 28 miles has been very comfortable.
We are camped at Thompson's station tonight 7 miles
from the "Little Blue" and 13 miles from Big Sandy.
We left the Little Blue at the stations where we spent
the Fourth of July. "Thompson's" is simply a stage
station where he keeps hay and grain for sale but
Keeps no store. He has a small field under cultivation
where he has raised some corn this past summer..
the only cultivated upland I have seen anywhere along
this route.. We passed quite a large farm on the bank
of the Little Blue this forenoon. enclosed with a good
substantial rail fence. and containing a large field
of cornstalks from which the corn had been gathered
but which looked as though quite a crop had been
gathered from it.. At Kioway station there was
another large field of corn and they told us that
their corn had been very good this season..
There is no water at this station excepting such
as can be got from a well 110 feet deep. therefore
our animals have to go without water to.night
The Eastward bound coach passed us about half
past seven this evening and among its passengers
had Capt Clark and Capt Cochrane. who made
a short visit to the camp. while they were changing
horses. Capt Cochrane is on his way to St Louis
to assume the duties of his new position. Capt
Clark's wound heals very rapidly but is yet quite
weak and he is unable to walk without crutches..
Durling, who has been drinking hard for a day or
two is troubled with a rush of blood to his head produc-
ing what Dr. Shafer calls "Blind Staggers." "Alf" thinks
he is going to die but Shafer says he is in no danger
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 137

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

Wednesday November 29th 1865

This morning as soon as we could get under weigh
we started from Thompson's and about 9.30 reached
big Sandy where we watered the teams and horses
Big Sandy has grown some since our visit last
summer. and seems to be quite a thriving little place
We crossed the creek at a different bridge from that
on which we crossed last summer and took a new
road to the Little Sandy which we reached at
about noon where we stopped to feed our horses
The train followed the old road and we met
them about three miles from the creek.
We pushed on to Rock Creek where we were to halt
for the night and waited for the train to come
up. We are now near the boundary line of Kansas
and tomorrow I presume we shall enter a state once
more. The praries have been burning very
rapidly all day and the people here were compelled
to turn out and set fire near the ranche to protect
it from the prairies. The day has been cold. cloudy
and windy. and the night is very unpleasant.. We are
encamped below the ranche in a small grove of oaks
with good timber and water handy. Dan bought
grain and hay for the command tonight for which
he gives 1½ Cts per pound for hay and $1.50 per bushel
for corn. Bought good fresh pork for 25 cts per lb. to
night
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 138

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

Thursday November 30th 1865

Last night was the most exciting and sleepless
night we have spent since leaving Denver..
The praries were burning all around us and came down
to the brow of the hill near the edge of timber sur
rounding our encampment and all were very much
afraid that it would catch in the grass among
the timber in which case everything would have
been destroyed. Several times during the night Crocker
Carpenter or myself awoke and looked out to see
what progress the fire was making and once, along
towards morning Crocker awoke suddenly and seeing
the moon shining brightly through the torn corner
of the tent sprang nearly from the tent. awakening
both Carpenter and myself. who followed him nearly
from the tent before we ascertained what it was.
This morning we left Rock Creek at daylight
and taking the "cut off" left Marysville to the right
and marching 28 miles camped at Oteeka on the
Big Blue. at 3 P M. We are once more in Kansas
and everything begins to assume an air of civilization
We have passed through much good country today. and
in this immediate vicinity there is as beautiful
country as one wishes to see. We have plenty of
good timber for fires tonight and the old prarie
grass looks very luxuriant.. We get potatoes for [illegible in original]
per bushel. beefsteak 15 cts per pound butter 40 ¢ per pound
and everything else in proportion. Hay and grain
much cheaper than we have seen it before.
The day has been clear, cold and very windy. and
whenever we came within sight of a hollow or belt
of timber it was a race to see which should be the
first under [illegible in original]..
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 139

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

Friday December 1 1865

We have marched 28 miles today and are
encamped at Wild [illegible in original] or rather on the banks of
a little stream but what gives it the name of Wild
[illegible in original] or whether this be intended as a name for the
creek or the two houses half a mile a part is
more than I can judge. The country is becoming
more thickly settled each day and we see much
beautiful country The praries continue on fire yet and
when the fire has passed we see nothing but one
vast waste of a black land. We passed a stage
station to.day called [Frog?] Station and a small village
called "Ash Point" the whole of which is owned by
an eccentric old Irishman. who by a large sign
proclaims himself to the world as "Uncle John."
He keeps a small store in which is found a general
assortment of everything a tavern known as the Union
Hotel.. while a considerable collection of other buildings
is situated all around him. We halted there about
noon to wait for the train to come up and while.
waiting a portion of the 18th U.S. infantry with
a large train passed them on their way to Fort
Kearney. Some of our boys. saw "Knobbly" who deserted
from Co "K" last summer driving one of the teams.
in that train.. We also met several other trains loaded
with freight for Denver and supplies for various
military posts.. The day has been cool. cloudy and
very windy.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 140

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

Saturday December 2nd 1865

To night we are encamped on the bank of Walnut
creek near the "Two mile House" having marched 28
miles to.day. Passed through Seneca and Grenada
to.day two very flourishing towns.. Seneca is the county
seat Nemaha County and is really a beautiful
town of four or five hundred. inhabitants. It contains
a beautiful hotel several stores. and other shops all of
which are new buildings and nearly all of them
fitted up in good style. The country in its immediate
vicinity is very good and all were well pleased with
the place.. after leaving Seneca we to a few of us took
a road leading across the prarie and which some
citizens told us intersected the stage road again
near Grenada. and was much shorter.. The
praries were on fire all around us and once we were
compelled to ride through a strip of fire which amid
the tall grass arose nearly to our heads. Two or three
of the horses got singed, some but not seriously..
There has been almost no wind today and the
fires have not burned very rapidly Had the wind
blown as strongly today as it has several days
during this march it would have been dangerous
to venture among the rich tall grass that abounds
here. and we might have been treated to a view of
that grand spectacle so often described in glowing
terms by novel writers. "a prarie on fire."
We find lots of walnuts. hickory nuts. and some butter
nuts tonight as there are large numbers of these trees
near the bank of the creek. and from this fact the
creek derives it's name. We are 36 miles from Atchison
to night and Maj Warner has given me permission
to go there to.morrow.
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 141

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

Tuesday December 5th 1865

Our march is ended and we are now about to
commence in earnest our preparations for going
home. We are now in camp at Fort Leavenworth: the
men in barracks and the officers in their tents with
a prospect of having rooms furnished them tomorrow.
The command reached here soon after noon but I
did not until about five o'clock.
Sunday morning I saddled my horse long
before daylight and started. determined to ride into
Atchison before night. to pay Newton Stephens a
visit. The day proved rainy. and cold. and I was
almost sorry I started.. At noon I stopped at
the Lancaster House for dinner. and found I
was within ten miles of Atchison. I arrived at
Atchison about 3:30 P.M. and after a good deal
of inquiry found Newt.. I remained there yesterday
and last night. and started from there about 10. A.M. today
Found Atchison to be quite a town. although not very
beautifully situated. I think. It is completely surrounded
on three sides. by high bluffs and on the fourth by the
Missouri river. the Atchison and Pikes Peak R.R. starts
from here and a few miles of the track are now laid.
It is also the eastern terminus of Ben Holladays Overhaul
Stage Line. and Butterfield's Overland Despatch and many
think it will soon rival Leavenworth City in size and
business facilities. Yesterday was cold and unpleasant.
This morning it was fair but grew cooler towards
night and we now have indications of snow.. Found
[illegible in original] other detachments of our regiment here. also the 16th
[illegible in original] Cav. and 3d "Galvanized" or U.S. Vol. Inf. there mustered
out and waiting final payment. A portion of a regt
[illegible in original] Cav. is also here awaiting muster out. We are
[illegible in original] mustered out. here but will go to Jackson for
final payments..
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 142

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

Wednesday Dec. 6th 1865

After supper last night. Carpenter. Gregg
and myself went down to the city. Carpenter
and I with a view of selling our ponies and
not being able to do so remained all night
putting up at the Mansion House which is
certainly the poorest kept house I ever saw.
This morning I returned. riding charley
Pratts horse and leaving mine with Hank
and Alec [Saird?] to dispose of. It was snow
ing a wet, heavy snow this morning but finally
grew colder towards night and continued snow
ing all day. until dark when the ground was
quite white. I set myself to work last night
this morning to obtain a room for. Hank and
myself and finally succeeded and this
afternoon got to work. Hank and Alec returned
this afternoon having sold the three horses.
They brought me a small gold watch and
ten dollars for my pony. while the others did
similarly.. At the Planter's House last night
I met Col. Darling. Capt.s Sergeant. Fisher. Clark
Loomis. and Ballard.. and others. Capt Clarks wound
is healing slowly and he was able to come up
and see me today. The "1st" were mustered
out and paid off a day or two ago and will
leave before long.. Capt. Pearsons and Lieut
Henry. let a team run away with them a
few days ago.. injuring Henry badly.
The greatest joke was that Henry was sober;
the first time he had been so in a long time..
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 143

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865


Illness Fatal to Aged War Veteran

TAPS WILL SOUND TODAY
FOR CIVIL WAR VETERAN

Death of Mrs. E.R. Havens

Long State Service
Is Ended by Death

PAST COMMANDER
OF G.A.R. IS DEAD
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 144

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865


Rites at Lansing
For E.R. Havens, 89

Pioneer Berrien County Man Dies In
Lansing

ATTENDING FUNERAL

No title – article begins "Edwin R. Havens, head of the Conservation …"

EDWIN R. HAVENS

No title – article begins "A striking instance of "bringing forth … "
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 145

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

LANSING WOMAN DIES SUDDENLY

OFFICIALS TO ATTEND
FUNERAL OF VETERAN

Retires After 42 Years' Service
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 146

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

In Memoriam

E.L. Havens, 80, Only
One Knowing Land Laws
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 147

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

"HE RODE WITH CUSTER!"

(Dedicated to Lieut. Edwin R. Havens)
The Marshal of the Day. 1925
May 30 –



He rides ahead the column
An Age'd man with spirit unsubdued,
And in the line are marching
Broken Men in blue, who seem
From out some old and hallowed
page of History.

"He rode with Custer",
The voice that speaks is thin and quavery,
As tho pride and tears were
intermingled back of it.
I turn and at my side,
Supported by his stalwart grandson,
An infirm veteran stands.

"Ed Havens rode with Custer", he repeated,
And I thought would follow a tale of battle,
And fierce charges with musketry's
rattle and cannon's boom—
But all the burthen of his talk was,
"He rode with Custer".
And then, blind tho I am and dull of mind,
I seemed to understand
That this the acme of all glory was—
To have been of those who rode with Custer.

The column passes and I turn away,
To view a trailing cloud athwart the sun,-
And even as I looked, a column formed,
And in the van a Chief with long and yellow hair,
And riding with him men in blue,
No longer old but young and eager.
Then to mineself I said, "In the
columns of our ancient God,
"They ride with Custer!"


The author worked in the office with
Dad- (E.H.)
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 148

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865

W W Allen

Amts Brot Forward 553.50 559.41
Dec 7 By 1 " Coffee .30
1¼ " butter .29 .59
9 " 1 Sp Thread .08 10 " 1½ [yd?] Points .19
11 " 1 Mug .20
" Medicine .35
" 3 yd Flannel 1.80 2.35
13 " 1 Box Baking Powder .20
" 2 cigars .20
" 1 Scarf 1.25 1.65
14 " ½ " Tea .63
" 2 cigars .20
" cash .75 1.58
16 " Cigars .30
" Coffee .30
" Butter .52 1.12
17 " Flour 1.06
" Cigars .20 1.26
18 " Cigars .20
" Prescription .25
" Cash for Harpers 3.50 3.95
19 " Cash .25
21 " Cash 3.00
" Chicken .28 3.28
23 " 4# Sugar .50
" Cash 1.25 1.75
24 " 1 Cigar .10
27 " ½ Oil .18
" 1 Cigar .10 .28
28 " 1# Coffee .30
" 1 Box Baking Powder .20
" Pd Bowe. Sundries for wood 2.50 3.00
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 149

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 150

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 151

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865, Page: 152

Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Edwin R. Havens Diary June 24, 1865 through December 12, 1865
Contact us with Questions or Comments