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Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

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Creator: Edwin R. Havens
Subjects: Civil War, 1861-1865
Date: 1860-1869
Format: Image/jpg
Original Format: Document
Collection Number: LC00016 – Havens Family Papers, Box 2, Volume 3
Language: English
Rights Management: Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by Michigan State University and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the University Archives & Historical Collections, Michigan State University.
Contributing Institution: Michigan State University Archives & Historical Collections
Relation: LC00016 – Havens Family Papers, Box 2, Volume 3
Contributor: MSU Archives and Historical Collections
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 1

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

[Penciled in on top of Scan 1 [1863] ]

Near. Boonesboro. [Maryland?]
Tuesday July 6th

I had thought I would not
attempt to keep another diary but
of late we have passed through [illegible in original]
and interesting scenes and a [illegible in original]
shall be more satisfactory for [illegible in original]
reference than none and a [desire?]
to have something to show has again
induced me to again bring [illegible in original]
into use..
On Sunday June 21st
we left Fairfax C.H. in [illegible in original]
with the whole division. we had
been ordered in from camp [illegible in original]
Chantilly on Friday the 19th and
had been under marching
orders during the intervening
time. It was about 10. AM when
we took up our march and for
two hours. the war of cannons
had been coming to our camp
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 2

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

from towards Aldie and Ashby’s
Gap. But as we passed off towards
Centerville the reports seemed to
advance full as rapidly as we did
and as fast and as far as we went
we could find no one that knew
where the fighting was..
We passed Gainesville and
put up at Buckland a small
village, having marched about 20
miles. Our train did not come
up and we had nothing to feed
our horses then and next. morning
when our regt advanced to New
Baltimore about five miles. where
we remained during the day picket
ing and scouting the country..
At dusk we again took up our
march and went as far as Warren
ton and remained over night
when at daylight Cos ‘A” & E were
sent to Beaeleton and from there
in company with detachments
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 3

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

of the 5th & 6th Mich regts marched back
to Gainesville by way of Germantown and
Greenwich.. where we found that orders
had been received to march to Fairfax C.H.
and that the 2nd & 3d brigades had
already done so. We could get no grain
that night and although then about
10 Oclock our horses were taken out
and grazed about an hour. and we
were called up again at two next
morning when our horses got a quart
of corn each.. We arrived at Fairfax
C.H. at 10. A.M. and were again
on the march at 4 P.M. having
got three days rations and two
days forage.. We marched till near
ly two Oclock stopping near Draines
ville.. We were on the march again
next morning early and reached
the Potomac at Edwards Ferry
about noon. where we encountered
the train of the 11th Corps. and our
battery passed over wh the pontoon
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 4

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

bridge. while we who thought we
were to cross at the same place
waited two or three hours when
we found that we could not cross
there and mounting again struck
out for Conrads ford where the
remainder of the division had
crossed.. The ford was passed
with out any accident and we
were then obliged to march
back between the river and canal
to the little village. when we fol
lowed our division which we fou d
a short distance from the river
where we halted long enough to
make a hasty dinner for ourselves
and horses: The infantry had
crossed and were also on the
march and we marched in their
company a mile or two when we
took different roads yet leading
in nearly the same direction
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 5

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

The army seemed to be moving in
four columns, ours being one of the
center ones. We passed through
Poolesville. and Barnesville a small
village of a not very prepossessing
appearance. and all the inhabitants
seemed to lean somewhat towards
“Secesh.” The most of the citizens
we met after crossing the river seemed
to be Union and a great change
had taken place in the appearance
of the country through which we were
and had been travelling.. Instead
of deserted houses. bare and desolate
fields and few inhabitants we now
found beautiful fields of grain of all
kinds nice houses smiling citizens
and everything seemed more like
civilization than anything we had
seen for months.. It had commen
ced to rain about noon and kept
up a slight sprinkling shower
during the afternoon..
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 6

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

We were heading toward
the city of Frederick and at
one time, just at night were
told that we were within seven
miles of that place.. but about
dark a part of our column
missed the road and we were
delayed at different points till
midnight where we stopped in
column in the road and were
night
told to pass the [illegible in original].. The rain
was coming steadily down, the
mud then an inch or two
deep. and all dark as ere [illegible in original]
and no choice of ground could
be made.. In pity for my horse
I had left behind my camp
blanket and had nothing
but my poncho and rubber coat
so. Allen Park and I led our
horses a little to one side of
the road and wrapping up
well as we could lay down

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 7

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

and soon forgot our misery in
sleep.. I slept quite soundly ‘till
daylight when I was able to see
our position.. We were about half
way up a small hill through
which the road had been dug
and the soil being of a clay
we could carry quite a respectable
amount on our boots. and blankets
and clothes were all covered with
the same substance.. Yet every
one seemed in good humor..
and all were laughing at the ap
pearance some. one else presented..
Nearly all had fared alike in
convenience of sleeping apartments
from Col to lowest private..
We remained there until nearly
nine A.M. and in the meantime
solaced ourselves on coffee. pork and
“hard tack” A short distance
from where we camped we
passed through the small
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 8

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

village of Urbana which
contained one or two very nice,
large, dwelling houses. but no
other buildings of any note un
less we except the small village
school house, which we have
found in every village this side
of the Potomac. and which brings
to mind the many happy days
of the past that I have spent
in such an edifice, and regrets
that they could not have been
many more, and better improved..
A little while before noon we passed
through Frederick which we
found to be a much larger
place than I expected and were
much pleased with the reception
we received from the citizens
The good old flag was waving
from many windows along
the principal streets and doors
windows and sidwalks were
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 9

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

crowded with men. women and
children waving hats and hand
kercheifs, and, cheering lustily
for the Union and “Uncle Abe.”
We passed on without halting and
in an hour two reached Middle
town a mile from the foot of
South mountain, where we again
met the advance of the 11th corps.
We passed on and entered the
South Pass and found that a few
scattering rebs were ad retreating
from us.. Our company was sent
on as advance guard and kept on
some distance ahead.. We passed
on up to the top of the mountain
on the battle field of Sept. 14 /62
when the Col coming up we were or
dered ahead to gain information from
the inhabitants We advanced about
three miles and up to within
little more than a mile of Cadysville
when we turned back..
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 10

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

We were led by a Maryland
soldier who was acting as a scout
and on turning back two men
with whom he had been talk
ing called him aside and told
him that an ambush of quite a
body of rebels was laid in a field
of wheat a short distance ahead..
We found the regt encamped
at the top of the mountain on
the field where the battle of
South Mountain was fought..
and we set our tent against
the self same stone wall over
which our gallant 17th charged
a rebel brigade. and won for
themselves and our native state
the glorious name and imperish
able honor they now bear. Marks
of the intense fighting of that day
could be found everywhere.
Not a rail a twig or tree but
what bore the scars and marks
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 11

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

of rifle balls. A small log
house in the midst of the clearing
contained an immense number
of balls in its gable ends..
A well which was partly dug
was said to contain the bodies
of 58. rebels and another grave
near the wall contained a like
number killed by our sharp
shooters as they rose above the
walls to shoot our men
Near the center of the field
a small square stone some two
feet high marked the spot where
Genl. Reno fell.. Our dead were
buried on the eastern slope
of the mountain farther down..
I had no opportunity to visit
their graves.. much as I wished
to We remained there during
the day and at 4 P.M. I
was ordered to take the remain
der of the company and
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 12

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

releive Segt Holton from
picket duty.. Next morning at
two Oclock I heard first
revellie and soon afterwards
boots and saddles from Barneys
bugle.. and in a short time
orders began to come and the
dismounted carbiniers of
other companies were called
in. About 4 O.clock E.D Cooke
came down with some grain
which we dealt out among the
men and soon Holton came
and ordered us in.. We started
as soon as our videttes could be
brought in.. and joined the co.
a short distance from camp
where I halted to procure some
bread. and was much surprised
to have the old farmer inquire
if I knew any one in Mich
named Jacob [Geltmachen?]
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 13

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

and who seemed much pleased
when I told him what I could
concerning him.. We marched
back to Frederick and took
the pike leading from there to
wards Gettisburg Pa. and stopped
near a toll gate about 4 miles from
Frederick where we found our
division, train, and all except the
5th & 6th Mich. regts..
In the valley around Middle
town was large camps of [illegible in original]
and between there and Frederick
we passed a train more than
five miles long..
In the afternoon a grand
division review was held and
the command turned over
to Genl Pleasanton. Genl
Stahel being placed in com
mand of the 11th Corp
and taking Genl. Copeland
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 14

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

with him.. Genl. Kilpatrick
was placed in command of
the division and our brigade
having the 1st Mich added to it
was given to Genl Custerd for
merly chief of Pleasantons staff
At day light next morning
the advance of the 11th corp again
came up and at ten Oclock
we saddled up and started after
them.. It had rained all the
morning and kept it up till
after we passed [Cragentown?]
where we also passed the
advance of the infantry..
The country was not quite
so good as in the immediate
vicinity of Frederick where
I saw I beleive the largest
wheat I ever saw and the
citizens called it a light
[one?] at that
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 15

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

We passed Emmetsburg about
4 A.M. and began to look for
the Pennsylvania line
Emmetsburg was quite a pretty
village but a week before an
accidental fire had destroyed
several fine buildings and
occasioned a loss of nearly
$100.000
[illegible in original] dollars worth of
property. Near the town is
a large Catholic institution
called the Sisterhood of
St Josep institute..
We halted a short dis
tance from there to let
our horses graze and
again started
on towards
Littlestown at
which place we
reached about 10 at night

[Written on the left-hand side of Scan 15]

While I was writing these blotted pages I was sitting in a fence
corner. with my “hole’y” shelter tent laid over two or three rails with the
rain coming down right smart which fact accounts for the blots

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 16

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

Next morning we were off
at daylight and passing
through Hanover where the
citizens brought out everything
we could have asked for
from the choicest delicious
bread and butter to the
most elegant cake and pies
and drinks from pure cold
water to the choicest wines
and brandies.. we marched
on to within sight of Abbotstown
when a caisson of the 2nd
U.S. Art. Batt. M. filled with
cap shells blew up. killing
two horses. blowing one mans
leg off from which he died
next day and tearing a corn
house near by to pieces badly.
Immediately afterwards
we heard cannonading in our
rear and after the head of
the column had reached
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 17

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

the village we turned back
and marched at a quick trot
to Hanover. where we found that
some rebels had attacked our
rear and were then posted in
the woods on the left of the town:
Our regts were sent to the front
and cos A & F were sent forward
as skirmishers mounted. We
advanced mounted nearly
half a mile when we came
in sight of the dismounted
skirmishers of the enemy and
our carbiniers were dismoun
ted and sent forward while
the rest with the horses fell
back under cover. Our boys
held their position nearly
an hour until their ammu
nition gave out and our left
was being flanked by a superior
force of the rebs and they began..
to gradually fall back and
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 18

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863


just then, too, came the order
to retire which we did in good
order. and without loss.
A. corp of Co F named Livings
ton was wound in the hip
at the commencement of
the skirmish and was the
only man struck on our
side.. When we fell back quite
a body of rebs advanced > some
ways up into town where they
were charged by one of our regts
and 37 captured with one
stand of colors.. The artillery
kept up occasionaly firing and
other regiments were skirmish
ing mounted and dis mounted
until about 5 Oclock when the
enemy retired.. I have seen no
papers and I have seen no
official reports of the loss on
either side and only know
that the victory was won
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 19

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

without knowing its cost or
profit.. After remaining in
battle array till night we pitched
camp and remained during
the forenoon of the next day
procuring rations and forage
and preparing rolls for our
bi monthly muster..
Beers. Allen and Edwards
were in the rear of the column
with the led horses and were
among the first attacked.
Edwards came through all
right.. while Allen has been
missing ever since and no tidings
have been received from him..
Beers was cut off. his horse
killed and he captured
another which he lost than
escaped and hid in a barn
and laid until next morning
and rejoined us just as we
were ready to leave camp.
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 20

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

Horsh was also missing his
horse having given out and for
a long time we feared he
was a prisoner. Howe, and Nye
were also in the rear. Nye had
his horse shot but got another
rebel [rig?] horse, saddle blan
kets and every thing.
At two Oclock we again
took up our march and
went as far as East Berlin
24 miles from Harrisburgh
where we could see traces of
a large body of rebs that had
passed through there the day
before numbering about 8,000
Something caused the brig
ade to be drawn in line of
ed
battle in which way we remain^
until dusk.. While in line
Col Mann mustered our regt
and Wm Graham was pro
moted to a Sergt
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 21

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

At dark we went into
camp and made ourselves
comfortable as we could.
Next morning Barber
and Springer strayed off
and have not been heard
from since.. They undoubtedly
intended to desert..
While waiting in line of battle
the night before we heard heavy
cannonading to our left rear
which we conjectured must be
at Gettisburg.. Next morning
we started back again and at
10. O’clock halted at Abbottstown
where we remained an hour
or two and then took the [Settle? Little?]
York pike leading towards
Gettisburg. We passed through
New Oxford where we heard that
a party of rebels had captured
our advance scouts half an
hour before..
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 22

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

We moved on and soon
heard the war of cannon
around Gettisburg and heard
that quite a hard battle was
fought there the day before
and that they had been
fighting nearly all that day
We halted for a time in light
of the smoke of the battle and
were then sent off to the right.
Pitts Walling stopped to get
a shoe set on his horse and
has failed to overtake us
yet.. We reached Hunterstown
just at dusk and our d advance
drove in a rebel picket killing
and wounding 8 or 10 of them.
An artillery duel of about one
then
hour, ^ occurred between three
of our pieces and one or two
of the rebels in which the reb
was silenced Both batteries
did excellent showing the

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 23

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

shot and shells from the
rebs flying very close to
our pieces. Our co. and F
supported the battery while
the rest of the regt deployed
as skirmishers dismounted..
The cannonading and mus
ketry toward the main field
was quite heavy till about 9 Oc.k
At that time it had almost
entirely ceased and we fell
back half a mile where we
remained in line one man
in each section holding the
four horses while the other
three slept about midnight
we left there and passing around
to the right front reached a reserve
at daylight where we remained
until about nine Oclock when
we were sent to protect the
extreme right which a force
of cavalry and artillery
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 24

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

was threatening.. Our artil
lery exchanged shots with
theirs until about four Oclock
and the cavalry maneuvered
about. our regt being always
at the front supporting the
battery.. At about four P.M.
our regt was ordered forward
and we charged upon a
large force of dismounted
skirmishers protected by
a strong fence and hedge
of bushes.. All went well
until within range of their
guns and right upon their
lines we had to charge through
a gap where but four or five
could pass at a time and
where they proved a very
destructive fire upon us..
When we got through that
we found ourselves between
a fire on each flank
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 25

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

while their cavalry came
down in front.. We broke,
Who could have done otherwise.
I saw but few fall about
me yet the balls sung a lively
tune and one horse just ahead
of me fell heels over head
and just then a ball struck
the forefinger of my right
hand at the knuckle just
breaking the skin. but at
the start it occasioned causing
me to drop my sabre. My horse
too got out from under me
and I found myself in a
ditch. There commenced a
confusion almost a panic
but after retreating out of
range by the exertions of the
officers the men were rallied
and again charged the
rebel cavalry which broke
and retreated behind their
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 26

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

dismounted riflemen..
Our men on receiving their
fire again retreated and
again rallied and the gal
lant old “1st” coming up at
a charge we prepared to
support them, But they
ed
did not need any they charg^
through the rebels when
receiving a charge on the
flank broke and rallied
and were soon masters of
the field.. Then came the
looking up of comrades. I had
seen but a few of our company
since passing the Gap that had
proven so fatal to us.. I had
seen Chester Calvin who was
badly wounded in the thigh
and sent him to the rear.
Poor Walters was lying just
in range of their balls shot
ly
through the head and apparent^
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 27

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

just breathing his last. his horse
standing quietly by his side until
lead led away.. I assisted to carry
him back out of danger of being run
over.. I met E.D. Cooke whose horse
had been shot through both hind
legs, and was told by him that the
Capt was badly wounded. Crocker
and OBrien also came up and
Holton soon after.. At sundown
we rallied at our old position
from whence we started on the
charge and found ten men and
our Lieut and could account
for three more whom we knew
were unhurt.. This was discourag
ing.. We started on that charge
with 36 men and here was
what was left.. Of the missing
we could account for only a few
Those few were Walters, Killed;
Calvin wounded. Hollis wounded
Caines wounded. Reames wounded
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 28

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

Of those that could not be
accounted for, were Brownell.
Brickell who was known to be
wounded; Chappell wounded or
Killed: Worthen thought to have
been Killed; Dumphrey who when
last seen was dismounted but
unhurt. Nye who was seen to
fall. Wilcox whom no one had seen;
[Hienck?] not seen. Fisher since
known to be wounded but safe.
and our Capt Perrine was
taken prisoner disarmed and
struck once with a sabre but
managed to escape and
was eager to go forward again
Wm Graham had his horse shot
under him. cooly saved his
carbine which was attached
to his saddle and commenced
taking off his blankets when
the rebs came too close upon
him and he “skedaddled”
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 29

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

Crockers horse was shot down
Dumphrey’s was beleived to have
been shot and many other in
stances which I can not now
remember.. In other cos the
loss was also quite heavy
In Co F. Lieut Carpenter
was shot in the breast and
for a long time thought to
be Killed but was brought
from the field by an ambulance
and was still alive next mor
ning.. Sergt Minor was Killed.
Corp [Homer?] wounded and 10
or twelve others missing. At the
rally they had but one corp
C.. P. White.. 2 Sergts and 12 men
only wounded
In. Co D. Sergts Dunnett ^ and
Milburn were Killed. and Sergt
Shotwell wounded. Their loss
in men was considerable
also. In Co “C” Sergt Griffith
was wounded in the head and
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 30

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

Sergt Church who carried the
regimental colors Killed. Sergt
Rose wounded and Sergt
Kelehers wounded in the hand
by a sabre.. Capt. [Darling?] was injured
by the fall of his horse. which was
shot.. Capt Moore of Co K was
taken prisoner and disarmed
but escaped.. I should have
stated that Lieut Birney
while attempting to bring off
the regimental colors was
surrounded and taken prisoner
The losses in other Cos I am
not much posted in as they
were in other battalions..
Col. Mann had his right
stirrup shot off without injuring
either himself or horse and
the buckle of his belt was
also struck and indented
by a ball.. Lieut Col Litchfield
had his horse shot under

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 31

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

him.. and Major Newcombe was
wounded / in the calf of the left
leg.. Soo
Soon after our fighting
had ceased the fighting along
the whole line had also ceased..
and it was reported that the
enemy had begun to fall back..
extreme
The firing on our ^ left had not
been very brisk.. the heaviest seem
ing to be from the center near
the city towards our right..
At 10 A.M. the cannonading
along the whole line was light
only an occasional gun booming
forth its notes of death.. This
continued for nearly two hours
and we began to hope the battle
was over. But it was only a lull
in the storm which at 1 o’clock
d
broke forth again with increase^
and terrible energy.
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 32

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

From that time until 5
O.clock the roar of cannon was constant
and we could scarcely discern the
report of one cannon from another.
Neither side seemed to waver
and it seemed as though every
cannon in the field was gathered
in one spot and endeavoring to ex
haust itself as rapidly as possible..
Sergt OBrien’s horse being
shot he accompanied the Capt to
a private house where the Capt
intended to remain.. At dark
we fell back to the field from which
we started in the morning where
we remained until morning
when we moved a short distance
to our wagon train where we fed
our horses and replenished our stock
of ammunition and rations..
Here the officers were called to
gather and received complimentary
thanks from Genl Kilpatrick..
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 33

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

who informed them that he had
received complimentary orders from
Genl Mead saying that our work
on the right had decided the battle
and that to the boldness. and decis
ion of our movements was due the
success of our arms that day..
About noon we again started
forward and marched to Emmetsburg
and from there taking the pike
leading through the mountains on
the right.. About two O’clock it
commenced raining and we had a very
severe storm.. Soon after passing Emmets
burg it became rumored that we
were to attack and burn a wagon
train of the rebs which was passing
just ahead of us.. We moved very
cautiously and about 9 Oclock our
advance received three rounds of grape
and cannister from a rebel gun posted
in the road.. The extreme advance
consisted of two men of Co. ‘M’ 1st
Mich Cavalry.
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 34

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

neither of whom were struck and
who stood their ground until charged
by the rebs.. who immediately fell
back. The 5th & 6th were dismounted
and sent forward as skirmishers
The rebs did not attempt to
make but one more stand and
retreated down the mountain as
rapidly as they dared to..
As fast as was prudent our
forces were pushed forward and
about 11 Oclock the 1st charged down
a narrow and dangerous defile upon
the train which was found to be mostly
ambulance wagons filled with wounded
confederates..
Our regt was marched up to
the point from which the charge
commenced and near where stood
a
a large Hotel. which was m^de by
Genl Kilpatrick his Headquarters..
Here we were formed in a field close
by in solid column of squadrons. and
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 35

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

Cos A. B. & F dismounted and
deployed around the field in the
bushes as skirmishers and pickets
Here we lay until 3 Oclock.
listening to the skirmishing. shelling
and charging going on in the defile
and rally below us.. At that time
we mounted and started on.. In
the defile were strewn disabled wagons
dead and wounded horses and the
journey was a difficult and slow
one.. At daylight we reached the
foot of the mountain and found
nearly a hundred prisoners..
Turning to the left we took
the road towards Smithtown and
passed many wagons. some disabled
some unharmed but all filled
with sick and wounded confeder
ates. and all along the road was
prisoners walking along and
at one barn I noticed some
twenty of them without a guard
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 36

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

near them.. All seemed con
tented and fully as well satisfied
to be a prisoner among Union
soldiers as fighting them among
the rebels.. We reached Smith
town about noon where in
a lane nearby was nearly a
thousand of the gray jackets ap
pearing quite easy in mind and
body.. We halted for an hour
or two and got some grub and fed
our horses. and thought perhaps
we might rest awhile; but at
about 4 O’clock we were ordered
out and took up a position
and soon one of our batteries
was engaged [within?] a rebel
battery.. They exchanged shots
for an hour or two and then
both parties ex changed position and
at dusk we fell back and marched
to near Boonesboro arriving there
about two Oclock A.M.
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 37

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

The next morning we started
again and taking the “Western Pike”
went to Funkstown. where we learned
the
that ^ rebels were at Hagerstown two
miles distant.. and forces were sent
forward and our brigade was kept
for a time protecting the pike near
Funkstown. but afterwards we
were sent away to the right of
the city. when our men were dis
mounted and sent out as skir
mishers.. The rebs were in good
force but fell back under the
fire of our boys. After fighting
between one and two hours our
men were called in and while
we were falling back our battery
engaged theirs briskly.. We fell
back on another pike to the left
of the one on which we had
This pike led to Williamsport
advanced^. After marching
about two miles we heard
cannonading in front of us
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 38

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

and soon came to the conclu
sion that Buford had attacked
their wagon train a part of
which we had seen moving in
this direction. The fighting
from this time till dark
was brisk and heavy when we
fell back some three miles,
staying there until morning
and then marching back to
this place and taking up
a camp. Co “K.” was nearly
all taken together with Capt.
Willet of Co E. and Lieut Gray
of Co. B. “Lieut Gray had been
skirmishing and being very
warm drank very plenty of
water which made him sick
and being charged by the rebs
could not get away..
While at Funkstown Lieut
[Newman?] of Co. G. took one man
from each Co. and left the
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 39

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

column to procure some horses.
While out they were pursued by
a number of rebs. and Sergt Laird
of Co “B” and Corp. White of Co. F.
were taken prisoners.
Wm Graham had just changed
horses. and was scarcely ten rods
from them when they came up.
Had he not done this he would
undoubtedly have been captured
too.. We found our wagon train
here, and have drawn a small
quantity of rations.. It has rained
some and promises a rainy
night..
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 40

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

Bivouac Near Maryland
Boonesboro Md
Thursday July 19th 1863
July 10th

Time flies: and every day brings
something new. eventful and interest
ing in the history of this campaign..
Tuesday night was wet rainy. and
disagreeable and the forenoon of Wed
nesday was also stormy. At about
two Oclock A M. “Boots and Saddles”
sounded and while preparing to
move we could hear an occasional
report of cannon or rifle and knew
that the foe was again near at hand.
About noon we marched
out to the north side of town and
our regt supporting the battery
took up a position on the first
range of hills just out of town..
Here the battery exchanged a
few shots with one of theirs and
then advanced to the next range.
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 41

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

Bivouac Near Maryland
Boonesboro Md
Thursday July 19th 1863
July 10th

Time flies: and every day brings
something new. eventful and interest
ing in the history of this campaign..
Tuesday night was wet rainy. and
disagreeable and the forenoon of Wed
nesday was also stormy. At about
two Oclock A M. “Boots and Saddles”
sounded and while preparing to
move we could hear an occasional
report of cannon or rifle and knew
that the foe was again near at hand.
About noon we marched
out to the north side of town and
our regt supporting the battery
took up a position on the first
range of hills just out of town..
Here the battery exchanged a
few shots with one of theirs and
then advanced to the next range.
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 42

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

One of their batteries was placed
in a position that harassed our
our
skirmishers on their right. and
two pieces of our battery was sent
out with the first battalion
of our regt to support them
We took up a position in a
field of wheat where their battery
had an excellent range which
ate
they did not fail to use but fortun^
for us though their shot and
shell flew in all directions above
and around us not a man or
horse was harmed.. After expend
ing all their ammunition. (they
had only their limbers) we retired
to our first position.. About this
time the fire between the skir
mishers becamse steady and
heavy and for a time I
began to fear that our boys
might be driven back but
their Spencers were too much
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 43

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

for the “Johnny Rebs” and they
fell back.. Then our section of
the battery and our battalion
was moved down the pike far
in advance of where we had
been before and while our battery
was taking up a position the
cavalry was ordered forward
and we went down the pike
¼ of a mile to where Genl Custer
and his staff were stationed
when we were ordered back to
support the battery.. turning
to the right we marched across
the field until a shell from one
of the rebel guns struck in the
ground just ahead of Col. Litch
field and Sergt Holton without
r
bursting.. Another^ bu^st directly
over Col Mann’s head the
force of the concussion blowing
him out of the saddle doing
him no other damage.
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 44

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

Another. more unlucky one,
exploded in the ranks of Co D.
and literally blew Peter Campeau
and his horse all to pieces and
seriously wounding Scott Gibbs..
Soon after this our regt was sent
back to camp and the battle was
over Kilpatrick and Buford held
their ground..
We were expecting them again
yesterday morning. but all was quiet.
Early the infanty commenced
marching by us.. The 1st 6th &
11th Corps came by. and took up
positions or advanced towards
Hagerstown and Williamsport..
We moved our camp last
night and now occoupy a piece
of woods about a mile southwest
of the town. At dusk last night
we heard severe musketry and
an occasional report or artillery to
the South and west of us..

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 45

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

which continued between one
and two hours: and expected that
this morning would open another
great battle.. But all has been
comparatively quiet.. About seven
Oclock cannonading and mus
ketry was heard two or three miles
from us. but it has rapidly retrea
ted and now it sounds ten or fifteen
miles away and rapidly growing
more and more distant..
Last night Major Granger
with two new companies S & M
for our regt arrived.. They number
about 100, and poorly arrived with
nothing but sabres. scarcely any
of any them having either car
bines or revolvers..
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 46

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

Camp Near Warrenton Junction
Sunday August 9th /63

Nearly a month has elapsed
since I finished the foregoing pages
and an attempt at dates would be
folly on my part..
We were not long allowed
to enjoy the camp spoken of in
the last page. but in a day or
two we were moved out on the
extreme right of Meade’s line
which he had lately formed
We remained over night at
one place then moved a mile
or two and remained a day
and night and then moved
on as far as Hagerstown.. The 1st
Mich charged through the place
taking near a hundred prisoners
among whom were 1 Brig. Gen.*
1 Lieut Col and a Major

I think this was Gen Jenkins
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 47

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

As we entered the town and
when we were within sight of the
seminary building a 12 pound
piece of the rebels opened on our
column with shell many of which
struck on either side of the column
only
but ^ one of which did any harm.
This one struck Lieut Hamlin
in the fleshy part of the left arm
taking out the flesh right to the
bone and wounded his horse
before exploding
We found the citizens in
Hagerstown eager to receive us and
glad to be freed from rebel rule..
under which they had lived
for four weeks. We were sent
out to the right of the town on
the road leading towards Gettys
burg.. where we remained until
nearly midnight when we were
releived by the 6th Mich Ar,
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 48

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

We moved to a hill
on the Waynesboro pike where
our camp was established..
It rained during the night
and some next day. The next
day such horses as needed shoe
ing were taken to the city and as
many of them, shod as we had
shoes and nails for.. Sergts Holton
Graham and myself went down to
the city with horses. and while
there E D. Cooke came down with
the pay rolls and orders to have
them made out immediately..
d
Holton and myself accompanie^
him down the streets when we
found a room which the owner
told us had been used by the rebs
for a commissary department..
We went to work got our table
and seats ready and well spread
out when we found that we had
no old roll to copy from nor even
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 49

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

a check roll. Here was a
dilemma. What should we do?
A consultation ensued during
which we ate some very nice blue
plums which grew just outside
our back window.. It was finally
decided that I should return
to the blacksmith shop and
send some of the boys to camp to
find if possible the rolls and bring
them to us.. while the others sallied
out to engage a dinner for three..
We all met again in a short
time and prepared to make oursel
ves as comfortable as possible until the
rolls arrived. Soon Bonnell re
turned bringing the report that the
rolls could not be found so wait
ing what we thought to be a reason
able time we started out to find
our dinner.. It was a good one
but I had eaten so many plums
that I could not do it justice
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 50

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

That night our regt was
ordered out on picket to releive the
6th.. As I felt by this time nearly
sick I went to Dr. Richards and
he
asked an excuse which ^ readily
granted. This was the first Surgeons
excuse I had ever received since
entering the service.. That night
I suffered considerable and next
morning did not feel in very
good trim for following the regt
which was ordered to follow the
brigade. I again went to Dr Richards
who gave me some pills and told me
that I might ride in the ambulance
but if I could ride my horse I had
better do so even if I did no fighting
We reached Hagerstown where
I heard that the rebs who had
been entrenching themselves some
two miles from town since Saturday
had drawn in their pickets about
1 Oclock the night before and
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 51

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

slid out. Giving us another example
of Lee’s slipperyness.. Our cavalry
followed them to Williamsport and
finding none there went down the
river to Falling Waters on Dam No 4
where after considerable fight over
breastworks.. they captured a brigade
of rebel infantry numbering about
2000. two pieces of cannon and three
battle flags. One of the cannon was
captured by our new companies L &
M and one of the flags by Sergt Hol
ton.. The loss of our Co was one
wounded Chas. Malcolm who was
shot through the right side..
The loss in the brigade was
severe especially among officers and
the proportion of killed to wounded
was said by those who had an oppor
tunity to judge to be very heavy on both
sides.. The rebel loss in killed and
wounded was said to be much
greater than our own..
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 52

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

Sergt Cochrane of Co F was
shot through the head and died
instantly.. Major Weber of the
6th was killed by a ball through
the head: also Lieut Bolza of Co B.
of the 6th..
Sergt Cochran was 1st Sergt
of Co F and was a noble fellow enjoy
ing the love and esteem of all who
him
knew ^ whether among superiors.
comrades or inferiors.. He was about
one and twenty: Major Weber entered
the field as Capt of Co B of the 6th
and had received his Majors
commission only four days before.
and had not yet put on his
Major stripes.. He was a young
man not over three and twenty
and was loved by all who knew him
Lieut Bolza was also a young
man and would have succeeded
Major Weber in the command
of their Co..
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 53

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

The bodies of these three were
embalmed and sent to Washington
Michigan to be interred..
Many other officers were killed
or wounded but I did not learn
any names..
In reading this, one might
think that I took an active part in
this fight. They would be mistaken..
Soon after passing through Hagerstown
I was sent back to the place where
we had left our master rolls to
get them.. I remained there talking
with the merchants nearly an
hour and then started on after
the regiment.. After getting about
two miles from town I came to
the rebel fortifications which
were roughly constructed. and
though well posted did not
look very well strong..
I met a great many with
prisoners who had been
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 54

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

either unable to get across the
river or had purposely remained
behind.. Of the latter there
were a good many mostly North
Carolinians or Marylanders..
I went on to within two miles
of Williamsport and on the ground
of our fight at night of the 6th where
I met Sergt OBrien going back
to Hagerstown and liking company
I rode back with him..
We got some dinner and then
falling in with Capt. Moore & Sergt
Lucas I went with them out to join
the regiment.. We first went to
Williamsport where we found Lieut
Gray of Co B.. who had been left
behind by the rebs in their hurry
of crossing.. He had been a prisoner
since the 6th and had seen a good
share of Lee’s army.. He expressed
the opinion that 20000 resolute men
could have bagged the whole of
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 55

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

Lee’s army and said that it was
only by the greatest exertions of their
officers that a panic did not break
out among the troops in Williamsport
while crossing..
A short distance from the town
we fell in with Qrtr Master Doty
and the regtl wagons and kept along
with him that night camping
near the 2nd Corps. Next morning
Doty and I started ahead to find
the regt and proceeding a short dis
tance met the whole division return
ing.. We were told that we would
in
go to Berlin where we would go ^ to
camp for 30 days.. That day we marched
through Hagerstown to Boonesboro where
we staid over night and resumed the
march next day reaching Berlin
about 1 O’clock. It commenced
raining towards night and rained
some during the night and com
menced again next morning early
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 56

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

We had pitched our tents and
made preparations to stay awhile.
got our mail which we had not
received before for three weeks. but
about 6 Oclock Boots & Saddles sounded
and we were ordered to be ready to
move at 7 A.M. We crossed the
river on the pontoon bridge at Berlin
and found ourselves on the “Sacred
Soil” of Virginia about 11 Oclock..
We marched that day to Purcell
we
ville where ^ stayed until Sunday
morning.. On Saturday we made
out our payrolls correctly and sent
them in.. I had forgotten to state
that while at Berlin a consolidation
of the companies was effected [A?] & G
being consolidated and placed under
command of Capt Thompson.
Lieut Knight was sent back to Co D.
and Lieut Newman placed in
command of our Co.. which did not
suite us very well..
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 57

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

On Sunday we marched to Snicker
ville near Snickers Gap from there
to a small village four miles from
Upperville where the division halted
and the 1st Battalion of our regt
was sent out on picket while going
out to take up our position being in
advance with four others I captured
a “Johnny” who was straggling around
A short time afterwards a few
came up and fired on one of our pickets
but without hurting any one however.
In the afternoon the division was
moved out to Upperville while the 1st
and 7th were sent back to Purcell
ville to bring up the division train..
We marched until nearly midnight
before reaching there and. the remain
der of the train coming up we started
back about 3 A.M. and reached
Upperville about [6?] P.M. when
we moved into camp about a
mile from the town..
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 58

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

I had forgotten to state that
soon after the battle of Falling Waters
Genl Kilpatrick had obtained a
leave of absence for 20 days and
left Genl. Custer in command
of the division while Col Town of
the 1st took command of the brig
ade.. We remained at Upper
ville two days when the 7th went
to Ashby’s Gap while the division
moved on another road.. We reached
Paris a small town near the mouth
of the Gap about 5 P.M. and moved
on up the Gap. The pike from Aldie
and Hepperville ran directly through
the Gap. It was a distance of half a
mile to the top of the mountain
at a pretty steep grade: when we
reached the top of the mountain
we could see away across the Shenan
doah Valley to the Little North
Mountains on the farther side.
A long line of dust could be seen
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 59

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

apprently near the foot of the
mountains supposed to be made by
Lees wagon train. The sun being nearly
down and the Valley filled with the
thin, blue vapor common to mountainous
countries the view though beautiful
was not very clear.. The 2nd Battalion
was left on picket and the 1st after ad
ers
vancing through the Gap as skirmish^
mounted and dismounted to the Shenan
doah river returned to the camp where
the 3d Battalion was. We lay here next
day.. The 12th corps passed us and went
on towards Warrenton. that day
[Next?] morning bright and early
started on to join the division..
We halted for dinner near the
small town of Orleans and found
the division at Amyssville. A portion
of our cavalry had a fight that
same day near Thorntons Gap
with a crop of rebel infantry
and were whipped..
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 60

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

Saturday morning we saddled
up and started with the whole brig
n
ade and battery to occupy Thor^ton’s
Gap, but found the 1st brigade already
there and so we turned back and
went into camp.. About 5 PM we
received the order to go on picket and
reached our reserve at about dusk.
Our rations had given out early in
the morning and our train being far
behind we were unable to draw any
more and prospects looked gloomy
enough for a tour of picket duty for
twenty four hours even. We managed
to get a little for supper. To add to our
discomfort a heavy rain storm came up
and lasted nearly all night.. I came
in from my post about ten Oclock and
we could find no place that we could get
under shelter.. so spreading our Poncho’s
on the ground we crawled under one
had pleasure
and ^ the melancholy ^ of finding myself
completely wet through next morning
[several words illegible in original] sound sleep..
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 61

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

I dried myself by a fire so that when
it came time to go on post again I felt very
well for a hungry man.. As it required
but two men at a post during the day time
we sent the extra four men foraging beyond
the lines. After we were relieved Crocker &
OBrien. came in having been out about
two miles. bringing in a little.. Matchett & [Luigo?]
had gone on. beyond a road where only the
night before rebel pickets had stood..
They returned about an hour later having
met with better success. than Crocker & O’
Brien. and seeing no rebs. After they
had eaten their breakfast Cos A & G under
command of Lieut Newman. started out forag
ing.. We went the same road that the
others did only going farther intending to
visit a certain Mr Browne near the bank of
Hazel River who was said to have large quantities
of corn ham and bacon. but on arriving in
sight of the house we also came in sight
of rebel pickets on the opposite bank of the river
and Lieut Newman thought best to turn
back which we accordingly did
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 62

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

That night we were on picket all
night. being releived next morning about
10 Oclock when the whole detachment
under command of Capt Thompson
were ordered out foraging again
It was the intention at starting to visit old
Brown and become the possessors of this bacon, ham
and corn. We proceeded leisurely some two
miles visiting certain houses a short distance
from the road.. While stopping at one of these
I was sent ahead with 3 men and ordered to
take my post at a point where a road came
from thick, close woods into the road we
were then on. and which was some ¾ of a
mile ahead.. I had been at this point
nearly half an hour when a volley of
musketry in the rear told me that they
had found some “Johnny’s” and knowing
that a large wood between them and
me afforded an excellent chance for
them to cut me off I fell back towards
the column. It seems that a squad
of some 15 had gone to a house nearly
[1/4?] of a mile from the road had been
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 63

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

fired on by a body of rebel infantry
whose number could not be estimated
As it was not thought advisable
to pick a quarrel with them the column
was turned to the left through a piece of
woods and we went foraging another
way.. We wandered about until
near night when we returned to night
camp laden with flour, meal, corn.
pork and geese.. One little incident
which amused us somewhat I will record.
We had just finished “robbing” a widow
lady. (mother of two fair daughters) of some
corn and flour. and being satrated sated,
with our glory we turned our faces.
campward.. We had proceeded but a
little ways when we came upon a large
flock of geese.. Someone near the head of the
column spoke of “charging” them, but no
one started until we saw Lieut Sessions
start when the whole column was
immediately broken up.. I started. and
drawing my sabre charged one and
giving him a ‘left cut against infantry’ laid
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 64

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

fired on by a body of rebel infantry
whose number could not be estimated
As it was not thought advisable
to pick a quarrel with them the column
was turned to the left through a piece of
woods and we went foraging another
way.. We wandered about until
near night when we returned to night
camp laden with flour, meal, corn.
pork and geese.. One little incident
which amused us somewhat I will record.
We had just finished “robbing” a widow
lady. (mother of two fair daughters) of some
corn and flour. and being satrated sated,
with our glory we turned our faces.
campward.. We had proceeded but a
little ways when we came upon a large
flock of geese.. Someone near the head of the
column spoke of “charging” them, but no
one started until we saw Lieut Sessions
start when the whole column was
immediately broken up.. I started. and
drawing my sabre charged one and
giving him a ‘left cut against infantry’ laid
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 65

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

given them to him that morning but that
he knew nothing of the pistol.. I reported
the case to Col Litchfield. who seemed willing to
do all in his power to recover them for me..
But as I was obliged to go on picket I.
had no time to attend to it and when next
we stopped it was too late to identify any
person sufficiently to arrest him.. That morning
the regt was ordered on picket.. Cos A, G. & D
were sent to Jefferson. some four miles dis
tant.. We arrived there during a smart
shower. and remained ‘till near dusk
when the 1st Pa. Cav. of Gregg’s division
was came out and releived us, while we were
ordered back to camp. which we reached
about midnight. We were routed out at
five next morning and after the usual
delay.. marched about eight and did
not stop to feed or for anything else. any
length of time until we reached this place
where we went into camp. The day was
very hot and we reached camp tired
hungry, heated and dusty.. This was on
Friday July 31st
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 66

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

Saturdy everything opened
well and we begun to think of rest, but
about noon came “Boots & Saddles” and we
packed up After drawing rations, feeding
horses cooking some “grub” and waiting a couple
of hours the order came to unsaddle. discharge
our revolvers and clean them.. A detail
of [illegible in original] men was made from our Co.
and a proportionate number from other Cos
also [100?] men from the 5th to go with Col
Mann on a raid after Moseby..
We started about 4 P.M.. Col.
Litchfield taking Cos A. G. & D. and going
by way of [Sigele?] church and Auburn Mills
a distance of some eight miles. where we
stopped for the night in a piece of woods
where we stopped on a former raid some
two months before. Next morning we moved
on early. our co. being sent ahead and I
with four men went to a house where we got
a negro boy who had acted as our guide
before. Our route lay across the mountains
to Salem. from there to White Plains

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 67

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

where we joined Col Mann who had
gone by way of Thoroughfare Gap to this
place. We went into camp about 1 ½
miles from the village where we remained
over night.. A negro brought us the
report that White and Moseby, with a
force of some 400 men were going to attack
us that night.. But they did not come..
The next morning we started quite
early and moved on toward Middle
burg. through which a part of the detach
ment charged capturing one man..
A part of us were sent up into
the mountains where we got a number
of horses. and cattle and heard that
White and Moseby were farther up
the mountains. [illegible in original] followed
them for a time when we turned around
and went on to Goose Creek where we
stopped near a mill for dinner.
We drew rations from the mill
consisting of flour meal and corn [illegible due to tear]
rye for our horses..
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863, Page: 68

Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary July 6, 1863 through August 9, 1863

[From?] there we moved on about 5
[illegible in original] stopped at night near the
[illegible in original] church. 1½ miles from Aldie
and [illegible in original] residence of the famous
[illegible in original].. Here next morning
Lieut Newman got into a quarrel with a
[waiter?] of Capt Clark of the 5th a little boy
and ordered [illegible in original] him. But I did
not [illegible in original] it just then and flatly told
[illegible in original] would’n’t [illegible in original] got in
[illegible in original] myself. and a [few?] [illegible in original] being sent
in to camp I [illegible in original] in [well?] them..
Abour forty men under command of
Lieut [illegible in original] fought with two prisoners
[illegible in original] that night [illegible in original] Hay market
[remainder of page illegible in original]

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