Title

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

Back

Creator: Edwin R. Havens
Subjects: Civil War, 1861-1865
Date: 1860-1869
Format: Image/jpg
Original Format: Document
Collection Number: LC00016 – Havens Family Papers, Box 2, Volume 1
Language: English
Rights Management: Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by Michigan State University and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the University Archives & Historical Collections, Michigan State University.
Contributing Institution: Michigan State University Archives & Historical Collections
Relation: LC00016 – Havens Family Papers, Box 2, Volume 1
Contributor: MSU Archives and Historical Collections
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 1

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

Edwin R Havens. Grand Rapids
Co. ‘A’ 7th Mich Cavalry Kent County
Lee Barracks Jan 28th Michigan
“1863”

Edwin R. Havens
Capt. Walkers Company
7th Michigan Cavalry..



Camp Kellogg

Grand Rapids
G
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 2

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

At Home Saturday Oct 18, 1862..
It has been a long time since I wrote
in my last journal.. If I remember rightly
it was about the last of June.. Since that
time changes of some importance have taken
place in my prospects for some time to come..
On the 30th day of June last I entered the
store of [Dc?] Armond and Fulton as a clerk at 7 dollars
per month.. I liked the business very well. but found
it rather confining to be obliged to stay in the store
day and night from Monday morning to Sat
urday night with but little cessation from
toil..
I remained with them until the 12th
day of September. when I enlisted as a soldier
in Capt Walkers company, then forming at Niles
and Battle Creek for the seventh Mich Cavalry..
I enlisted on the occasion of a war meeting
which was addressed by E.L. Fitch of Berrien Town
ship and Esq.. Taylor of Niles City..
While J. Sparks. A. Park and W. Sparks were
riding home on horseback. they commenced racing
their horses. when after running some ways they
overtook M. Price in a buggy, and John in at
tempting to pass him, did not draw his horse
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 3

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

2
sufficiently to one side, but struck one of his
legs against one of the wheels breaking his leg between
knee
the foot and ^ very badly.. His horse by jumping to
threw
one side burst the saddle girth and throwing him to
the ground.. He was carried to Mrs Bunkers. and Dr
[Posten?] called to dress the limb.. His Father and Mother
were sent for and reached there about one oclock..
The Dr Soon after dressed his leg and he was then
put upon a bed in a wagon and taken home.. The
next morning Dr Andrews of Niles was sent for, and he
soon set the limb, which would hav probably have
done well, had it not, by some accident, been put out
of place and requiring about three weeks afterwards,
ed
to be reset. Since that time he has slowly improv^..
On the 22nd of September at 11 oclock P.M.
we left Niles for Grand Rapids, to commence our
life as soldiers.. We reached Kalamazoo, between 1 and 2
oclock that night. and staid there the remainder of the
night.. Some of the boys slept in their blankets
on the floor, others in chairs, and every position
they could find.. but George Lee found a room at an-
other hotel.. and invited me to share it with him..
So that I had a bed, although I doubt not, that
many of those who slept upon the floor had a
softer bed than I did..
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 4

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

3
We left Kalamazoo by stage for
Grand Rapids between 7 and 8 oclock A.. M.. ..
Thirty three passengers with their baggage
made two good sized coach. loads. The morning
was clear and warm. the country quite a pleasant.
one and being new to us, we found enough to enjoy
ourselves first rate.
After noon there commenced a change
in both weather and country.. The wind blew up
cool. and a few dark clouds, which had hung just
above the western horizon, for some two hours began
to move up and were closely followed by others, darker
and more threatening. The country was more
rolling. and of a poorer quality. The houses and
settlements smaller and farther apart.. About 5
oclock P.. M. it commenced a slight drizzling
rain, and the last seven miles of our journey
were passed in a moody silence.. Those on the out
side of the coaches wrapping themselves up in
blankets and everything they could obtain..
We had the good fortune however not to
get very wet. and reached Grand Rapids a little
after [6?] P.M. cold, tired and hungry..
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 5

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

4
As soon as possible we procured supper, intending
to go to the camp. which they told us was situated about
one and a half miles from where we then were..
As it continued to rain after we had eaten our sup
per, we finally prevailed upon our officers to allow us
to stay there until morning, and very soon after
ward spread our blankets upon the floor of the room
which our landlord had given us, to occupy for the
night, and I slept very soundly, for me..
Next morning we were all up by daylight: but
it was after Seven oclock before we got our men all
together, and started for Camp Kellogg. Although
each man had quite a load of baggage to carry, we
I found the distance much less than had been repre
sented, and reached camp as the companies were
finishing their breakfast. As our company had
no cooking utensils they were obliged to borrow those
of another, after they had finished their breakfast..
We did not consequently obtain our breakfast till after
nine oclock, and as we were very hungry we were glad
to eat, what many of us [illegible in original] would have refused at home
Some of our company from Battle Creek who had
reached here they day before we did had not eaten
anything since 2 oclock P.M. Tuesday.

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 6

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

5

At dinner we had some dishes given us consis
ting of plates. cups. knives and forks, which had been used
before by some company. and thrown away.. They were
all covered with a good coat of rust. there was no
help for plates and cups. But each one secured a knife
and fork. and seating themselves upon the ground pro
ceeded to scour them in the dirt, and it was not long
before they were quite passable.. We had in the mean time
secured good comfortable quarters in barracks. which seemed
more desirable than the tents which some of the com-
panies occupied..
Being all new recruits it took two or three days
to become acquainted with the ways of the camp and the
duties devolving upon us.. Our 1st Lieut left us
a day or two afterwards we got there, and E L. Fitch
our
who was ^ conductor there. left for home at the same time.
leaving us with only Capt Walker as the only officer with us..
He appointed C.M. Holton to act as Orderly Sergeant.
and E.D. Crocker as Commissary Sergeant..
As our Capt was unlearned in the drill he was obliged
to drill with the officers four hours each day, and there being no
well
very good drilled man in our ranks, we did not drill any for
nearly a week.. Two or three days after we got there it was
found necessary to build some more barracks, and men
from each company were wanted to work upon them..
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 7

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

6
As all of the men in our company volunteered to work
upon them, the Captain concluded to detail some, and accordingly
appointed six of. those who made the most pretensions to
e
being carpenters.. the new barracks were finish^d and we
moved into them on Monday afternoon Sept 29..
We found them warmer and more comfortable than those
we had just left.. As three or four of the boys in our squad
had worked on them, they had taken pains to secure the most
comfortable bunk in the quarters assigned to our company..
and we found ourselves very comfortably situated..
We now found ourselves obliged to drill from 9. to
11 oclock A.M. and from two to four P.M. and to go on
dress parade at 5. P.M… It did not take us long to drill
very well and we soon recovered from our embarrassment
which we felt upon going on parade the first time..
Soon after going into our new quarters, a contract
was let to a [illegible in original] citizen of Grand Rapids to furnish the
rations for the seventh regt at 21cts per day for each man..
We were now obliged to go out of camp about ¼ of a
mile to our meals.. Many had complained bitterly of
their fare while we cooked as a company by ourselves.. and al
though we fared much better they grumbled still worse..
and as we became more comfortably situated and our victuals
became better every day, they grumbled the more..
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 8

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

7
After we had been in camp about a week
rumors began to circulate among us that E.L. Fitch,
whom we expected to have as our 2nd Lieutenant could
not get the situation and consequently would not go
with us. This of course created a good deal of discontent
among the men whom he had enlisted. Some declared
that they would never muster in unless he went as
our Lieut. Our Capt told us that there was
some hopes of bringing it around, although it was
also somewhat doubtful. Other reports that we would
be placed in some old regiment also caused a great
deal of discontent. and more threats of a like nature..
The delay in getting the companies mustered.
together with the severe restrictions imposed upon
the men by Col Grey caused more threats and
discontent. and for nearly two weeks the camp was
in a perfect uproar.. the discontent finally
became so great that it created almost a mutiny..
One evening about 300. men and two or three
officers belonging in the 6th Regt assembled near
our quarters. and of course were soon joined by
a number from our company and others in
the 7th. Speeches were made. resolutions passed and
a dertimination determination to leave the
camp in a body on the following Saturday
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 9

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

8
morning unless they should be mustered..
The Col. and other officers being sent for reached
the ground as soon as possible and dispersed the crowd..
But it was plain to be seen that it had produced
an effect upon the Col.. He next day appointed
Capt Thos. H. Botham to act as Col.. of the 7th Regt
and telegraphed to Detroit for the mustering officer..
Lieut Col. Smith reached there on the succeeding
Friday and proceeded to muster the companies of the 6th
as speedily as possible.. Capt Walker who had been
trying very hard to get our company mustered at the
same time with the 6th at last received a promise
from Col.. Kellogg and Col Smith that we shuld be
mustered.. But on Saturday.. [illegible in original] Botham,
[illegible in original] and Darling prevailed upon them to
post pone the mustering of our company until
Wednesday Oct 22nds Capt Walker learning this
waited upon Col Kellogg and plainly told him that
unless we were mustered at that time. he should dis-
charge his men and that they might go home.
This brought them to terms. and we were accord
ingly mustered on Monday Oct.. 13th..
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 10

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

Most of the men now wanted to go home..
but as they had not received any money since they had
been there and most of them were destitute of money
sufficient to get home with. they did not know what
to do.. It was soon found that the men of the 6th Regt
were selling their certificates of bounty at 23 to 23 ½
dollars for 25. We then began to look around for a
chance to dispose of ours.. But it was hard to find
any one who felt disposed [mark illegible in original] to purchase ours..
Newton Sparks. Allen Park and Wm Graham.
had got furloughs as soon as possible after being
mustered and finally succeeded, about 10 oclock at night
in disposing of their bounties for 23 dollars. each.
and left Grand Rapids about 4 oclock A.M. Tuesday..
As soon as possible after breakfast. I got passed
out to go down town and finally disposed of mine at
the same place and rate.
I then got a furlough.. and got our things
in a shape which I thought would be safe to leave
them in.. and took the stage at 3. A.M. Wednesday
Oct 15. and reached Kalamazoo about 1. P.M. and
Buchanan about 5 P.M.. and home about 7 P..M..
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 11

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

Most of the men now wanted to go home..
but as they had not received any money since they had
been there and most of them were destitute of money
sufficient to get home with. they did not know what
to do.. It was soon found that the men of the 6th Regt
were selling their certificates of bounty at 23 to 23 ½
dollars for 25. We then began to look around for a
chance to dispose of ours.. But it was hard to find
any one who felt disposed [mark illegible in original] to purchase ours..
Newton Sparks. Allen Park and Wm Graham.
had got furloughs as soon as possible after being
mustered and finally succeeded, about 10 oclock at night
in disposing of their bounties for 23 dollars. each.
and left Grand Rapids about 4 oclock A.M. Tuesday..
As soon as possible after breakfast. I got passed
out to go down town and finally disposed of mine at
the same place and rate.
I then got a furlough.. and got our things
in a shape which I thought would be safe to leave
them in.. and took the stage at 3. A.M. Wednesday
Oct 15. and reached Kalamazoo about 1. P.M. and
Buchanan about 5 P.M.. and home about 7 P..M..
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 12

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

11

Camp. Kellogg.. Oct 28, 1862

Returned here last night after an
absence of nearly two weeks.. We spent
the time allowed us by our furloughs
very well. the weather while we were
at home was. most of the time good..
We visited with all of the friends.
rode around, and did everything we could
to make every it pleasant to the folks and
ourselves.. We had one of the best of parties
at Mr Alexanders on Wednesday evening
at Mrs. Snyders
last.. and another on Friday evening last. ^
On Friday Evening however it snowed
very hard and was a most disagreeable nights
yet there was quite a large assembly..
We left Niles on Sunday evening last
and spent a very pleasant time there that
evening while waiting for the cars as many
of our friends were there to see us off..
We reached Kalamazoo about 2 oclock
A.M. and staid until 7½ A..M..
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 13

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

12
We had as usual a large stage load
of passengers and baggage. nearly all being.
soldiery.. The day was clear and pleasant
but quite cool., there was considerable frost
Sunday night and it did not get entirely
off in some places till nearly noon..
We reached Grand Rapids about 5 Oclock
P.M. and came to camp immediately after..
there has been considerable improvement
made in camp since we went away.
We now have stoves in our barracks. and
as they kept a very large fire it was too
warm to be very comfortable..
We also found our clothing ready for
us. and to day we have. drawn jackets, pants,
shirts and blankets., A great quantity of
other clothing is also ready. but has not been
distributed..
We have drilled in battalion today
and being entirely new to me it
was rather perplexing..
The 6th is making preparations for
receiving their horses. a part of which we
expected this week..
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 14

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

13

Camp. Kellogg. Wednesday Oct 29 /62

We have had a very pleasant day. clear
and quite warm for the time of year..
There has been indications of a storm this
afternoon.. More clothing has been com
ing since yesterday. But we have not yet drawn
any more.. But some few of them drew
their boots.. Boxes containing socks, blouses,
and overcoats are now in the quarter masters
department [mark illegible in original] and will be distributed in a few
days. We have drilled in squad and battallion
drills to day.. We were practiced on the principle
of obliquing in squads this forenoon. this
afternoon in wheeling in platoons and squad
rons. and also in changing directions [mark illegible in original] by both
right and left flanks. and in deploying on
the different squadrons..
Our fare is very good. and is generally ready
in good time.. Men are at work today, building
quartermasters buildings and I think that
we may soon get to cooking our meals by
companies again.
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 15

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

14
Camp Kellogg. Thursday Oct. 30 /62

The day has been quite pleasant and
warm.. We drilled this forenoon in squad
rows. and this afternoon in battalion.
Our drill was wheeling and also a new
movement of line to the rear..
Capt Botham put us through over
two hours and we felt pretty tired when
we got through.
Capt Walker returned this even
ing and also Wm OBrien and Chas
[illegible in original]..
Capt Walker brought the report
that Gov Blair would pay our expenses
home to attend election. At This may
be true. still it may not do me any
good..
Col Mann has not yet come. neither
has the paymaster.. although these are
pay days..
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 16

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

15

Niles Monday. November 3d 1862.
I will now endeavor to finish up my Journal
since Thursday last.. Friday was a very warm and
pleasant day.. We went through our usual routine
of drill both forenoon and afternoon.. that evening we
drew our overcoats and socks… and we are now able to present
a quite different appearance while at home than we did when
at home before.. Friday evening A.C. Parks. W.G. Graham
and N. Sparks. took it into their heads for some reason or
other to go home and obtained furloughs, leaving Reynolds
and myself. alone in charge of our bunk and its
contents. I had obtained a pass from the Capt and
for Reynolds and myself to go to the city and
get our suits which we were having trimmed..
About 7 oclock a fire broke out in the Fountain
St Brewery and as soon as discovered a general
stampede and breaking guard took place in camp.
and the authorities sent out a patrol guard with
orders to arrest all soldiers found in the city with
out furloughs or passes.. It was my fortune
to be arrested and on producing my pass the
Lieut in charge pronounced it “no good”
and informed me that I must go back
to camp and thinking that it was the best
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 17

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

16

that I could do. I fell into the ranks and
marched back to camp.. thinking that I
stood a very good chance of lodging in the guard
house that night.. but the sergeant in command
of the squad although a stranger. not thinking
I had done anything deserving that disgrace
told me that as soon as I got inside the line of
of sentries. to go to my quarters which permission
thanks
I was not loth to take advantage of. with sincere ^..
to him for his kindness..
Saturday morning after detailing three
men for guard, besides the cooks. and one or two
others for special duties. it was found that we
had eight men for drill.. these few men were
drilled an hour by Q. Serg.. Chas O. Pratt..
med
After returning to our quarters we were infor^
by Capt Walker that we could have furloughs
if we desired them. and Reynolds and myself.
together with nine others from our company
11
left Camp Kellogg about ^ oclock A.M. for
home. It was too late in the day for us to obtain
passage by stage, so after joining company with two
others. from another company we concluded to hire a
conveyance if possible to carry us half way.
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 18

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

But there was none to be obtained in the
city and we finally concluded to set out on foot..
After going about half a mile we met a man with
a team and woodrack. and on bantering him. he told
us that if we would obtain the consent of the owner of the
team he would take us to the Half.way House. that after
noon.. the owner was soon found and he gave his con
sent to taking us that distance for .75cts pr. head..
Thinking that quite reasonable we agreed to pay it
and soon seated ourselves “spoon fashion” on a board
running lengthwise through a low wagon box..
Reaching the tavern at Chambers Corners we
found three others of our company who had just eaten
their supper and who now joined us.. We reached the
Halfway House about half past. 7. oclock and finding that
we could not obtain a team there to take us to Kalamazoo
Walters
we ordered our supper. while Richardson and Mealoy
who had eaten, went on the next 6 miles. to hire a
team if possible to take us to Kalamazoo in time for
the 2 oclock train going west..
After eating our supper we left the Halfway
House about half past eight oclock.. and walked
the next 6 miles in about 2 hours and found
two good teams waiting to take us through

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 19

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

18

We paid the 60cts asked for the accommodations
and were whirled to Kalamazoo half an hour before
train time.. But what was our surprise to see the
three who had left camp the evening before, seated in
the depot house. also waiting for the train they had
walked nearly the whole distance from Grand Rapids..
travelling all the previous night and looking rather
the worse for wear.. We reached home about 7 oclock
on Sunday morning surprising our. folks greatly
by our sudden and unexpected appearance..
Having been up all the night previous I con
sequently sought a bed after I had procured my break
fast, and slept nearly all day.. the day was an un
pleasant one, being stormy and cold.. It cleared up
during the night and is quite pleasant again this
morning..
While coming through. Buchanan I noticed
the effects of a very severe fire. which had taken
place during the past week.. and on making in
quiries at home I learned that about half past
two P.M. Friday a fire had. broken out in the
building formerly used by Roe as a company
machine shop. caused by sparks from the
smoke stack of E.M. Roe’s steam works.
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 20

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

19

It destroyed that building and then
caught in the store of Ross. Bainton & Co.. in which
they saved most of the goods.. It then caught the
grocery of Redden & Mead. they saving a part of
their stock.. It next caught and destroyed the
dwelling and millinery shop of Mrs Dutton
and the blacksmith shop of J. Kelley..
Crossing the street it soon destroyed the
brick building of Ross. Alexander and Co.. occupied
by De. Armond and Fulton. with the Masonic Hall
in the third story.. Then the Saloon of S. Bishop.
the small wooden building not occupied belong
ing to Ross & Alexander.. the paint shop of Hull and
Mead. the blacksmith shop. of P.F. Ingersol..
the livery stable of J. M Russell. burning up
all of his cutters and sleighs.. the shoe shop
of H.F. Strong. the tailor shop of S.. W Epley.
The barber Shop of. Prince of Denmark. the butche
shop of J. Lord and Brother.. the old shop formerly
occupied by Wm Streets. and the house and
barn of D. Carlisle.. destroying about twenty
buildings and causing a loss of property
amounting to nearly 10,000 dollars in value
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 21

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

20
Camp Kellogg. Sunday November. 9. /62
Here I am. back in our old quarters again. having
reached camp about 7 oclock last evening..
foregoing
After finishing up the previous pages on Mon
day last. I went to Buchanan. with W. Graham
and A. Park. and found [De?] Armond and Fulton
again in business and occupying the building
opposite the Fremont House.. and Ross. Bainbow & Co.
occupying the lower story of the Fremont House..
The boys told me that Newt Sparks was sick and
on visiting him in the evening I found him
down with the lung fever.. He had been taken sick
on Sunday after reaching home and was compelled
to send for Dr. Roc on Monday.. Chester Calvin en
listed on Monday morning..
we
Tuesday was election day. and ^ went to Niles to
attend the election.. We met Capt Walker who had
come through the day and night before..
I also met and visited with several of the
young folks..
On Wednesday I went to Niles and Cap
Walker and I procured a team, and started out to
try our luck recruiting.. It commenced raining
just as we left Niles and continued to rain
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 22

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

20
until it increased to considerable of a show
in which lasted until about 3 oclock P.. M..
We drove to Buchanan and from there to
Berrien where we took dinner.. I reached home
about 5. P.M.. failing to get a single recruit..
I visited Newt again in the evening, and
found him a great deal better than when I
last saw him..
On Thursday. I went out alone to try my
luck. but failed again.. I went to Buchanan
in the afternoon. to see Ed Batchelor. but could not
induce him to enlist.. It commenced to snow about
four oclock and next morning the ground
was white with snow..
Friday morning I bade our folks. “good bye”
as I expect for the last time for a long time
to come.. Nell and I went to visit Isom and
the family.. We spent the rest of the day there
and then went to Dowagiac in the evening, where
I took the cars.. I found Capt Walker. together
with six or eight of our company about the
train. and we all came through to Kalamazoo
together.. I found Chester Calvin, and Royal
Tuttle, who had also enlisted, with the Capt
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 23

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863


22
Captain Walker staid in Kalamazoo on bus
iness, while the rest of us came on through..
The day was clear but cold making an out
side seat not very desirable.. At Chambers. Corners
I found that Tuttle had deserted us at Kala
mazoo.. We reached the city about 6 oclock,
after a cold and tedious journey..
Reynolds. Park and Graham did not come
through. waiting, for some whim or other ‘till
yesterday and consequently they will not be
here today.. Newt Sparks was so ill that
it was necessary to leave him
The camp presents about the same
appearance it did when we left it a week
ago.. They tell me that Col Mann has arrived
but I have not yet seen him.. Several hun
dred horses are here for the 6th. I have not
had time to examine them very closely
but they look very well.. It is said that
the arms for the 6th have also arrived..
I found three letters awaiting me in
camp. One from G.W. Lee.. one from J.R
Cowles, and one from Irenus MacGowan
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 24

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

23
Camp Kellogg. Monday. Nov. 10
Last night was quite a cold one and
this morning the ground was white with
frost.. Today has been very pleasant and
not too cool for comfort. We drilled
our usual hours of drill under the lead of
E.D. Cook. Sergeant. acting Capt during the
absence of the superior officers.
Col Smith has come to pay off the 6th
Regt which will be done tomorrow..
Col Kellogg was on the ground y this
afternoon and told some of the men that
in all probability the 7th would not be paid
until it was full. and had been mustered
in.. This will cause a great deal of discon
tent and threats of mutiny. as some of the
men have got it into their heads that we
can not be held in service over two months
without being paid. I consider this a very
erroneous idea and feel no inclination to
attempt to take a furlough of my own.. on the
security..
Park. Graham. Reynolds. Howe and
Walters came in last night and
Pierce, Wilcox and Capt Walker to day

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 25

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

24
The Sixth has received several hundred of
their horses, and it is some support sport
to see them as they take them to and
from water. three times a day..
They are very good ones as a general thing.
Many of them are among the first qualities
of farm horses..
ed
There have been several boxes unload^
at their Quartermasters office today
marked Mini Rifles.. and from this I
should infer that they would soon be
armed and equipped. and perhaps be
dispatched to the field..
Captain Rotham has resigned
his position and gone home and so
far as I know, few if any are sorry..
I despatched Newts sachel to him
this evening.. As many of our things
keep disappearing occasionally in a very
mysterious manner. we have formed
a society, composed of such as we feel safe
in trusting one of whom will stay in
the barracks a half a day at a time to
try and discover the depredatory..
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 26

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

25
Camp Kellogg Thursday Nov 13..
We are not doing any thing at drill today.
as we are waiting to receive our pay. Col Smith
being here to muster the remaining companies
of the 7th and to pay them and also the
6th their bounty money and premium..
He paid the 6th yesterday and day before.
and is busy today mustering the 7th
Tuesday last was a very stormy day. com
mencing to rain about 11 oclock A.M. and
continuing nearly all night.. Wednesday
was quite clear but also quite cold..
We drilled during the day our usual hours..
Col Mann arrived on the ground yesterday
forenoon. and about the same time a brass
band from Detroit also came here..
They have been engaged by Col Mann
to accompany the regiment.
On Tuesday we drew the remainder of
our clothing consisting of one blouse, one
cap. one shirt, one pair of drawers and to
those who desired to draw them one pair
of boots..
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 27

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

26
As there are a good many complaining
of the loss of clothing and other things we formed
a society of a few who we could [illegible in original] trust.
to try and ferret out the thieves. one of the
members of the society to be detailed to stay
in the barracks half a day at a time to
watch them..
Sergeants Holton and Loomis returned
to camp Tuesday evening with several others of
the company together with five new recruits..
Quartermaster Sergt Chas O Pratt also
returned on Tuesday morning..
One of the new recruits brought in by
Holton and Loomis was rejected, and returned
in
home yesterday.. The remain^g ones have
not yet been mustered but will before Col
Smith leaves the camp..
Alex. Downy returned at the same
time with Holton and reported Newt
Sparks suffering from a relapse.. Sergt
W.H. OBrien was taken ill on Monday
and was sent to the hospital from which
he returned this morning..
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 28

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

27
We procured a box this morning and
assorted our clothing. boxing up with the
intention of sending home such articles as
we do not deem absolutely necessary to our
comfort.
The report was received here last
night that an armistice of sixty days
had been entered into by the two belligerent
parties of this struggle. But which is not
very generally credited.. It would be one
of the most favorable things that could
happen for the south.. as it would give them
time to prepare for the struggle which would
ensue afterwards. unless they should in the inter
val, conclude a peace..
Boxes containing saddles and bridles
for the 7th were received on the ground yesterday
and more are reported as being at the Rail Road
Depot..
No horses have as yet been received..
It is reported that winter quarters are to be erected
for us and that we are to remain here till spring..
Alterations are to be made also in our boarding
arrangements which it is to be hoped will prove
favorable to us.
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 29

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

28
Camp Kellogg. Saturday Nov 15. /62
We received our bounty from Col. Smith
yesterday morning, but as I had sold mine
soon after being mustered in I did not
received anything for it yesterday.
Col. Mann told us after being paid
that every man who wanted a furlough
might have one for ten days.. a great
many consequently took advantage of
this. and today the 7th regiment is
rather slim.. There were not more
than sixty men belonging to the en
tire regiment at dinner today.
This morning the Orderly detail
ed five privates and one corporal for
guard, but after we came in from
drill we were ordered to fall in ranks
again, and after treating to the cigars
bought as we suppose by Capt Walker..
he detailed sixteen more privates for
some reason or other.. unknown
to us..

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 30

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

29

We expressed a box containing
night
our clothing last ^ to Father and I
also sent him a short note contain
ing the receipt for the same..
Col Mann started for Detroit some
time either last night or this morning
leaving Capt Walker in command of
the regiment..
some
Col Mann told us last night that
u
we wo^ld have no more dress parade
until we had 800 men on the ground..
Springer, Knights and Caines
returned this morning bringing
three new recruits with them..
We had a dress parade on Thursday
under the direction of Col Mann
which was altogether a different mat
ter from anything we have ever had
before
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 31

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

30
Camp Kellogg. Sunday Nov. 16 /62
This Sunday Eve is the second one that I
have spent in this camp for more than
a month.. Today I have been to church
and also attended religious Services on the
ground..
Sergeant Cook. Harrison. Richardson
Reynolds. Park. Graham and myself.
went out about 9. O.clock A.M. and went
down the railroad to the depot, and
from there to the city where Reynolds and
Graham left us and went to the plaster bed
about two miles from the city. while the rest
of us went to the Baptist Church..
It being Sunday the cooks did not get
us but two meals. dinner at two O.clock.
After dinner the chaplain of the 6th held
services on the ground, and Capt Walker wish
ing to have his company make as good an
appearance. as any, formed up and marched
us to the ground. and afterwards we went on
parade with the 6th.
I might as well say that the entire
7th regiment went on parade as well as to say
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 32

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

31

that our company went. for the men
of the other companies. joined with ours to
make up the company. the Second Lieut
of Capt Warners company acted as 1st
Lieut of the company.
He is a young man, not over twen
ty years of age. and small for that age..
and many of our men deride him think
ing him too young. But he has been in service
before and I have a pretty good opinion of him..
It commenced to rain soon aftered parade
was dismissed and has rained slightly ever
since. It has been much warmer today than
for several days before, and this rain is not en
tirely unlooked for..
Capt Walker enlisted two men to day..
one for bugler. the other as private..
The prospect for leaving this camp grows surer
every day.. It is now reported that Copelands Regt
is to leave Detroit on Friday next. and it is thought
that we will move from here soon after, either
to Detroit or to Kalamazoo. I think to the
former if either. But have no choice..
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 33

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

32

Camp Kellogg. Tuesday Nov. 18. /62.
The week has been warmer than usual
since Sunday and today has been rather lowsy
and the greater part of this afternoon it has mis
ted slightly.. Yesterday morning as many of the
sixth as had been supplied with horses. came
out on drill mounted and drilled during
the forenoon. there was much less bad work
than I expected to see the first time they were
mounted..
In the afternoon our Captain told us
that if the company desired. we would go
as a company to the theater. So in the evening
we went down. The play was entitled the
Beacon of Death. but although it was the
first time I ever attended such a place I was
not very much interested in what I saw there
This morning after coming from
breakfast the Capt told us that he
wanted all to go down to the railroad
to unload several car loads of equipments
for the regiment. which he thought would
take about an hour.
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 34

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

33

It was nearly 9 O.clock when we
got there but it was 1. Oclock before we
got to work. unloading having been obliged
to wait for the train..
The loading consisted of saddles
and bridles for the cavalry.. the cannon
carriages. caissons. horses equipments
for the battery of Artillery.. and one box
of cavalry sabres..
The cannon are 3 inch Rifle
steel guns. and 12 pounder howitzer
cartridges for the guns. and three
kegs of powder.
Newton Sparks returned to
camp this evening reporting every
thing all right at home..
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 35

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

34
22.
Camp Kellogg. Saturday Nov
The weather since Tuesday has been
variable. one or two days warm and a
greeable the others cold and uncom
fortable.. Our duties too since then
have been various. some drilling but
the greater part of the time laboring
for the Quartermaster. loading
and unloading boxes. cutting and
piling brush. and other duties
Wednesday a part of the company
were detailed to help load the horses
at the railroad. some of the others to
unload them at the camp. and
the rest of us drilled
Thursday was about the same
The cannons and carriages were hauled
upon on the drill ground just outside
the camp lines and now stand in a
line across the field. and if mounted
would present a rather saucy appear
ance..
Yesterday morning we were in
terrupted in drill by the Quarter
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 36

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

35

master to assist him in making
a new road but which was finally
postponed, but we were set to work
piling brush.. and while doing this
the Quartermaster and Major de
cided to see what our little [bull?] logs
looked liked and consequently tooke of
the covers of the boxes containing
them, but this was intending to
mount them. but on farther re
flection this was likewise postponed
there being no way of keeping them
dry if mounted.. A large pole
intended to be raised as a flag pole
on the ground has been hauled
upon the ground but is not yet raised.
Received two letters from [O D?] Carlisle
during the forenoon part of the week.
both of which I have answered. also one
from Nell yesterday morning which I
also answered.. Chester Calvin
returned to camp last night..
although his furlough is not yet out
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 37

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

36
The Capt enlisted a new man
yesterday morning who was duly sworn
in and uniformed.. and this morning
he received a furlough. and went home.
Joseph. Springer took a french fur
lough a day or two ago.. and this mor
ning Orderly Sergt Holton was sent
afternoon him and Edward Kill who
is said to be at Marshall.. going under
the name of Edward Kelley..
We have been living very hard
for several days past until this
morning it became so bad that we
could stand it no longer..

Camp Kellogg. Sunday Nov.. 23.
Just after writing the above, yesterday
I heard Sergt Cook crying “twelve men
wanted to go to the railroad to unload cars”
and feeling as though a little exercise
would do me good I closed my book
and went with him..
We found four trucks. loaded with
carriages. caissons. and other parapher
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 38

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

37
nalia belonging to the battery. which
was unloaded..
Now I will commence where I
left off. yesterday. After we ate all
we could get yesterday morning we came
back to camp and entered a complaint
before Capt Walker against those
who furnished us food. and after listen
ing to our complaint. he promised to
see what could be done to better our
condition.. and accordingly took such
steps as he considered the most efficient
to bring about this result.. Of course
it would take some time to make any
change that could be seen.. but our
dinner was some better than we
had for some days previous..
After we got through work at the
Depot we went to the table to get our sup
per but found nothing but bread.
butter and cold water which we could
get.. and thinking that we deserved some
thing better we refused to accept it.
and consequently went to camp and
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 39

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

38
complained again to the Capt. who
sent us to the Sutlers where we got a
good supper which we did as good justice
to as hungry men knew how to..
To day Col. Algiers gave orders
that no one should be allowed to
leave camp during the day either in
squads or on passes. so we are compel
led to remain in camp all day..
A few minutes ago. Ogden Patten
from Buchanan came into camp and
staid awhile.. He did not bring much
news that we had not already heard
He intends staying in the city some
time if he can get a situation..
[Pitts?] Walling returned to camp
last evening after an absence of
several weeks. He having been sick
during his absence. He reports Marion
Nicols very nearly dead when he left
him Friday evening.. suffering from
inflammation of the lungs..
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 40

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

39
Camp. Kellogg. Monday Nov. 24. /62
It has been clear and pleasant though
cool this forenoon. and bids fair to continue
the same this afternoon..
Yesterday afternoon Chaplain Greeley
held religious services on the ground. But
as it was very cold and I did not feel very
well I did not attende them..
Capt Walker being officer of the day
yesterday, he was obliged to call out a
patrol guard, and consequently gave
his men the first chance asking them
ed
to volunteer.. He had no sooner express^
his wish to have us go than he was be
set by all to allow each to go..
He chose twenty of those whom he con
sidered as the most reliable ones. and we
left camp about 8. oclock.. and soon
after divided into three squads commanded
by corporals. Crook. Reynolds and Wilcox..
We searched the town pretty thor
oughly capturing but one man. We
then joined forces again and marched
about 1½ miles to “Tommys” a noted place

[End Scan 40]
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 41

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

40.
where we found 18 or twenty men
who had run the guard and whom.
e
we march^d back to camp on the way
meeting a squad under command of
several of the captains the two majors
and others. in fact composed mostly
of commissioned officers.. The prisoners
grumbled and swore a good deal and
threatened an outbreak if it were
attempted to place them in the guard
house: but when they got there they
all went in with very few words..
After keeping them there a while
their officers had them all taken
to the city jail where they still remain.
This morning Sergt E D. Cooke. took.
command of the company and
took us from breakfast to the rail
road depot. when after waiting there
till after noon ten Oclock. we rode
up to the flats on a train loaded with
lumber which we unloaded there
for our new barracks..
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 42

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

41
Today there are two teams en
gaged hauling the army and accoutre
ments to camp for us: They, so far,
consist of Enfield Rifles, Sabres. cartridge
boxes and belts.
New arrangements are also
being made for our cooking which is
to be done by our companies respectively
Gen. P. Peck has been appointed
Company Commissary Sergeant in place
of Erastus D Crocker. absent… and he is
now busy making preparations for the
new move..
We had a very good dinner consisting
of Potatoes beef and pork..
“Dixie” was taken out of jail this
morning where he has been for about
a week..
The furloughs of most of the men
expire today and tomorrow. and we
may now expect to have more lively
times in a few days.
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 43

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

42 Camp Kellogg. Wednesday Nov 26
The weather continues cold. but
as yet dry without any snow..
We do not do anything in the
way of drilling But instead we are.
busy building barracks, and other
new quarters for, the regiment..
Monday afternoon we did not do
anything. But Tuesday some of the
men were busy on the barracks during
the forenoon while others were busy
digging a hole to set a new pole in..
and today the pole was raised.. and this
evening the old flag was flung to the
breezes amid the cheers of the men and
the strains of Star Spangled Banner
performed by the band..
The banner is a very large one being
about twenty feet or more in length
and of appropriate breadth.
Yesterday Col Grey of the 6th
returned to camp and was met at the
depot by his entire regiment excepting
those detailed for guard
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 44

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

42 Camp Kellogg. Wednesday Nov 26
The weather continues cold. but
as yet dry without any snow..
We do not do anything in the
way of drilling But instead we are.
busy building barracks, and other
new quarters for, the regiment..
Monday afternoon we did not do
anything. But Tuesday some of the
men were busy on the barracks during
the forenoon while others were busy
digging a hole to set a new pole in..
and today the pole was raised.. and this
evening the old flag was flung to the
breezes amid the cheers of the men and
the strains of Star Spangled Banner
performed by the band..
The banner is a very large one being
about twenty feet or more in length
and of appropriate breadth.
Yesterday Col Grey of the 6th
returned to camp and was met at the
depot by his entire regiment excepting
those detailed for guard
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 45

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

44 Camp Kellogg. Thursday. Nov. 27. /62
This is Thanksgiving day.. How different
in many respects from Thanksgiving of
last year. in many how like…
The weather today is much like the
same weather of last Thanksgiving.
The same cold windy, snowy day, and
I presume that were I at home I should
find nearly the same muddy roads..
There is not so much snow today as
there was then.. or at least not so much
as there was there.. In these the two days
are much alike.. But in the different
conditions and places which I occupied
then and now occupy. there is a wide
difference.. Then I was at home surrounded
by parents, brother, friends, and all the
conveniences and necessaries of life and
some few of the luxuries.. But today
I am far from home, parents, friends
almost.. with few of the conveniences and
necessaries, and none of the luxuries
of life.

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 46

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

45
Then I was in command of a
small army of human beings try to
learn their young ideas how to shoot..
Now I am among a number of friends
and acquaintances and together we are
under the command of. a certain
set of men who have control of our
persons. liberties. and life almost..
Holding them in their hands to be used
for the welfare of the company country
and to restore to our land it’s former
peace, prosperity and happiness..
May the Being who holds the welfare
of nations and individuals direct
their minds so that they may
never cruelly and uselessly lead us
to throw away our lives..
I witnessed at noon today the
first severely military punishment
I have ever seen.. A man in Co “B”
of the 6th Capt Weber.. has seen fit
for sometime past to set at defiance
all restrictions and authority of his
superior officers. to so great an extent
as to, with good reason claim guard
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 47

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

46
house as his home. But Capt Weber
today concluded to vary the punishment
and accordingly tied him by his thumbs
to the limb of a tree at such a distance
from the ground as to but slightly
touch the ground with his toes.. and of
course bearing the greater part of his weight
on his thumbs.. this seems severe. but
I think it but just, considering the offences
Men are still busy at work on the
barracks and they are beginning to
assume the appearance of buildings..
Our Thanksgiving dinner consisted
of boiled beef, bean soup, and bread.. “good
enough what there was of it and enough of
it unless it was better.”
This forenoon. [illegible in original] Brownell.
Jack Jemmerson. and John Pullen..
went down town on an old pass. and
were not missed until after dinner..
when a sergeant and four men were
sent after them. and Jemmerson and
Pullen have gone to the guard house until
morning.
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 48

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

47
ly
Capt Walker is quite ill today seeming^
threatened with a fever.. The health of th
camp is extraordinary. I went over
to the hospital for some medicine
for Capt Walker. and heard the Surgeon
say that they had but four or five
there at present..
To day the company desks. came
and the one marked “A” was handed over
to Capt Walker.. This virtually settles the
long undecided question of who should
have company “A”.. and although. we deserve
it others have felt equally sure of getting
it..


Camp Kellogg. Sunday. Nov. 30. /62
The Snow storm still continues
and has continued almost without ces
sation since Thursday morning:
It has not been very severe, and
some of the time it has thawed faster
than it fell therefore there is not
much snow on the ground today..
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 49

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

48
Thursday evening at roll call
I received a letter in Nells hand
But being obliged to go to the sinks
I threw it, as I supposed, into my
blouse pocket but on coming back
I put my hand into my pocket
I found it gone. I then instituted
a careful search by moonlight for it
but could not find it.. Then Allen
Park and I borrowed a lantern and
searched the path over again but with
out success..
Next morning I was out before
daylight and searched the park again
but could not find it. I have looked
for it every day since but without
success.
Friday the men continued
to work on the barracks.. In the
morning Capt Walker who had been
complaining for a day or two went
down to the National Hotel..
to remain until he recovered..
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 50

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

49

I visited him during the after
noon and found him some better..
Edwin Dumphrey was also quite
unwell but remained in the Captains
quarters.. In the evening Orderly
Holton took a squad of twelve of us
down to the Theater.. The play was Uncle
Toms Cabin. which being quite well
performed was quite interesting..
Yesterday all the working force
was ordered out to work on the bar
racks. the kitchens were commenced
and in the afternoon they commen
ced to move the Quartermasters stores..
ed
to the new building.. They finish^
covering the new barracks: and tore down
the Quartermasters building and
removed all that was in it..
Lieut Nichols enlisted a new
man yesterday morning.. named
Charles Hopkins.. George Vosburgh
came in Friday evening bring
ing with him an old French
or Russian soldier. as a new
recruit.
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 51

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

50
Today we have had a perfect
uproar in the barracks all day..
Some went to town to church. but
the majority of those who remained
in camp have been on a regular
“tear” On Friday evening I received
an interesting letter from Irenus
McGowan who is in or near. Nashville
Tennessee. Allen Park also received
one from John Sparks. who said that
his leg was covered with more sores
than when we were home.. and
which still kept him down.. Poor
fellow. how much he has suffered..
and will yet suffer before he
gets up again
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 52

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

51
1862
Camp Kellogg. Wednesday Dec. 3
The weather Since Sunday has continued
wintry and everything seems to say that
winter has fairly set in.. It occasionally
thaws some during the middle of the day
but every night it snows again so that
it remains about as deep as ever..
Monday they continued to work on
the barracks: Sunday after noon after
the services were over the ladies from
the city presented each soldier they
could find with a Testament..
I did not happen to be out and
so failed to get one.. Sunday evening
twenty six of us went to meeting at
the M.E. Church across the river..
Monday evening Sergt O.Brien
took a squad of us to the theater.. The
er
play was new. and most of the performs^
were new ones. But it was not very inter
esting after all..
Quartermaster Sergt Chas. O. Pratt
was promoted to regimental Commis
sary Sergt.
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 53

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

52
Seageant E O. Cook was promoted
by Capt Walker to fill the vacancy
thus made in the company. and there
fore causing another vacancy in
the Sergeantcies in the company
which must be filled either by
promotion by regular grade or by assign
ment by Col Mann..
Yesterday was a very cold day and
during the night. it commenced to
snow again.. I helped the Orderly
about making out the pay rolls
of the company as we are in hopes
to get one months pay this week..
Last evening Lieut Briggs re
turned bringing with him a
new recruit.. He came into
camp this morning..
Richardson and Milliman
also returned last evening..

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 54

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

53
Camp Kellogg. Monday
December. 8th /62
Since writing last Wednesday
we have been too busy most of the
time to allow of my writing..
Wednesday night I was quite
sick with a severe cold. and.
Thursday I continued too un
well to do much..
Thursday Gov. Blair with
several other notables whom I
did not know. He reviewed the
6th regiment and told them that
they must leave for Washington
this week. but that he was sorry
they could not be paid before
they left.. Some swore they would
not go unless they were paid..
Friday morning C.E. Greble of
Battle Creek came here and I
had a good visit with him.. He is
going to raise a company for the 8th
cavalry now stationed at Mount
Clemens
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 55

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

54
Friday afternoon we moved
into our new barracks. and
at first we thought they were
worse than the old ones. and
there was a great deal of grum
bling. But Col Mann heard it
Saturday morning and after
talking to them awhile and tell
ing them to be patient. and he
would make them more comfort
able. he called for some volunteer
carpenters. from each company
he set them to work and the rest of
us to drilling: The morning
was very cold and disagreeable..
In the afternoon the Col. ordered
a floor laid in the barracks which
made them a great deal more comfort
able.. Sunday was very cold and
stormy a part of the day..
One of the clergymen of the city
delivered a farewell sermon to the
6th regiment of which I heard a
part..
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 56

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

55

Saturday morning the Orderly
divided the company into squads
according to the size of the men
and assigning a Sergt and two
corporals to each division:
There being but two seven corpo
rals I only got one with me.
Although it seperates many who
had been in the habit of bunking
together there is but little grum
bling among the men..
Today has been some warmer
than some of the preceding ones..
This morning we were all ordered
out for drill. and at noon. Col
Mann ordered a box of rifles opened
and the noncommisioned. officers
to learn the manual of arms
which is to be taught, by a Lieut in
Capt Armstrong’s company whose
name I do not as yet know..
We are to drill with them. from
9. to 10 A.M. and from 1 to. 2. P.M.
and with the men from 10. to 12. and
2 to 4.

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 57

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

56
Camp Kellogg. Thursday
December 11th /62
We have been quite busy during
the past four days: so much so that
I have almost forgotten what day
of the week this is..
Tuesday the 6th commenced
moving.. and tore up their tents
and moved there to the cars
by night so that by night there
was not a tent. nor anything for
shelter under which the men
could sleep. They built up fires
burning everything they could
lay hands on. and large bonfires
were kept up all night. Yesterday
morning however no men were
on the ground. One company of
horses left in the morning..
Everything looks lonesome since
they left.. Tuesday night forty
germans for the battery arrived
here. fine looking fellows they are too..
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 58

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

57

Yesterday morning they
were set at work and mounted
the four steel guns that were
ground and worked all the fore
noon getting the guns and caissons
into position where they now
stand with two of the men on
guard over them..
Tuesday evening after the
6th was all broken up it was
found necessary to form an
almost entire new guard..
with offices and officer of the day
Lieut Boughton of Co B. was
appointed Officer of Day, and Sergt
Luomis of Co A” Officer of Guard.
Yesterday morning we had
the first Guard mounting of
the 7th with Lieut Sproles of Co ‘E’
officer of day and Sergt E.O. Lang
Officer of Guard with Sergt Fisher
of Co ‘E’ and myself as Sergeants
of the guard.
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 59

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

58
We had drill in companies
and noncommissioned officers
in manual of arms Tuesday but
in neither yesterday. Every man
in camp was detailed for guard
and to work tearing down old
buildings and building a guard
house yesterday.. and they still
continue working on them today
Some of the boys emboldened
by their success of Sunday
evening supplied our table yester
day with a load of chickens.
The old proverb says that stolen
fruit tastes sweetest. I do not
know as this is so. But I do know
that chickens never tasted better
than they have this week..
Lieut Briggs went to Detroit
on very urgent business. yesterday
morning. when he will return
we do not know..
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 60

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

59
Col. Mann also went away
yesterday morning and will
be gone about two weeks.. Col.
Litchfield is also absent. and
the regiment is under com
mand of our Major whose
name I do not know.
The opinion is quite prevalent
among our officers that we
will leave here within the next
six weeks. Col Mann was
heard to tell Lieut Briggs
that we would be away from
here by the 25th of this month..
We can not hardly beleive
this as there cannot be over
six hundred men now on the
ground. He says. that he has al
ready 900 men enlisted and the
remainder will be ready by New Years
Our horses are all contracted to
be here by th 29th of the month..
and if they are got here we shall
leave soon after
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 61

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

60
Camp Kellogg, Tuesday Dec.. 16 /62
like
This looks very much ^ winter again
It commenced snowing during the
latter part of last night and this
morning the ground was white
again. Previous to this time it had
been quite good weather for several
days: I did not do much during
the latter part of the week. The ground
was muddy so that our drill in the
Manual of arms was postponed. [illegible in original]
except about half an hour Saturday
morning: Saturday afternoon
I was detailed to take charge of a
squad of men to pile up lumber
and otherwise clean up the campground:
Satuday evening I took charge
of a squad of ten of our boys. to,
go to the theater; The bringing
of the squad secured me a free ticket
to admittance: The play was the
“Lady of Lyons” and proved the
most entertaining one I have
yet seen:
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 62

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

61

Sunday Major Houston. procured
the services of the Rev. Mr Smith of the
ed
Congregational church of this city who address^
us at 3 Oclock in the afternoon, Quite
a number of ladies and gentleman
from the city visited us notwithstanding
the dampness of the day: After the services
were ended we marche to the old parade
ground of the 6th where we went through
the form of a “Dress parade.” which
from the ignorance of our Adjutant and
Major was quite a laughable affair..
Our Adjutant is a really fine
fellow and one of the best educated men
of the state. but is entirely ignorant
of military matters. and especially of
drill.. Saturday night I received a
letter from Nell, containing half a
sheet of paper and a dozen postage stamps
I answered on Sunday; Friday
afternoon I received a letter from
Rene: which I answered on Saturday.
I received a letter from W.H. Curtis
Sunday afternoon.

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 64

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

63

Sunday evening I received orders
from our Sergeant Major to report next
morning for duty as “Officer of the Guard..
It was a post I did not crave in the
least: But seeing no way to get out of it I
did as ordered: Etiquette demanding that
I should wear a sword and having none of
my own I borrowed an old one of Captain
Armstrong: But Major Houston seeing
the predicament we were placed in ordered
that each Sergt should be supplied with
a sabre and trappings which was accord
ingly done: and about ten Oclock I was
sporting one of my own. which suited
me much better than the old one I
had before: I placed one poor old fellow
in the Guard House: whose offence was get
ting drunk and outstaying the time allowed
by the pass given him Sunday:
The report was just circulated in the
barracks just now that 25 horses for
our regiment had arrived in the city
I sincerely hope this is not so: for
if they begin to come in now it will
deprive some from going home next week..
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 65

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

64
Camp Kellogg Wednesday
December 17th 1862
Day clear and cold. though thaw
ing slightly during the middle of
the day. At dinner roll call. the
Sergeants were ordered to assemble
at the drill house with sabres
to receive a lesson: at half past
one: We were all there promptly
at the time appointed. But were
informed by Col Litchfield that
the meeting was intended only
for commissioned officers. But
since we had all come we might
all stay: The lesson, consisted
only of the primary steps. draw.
carry. present and return Sabre.
intended only to help the com
missioned officers on Dress
Parade. A lesson containing in
structions for the forming
and arranging the different
squadrons on parade was also
given the officers.
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 66

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

65

We had parade as usual
at half past three oclock P.M.
[headed?] by Col. Litchfield who
conducted it in a somewhat
different manner from that in
which Major Houston conducted it..
An order was read on parade
reducing Sergeant Robert [Cobert?]
of the battery to the ranks for disobe
dience to orders. using disrespectful
language to a superior Officer and
for insubordination.. this is too bad
as he is really a fine, intelligent looking
fellow. and is well educated..
He is the best swordsman I ever
saw.. But is rather a hard [pet?] if we are
to beleive the reports of his Orderly
Sergeant who seems to be jealous of
him. and who seems to be one who
seems to make a good deal of the
little authority given him: The bat
tery men drill at their guns during
the day. each day:
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 67

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

66
Today quite a number of horses
came on the ground were inspected
by Capt Botham Warner and most
of them inspec accepted and branded
A number of men from each company
were detailed from to night to take
care of them: Although I was
not detailed I went with them wanting
to see the horses. many of which are
very good. I rode one of them to
the river to water them. Ninety
More are expected in the city to night
Some one reports that Col Litchfield
said that the first battalion of
our regiment would leave here a
week from tomorrow. This must
be false for it seems impossible
that we shall leave in the condition
we now are:
But here is a letter from
Nell and I will write no more
to night..
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 68

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

67

Camp Kellogg. Thursday
December 18, 1862..
The day has been clear windy
and quite cold.. It thawed some during
the middle of the day.. but the snow
does not go off very fast.. This morning
Col Mann returned to camp
and the first intimation I had
of his return was the order to fall
out for drill.. which it was said
came from him.. Some of the other
companies went out with quite a
squad of men in each.. But after call
ing through the barracks. and over the
ground for our company we got together
one Lieutenant. four Sergeants. and as
many privates: After fooling around
awhile Lieut Briggs ordered us
to fall in right dress. right face. break
ranks. march which evolutions were
performed with more of a “vim” than is
customary for our company.. and we
then gave three cheers for Lieut Briggs
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 69

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

68
At eleven Oclock the noncommis
sioned officers were ordered out for
drill in the manual of arms. which drill
lasted about an hour.. We drilled in the
new drill room..
At three O.clock the Orderlys and
commissary sergeants were ordered to meet
at the drill room. to receive some instructions
from Col Mann.. What these instructions
were we have not yet learned..
Our drill Dress Parade instead of
being at half past 3.Oclock was post
poned until after four Oclock
Col Mann acted as Adjutant
in forming the parade: but it was
presided over by Lieut Col Litchfield..
An order was read Assigning
Capt [N?] Moore or Enmore to the
commanding of Co “E” and to the
insruction of the guards in the
manual of arms and in their duties
as guards.. The ordered was headed
Lee. Barracks. But whether the camp
is to be known by this name or not is
not known, to many at least..
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 70

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

69
Horses still continue to come in:
About 30. more were accepted today,
as good ones as their predecessors of yesterday
The barracks still progress each day
slowly ‘tis true, but yet surely. Part of a
new company have come in quietly. within
the past two or three days. They number
some twenty or twenty five men. but. whose
they are or where they belong. or came from
no one knows..
Many rumors are afloat in camp since
Col Mann’s return. some to full of untruth
and unreasonableness to be for a moment
credited: But there are two which are
readily received and beleived by many who
are the best informed among us..
They are that no more furloughs
will be granted. and that we will leave
here by the first of January:
Many of the boys will be sadly disap
pointed and some will doubtless take
furloughs of their own. even at the risk
of severe punishment

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 71

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

70
But to those
who love law and order
there seems no remedy but to “grin and
bear it..” Many of us have no reason to
grumble without furloughs. as some have
had as many as five furloughs:
Burlingham returned last evening
and Streeter tonight..
Capt Walker went to Detroit yesterday
morning. with Luke to have him mustered.
He may go to Niles before he returns to
camp again.
Some men have been in camp today
wanting to advance the men a months
pay. at [illegible in original]. Some of the com
panies are selling but as yet no move
has been made in our company..
The noncommissioned officers who
had received rifles. were ordered to return
them to the quarters of. Lieut Littlefield
with the intention of having them
issued to the men in the different
companies tomorrow.. This begins to
look a little like work..

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 72

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

71
Lee Barracks. Friday
December 19. 1862
Day clear, sunshiny and cold.. This
morning we were ordered to attend
Sergeants drill mounted..
We each went to the stable and
chose a horse: By the way we were
furnished with only a watering
bridle and blanket.. no saddles are
to be allowed us ‘till we have
first learned to write ride without
them:
Lieut Col Litchfield superin
tended the drill which consisted
only of instructions concerning
the position of sitting a horse
manner of holding the reins. mounting
and dismounting: We had mounted
at the stables, from stumps and
everything convenient.. But when it
came to mounting from the ground
some of us found it no easy matter.
My horse was young and firey
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 73

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

72

and I had no surcingle so that
when I leaped upon his back he humped
rolled
sideways. the blanket ^ and although
not thrown I did not succeed in moun
ting him: The Col seeing my fix,
at length. came to me and assisted
me to mount him: and also another
one who was as slow as myself..
One poor fellow (of Co. B. I think)
was unhorsed while trotting and
his horse ran away to the stables:
The Col laughed and told him
he could be excused. The companies
were out on drill both forenoon. and
fore afternoon. The drill is very
simple. Col Mann doing away with
all of the complicated movements
and doing nothing but facings
and position of the soldier..
Horses continue to come in today
as usual. Two droves. of perhaps thirty
in each came in today: as good or
better ones than the preceding ones:
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 74

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863


73

They are to be divided into
lots. and each company to take
care of a just proportion of them..
The perplexing question con
cerning furloughs seems to be decided
and every one seems to beleive there will
be no more grumbled. granted. at least
to those who have already had one or
e r
more: I h^a^d. our Quartermaster this
morning say that Cols Mann and Litch
field were quite confident that our regi
ment would be full by the first of
January, and that he wanted the horses
all sent in by that time:
We drew our cross sabres and letters
for, our, caps this afternoon:
An order was read on parade
tonight. giving this camp the name
of Lee Barracks hereafter..
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 75

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

74

Lee Barracks Monday
December 22nd 1862. 1. A.M.
This is rather an unusual and perhaps
unseasonable time for me to take my pen
to write here. But I am obliged to keep
awake. and having everything handy I
drive along:
The weather still continues about
the same as usual.. Yesterday was clear
sunny. windy and very cold. Volunteered
in the morning to assist in taking
care of horses. and groomed and fed one
in the morning. and at night noon
and watered him at morning and
night.. The one I had chosen on Friday
had been taken from among our lot
and I was obliged to choose another
in which I was quite successful..
During the forenoon the rifles
were issued to the company. each one
being also supplied. with a cork stop
[per?] for his rifle and those who were
taking care of the horses with blanket
surcingle. watering bridle.
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 76

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

75

curry comb and brush: About three
O’clock. P.M. Sergt E.S. Lang who
was Officer of the guard came to me and
asked if I would do an errand for Col
Mann. which I was but too ready to do.
He then gave me a message from Col
Mann to some one in Detroit which I car
ried to the Telegraph office and had sent
off and waited until an answer to the
same was received which I brought back
and handed to our Adjutant in the
absence of Col Mann. I had procured
a pass from Lieut Briggs sometime before
for myself and ten men. and think
ing this a good chance I asked the
Adjutant if he would sign it which
he did readily..
Eight men went with me to the
theater which was very good.. The play
was. The Drunkard. and was quite inter
esting: The farce was entitled A
Husband at sight: and was quite laugh
able
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 77

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

76
When I got back to camp I found
two letters for me. one from Mother. the
other from Nell. Nells, contained five
dollars sent for the purpose of enabling
me to get home to spend Christmas
and New Years. But I can not go..
This, or yesterday morning I was detailed
at the last moment to act as sergt of the guard..
The day was [lowry?], cold, very cold in the
morning but growing milder towards noon
and a fine, drizzling rain setting in. but
which did not last long: still it continued
warmer all of the day. and tonight it is
quite comfortable.. We have just come in from
the “Grand Rounds.” on which we found
our sentries all alert and stirring and
failed to get the countersign away from
any one. I have been very busy writing
all night: having answered both Mothers
and Nells letters covering 12 twelve pages
of largest sized letter paper to write them..
But a few horses came in on Sat
urday, not more than twelve or fifteen
I think..
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 78

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

77

Today the regimental blacksmith
Sergt Major. Quartermaster Sergt and another
went riding to try some of our horses:
Sometime during the afternoon the
blacksmith mounted a horse which ran
away and threw him off. then ran
down town where he was caught. and
a young man mounted him to ride back
to camp when he ran away threw him
off and broke his leg twice: and laming
the horse badly..
Services were to be held at 3 P.M.
in the drill room I do not know whether
there was any preaching or not.. I went
in after awhile and found Col Litch
field reading the army regulations to
those assembled there.
I shall try hard for a furlough
tomorrow, but with poor prospects of
success. But I can only fail by
trying. Barber, Springer, McNiel
and Allen received furloughs today
and went out tonight

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 79

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

78
Lee Barracks
Friday December 26th 1862
The weather this week has been variable
and unpleasant.. Sunshine and storm..
storm and sunshine: mud and snow
and then mud again: I am now writing
where I wrote the last preceding pages: but
at an hour somewhat earlier in the evening
It is now nine O’clocks the time when horses &
folke are generally found in bed. but I am
doomed to remain up for three or four hours
yet. and perhaps all night: I am acting as
Officer of the guard. tonight..
Monday morning about seven O’clock
to
I went ^ the barracks and slept till about ten
O’clock when I was awakened by the cry
of “Sergeants of Co ‘A’ fall in for drill”
But not thinking myself compelled to
do so I did not “fall in:” At noon I
went with the company to take care
of the horses. and afterwards attended
Sergts drill in the Manual of arms
which was conducted by Major
Newcombe..
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 80

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

79


Monday was quite warm
and the snow nearly all melted away
and on Tuesday there was but little
left.. In the forenoon of Tuesday the
Sergts corporals and twenty men of each
company were ordered out to drill on horse
back. In the afternoon such of the company
as were not on drill other duty were got out
to drill in the manual of arms. and were
taken charge of by Sergt Richardson while
Sergts Holton and myself went to the
drill room thinking there was to be a Sergts
drill: but after waiting there about an
we found that the drill was postponed
and that at three O’clock there was
a meeting of the first Quartermaster
and Commissary Sergts of each company
at which meeting Col Mann gave
them some instructions in regard to the
manner of doing their business:
As I was writing there I could
hear their instructions which were
quite instructive
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 81

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

80


Col Mann likes to have everything
done up in good order and will have
it done just so or not at all: and he has
an eye like an eagle and nothing escapes
him: Horses continue to come in by
lots each day:
Wednesday was quite warm
and pleasant: The same number drilled
during the forenoon. while a few more were
on police duty at the stables. grading the
stalls and digging trenches to lead the water
away from them. In the afternoon all of
the company was detailed for the purpose:
Tuesday evening I went with a squad of
men under Cap Reynolds to the theater
The play was Hamlet Mr [illegible in original]
acting as Hamlet. Jesse McFarland
danced a highland fling in real
Scotch costume. and drew down the
cheers. from the house. and after being
loudly called for came out the second time.
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 82

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

81

Thursday was Christmas although
it was widely different from any I ever
passed before. We were sent to work at the
stables after watering our horses: but for
some reason most of the company returned
to the quarters. and but three or four were
to be found to work there: The forage master
wanting all the halters that could be found
[illegible in original] Graham and myself went to work
opening boxes containing them.. We opened
ten boxes and took from them fifty halters
surcingles. watering bridles. curry combs
and brushes: Several horses came in
during the day: more than on any other
day since we commenced receiving them..
We now have upwards of sixty horses
assigned to our company..
The weather yesterday was warm. and
dry. and the ground began to feel solid
again. but during the evening it commen
ced raining and this morning it was
raining and has continued to rain
up to a few moments ago. when it cleared
up and bids fair to be pleasant again
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 84

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

83

Corporal Graham went over to the
hospital this afternoon. and found the
boys quite down: Alex. Lowry is very
poorly and I should not be surprised
did he not live a month poor fellow
I wish he might go home.
Chester Calvin is also quite
unwell. I think these two are all
of our boys now there..
Sergt E.D. Cook returned to
camp to night bringing with him
some new recruits: who will be gladly
welcomed by every one.
Tuesday evening a new company
of forty men arrived in the city. and
in camp Wednesday morning being
met every where by three hearty cheers..
They drew their Clothing and received
furloughs [util?] January 3d
On Wednesday night another com
pany arrived with thirteen men, and
came into camp Christmas morn
ing.. I received a letter from Isom
and Melinda this morning and
have answered it to night
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 85

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

84
Wednesday afternoon Newton Sparks
and Freeman Howe obtained furloughs and
started for home. After they had been gone
a little while the Col. found that he had furloughed
a bugler and was very angry and ordered him
sent for. But no steps were taken to get him:
This morning as it was very rainy and I
considered it dangerous to be out much with
out something to protect me I drew my ‘Poncho”
blanket which helps to keep one dry amazingly:

Lee Barracks. Sunday Eve
December 28th /62
The weather has improved amazingly since
Friday night. Yesterday was clear and cold
and the mud dried very fast so that it is
much more pleasant getting around on
the camp ground than it was Friday..
Yesterday all those who came off
guard in the morning were allowed
passes to go to the city. and as I had
been in camp three or four weeks
without a pass I was quite glad
to get one:
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 86

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

85

Having received information
Friday that Alex Lowrie had received
notice from P.N. Taylor Esq that he
could get his back pay for him if he
would sign a power of attorney for him.
I went to the hospital and saw
Alex and found a power of Atty already
made out requiring only his signature
and acknowledgment before a notary
public to make it all right.. I knew that
he was too unwell to attend to the business
for himself. so I found a Notary Public
and got him to go with me to the hos
pital and there receive the acknowledgement
I then procured the Seal of the County
Clerk upon it and mailed it to Mr Taylor.
Alex is very low and I think
I never saw but one person that looked
worse than he does.. At the evening
mail a large document was handed
me directed to Alex: and bearing
the mark of O W Howard upon it.
Mistrusting that this was some
thing relating. also to this business
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 87

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

86
I lost no time in conveying it to
him. and found it to contain two papers
relating to the matter and which signed
by him would secure his final discharge
from the 12th regiment and back pay on
that discharge. and also a note from
Mr Howard desiring to know what right
Mr P.N. Taylor had to draw this money.
I sat down immediately and wrote
an answer for “Alick” telling him
the nature of the business between him
and Taylor.. “Alick” also signed the
papers. and desired Mr Howard to
send the money on directly without
waiting to hear from Taylor.. and I mailed
the letter immediately.. Corporal Adams
and Pitts Walling ran the guard
last night and I a patrol was sent
out and they were caught and put into
the guard house where at sundown today
ly
they still remain: Adams must certain^
lose his position now. and ought to have
done so long ago..
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 88

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

87

Today has been clear and pleasant..
It was quite cold this morning but was
warmer during the middle of the day
and until night. this forenoon at
eleven O’clock we had our first inspec
tion. We were obliged to have our bunks
made up in proper order our boots cleaned
and blacked. our clothes properly brushed
and mended. our Jackets on. and in
line with our rifles in tip top order and
with us. Our guns were first inspected
and after that was over we marched to
the quarters and each took his post opposite
his bunk, and stood with caps off.
and arms shouldered while our bunks
were inspected.. The inspection was made
by the commanders of the companies:
At half past three O’clock this after
noon religious services were held in the
reading room by the Rev Mr Smith of
the congregational church.. of this
city.. He also contributed quite an
amount of reading matter to our
collection in the reading room.
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 89

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

88
At half past four O’clock we had
a “Dress Parade” each man appearing
with his gun for the first time:
A good many of the citizens
were out to visit us.. and attend the
religious services..
Our reading room is quite an
institution. and a large assortment
of reading matter: is now on hand.
We do not get much time however
to be here. and the greater part of the
time I have to spend here I spend in
writing: Our brass band which has
a week past
been gone.. ^ returned to camp this
morning and assisted at Guard
mounting and Dress Parade this
afternoon:
Sergt Loomis returned to
camp last night and I was glad
to see him as we need all of our
Sergts here now. Marcott also returned.
Sergt E.D. Cook went with his
recruits to Detroit to have them
mustered. when he will again
return to Niles.
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 90

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863


89

Lee Barracks Tuesday
Morning Dec. 30, 62
[illegible in original] I have just come off Guard again
having been detailed as Sergt of the guard
yesterday morning. and together with
Sergt Loomis as Officer of the Guard we
ran the institution “manfully:
the day was quite cool but clear and
pleasant. We found three or four prisoners
in confinement and soon after upon
complaint of Lieut Holmes I arrested
and confined there Private Hill of
Co “E..” Soon after Sergt E. P Lang..
brought there Chas Malcolmb of Co ‘A’
and requested us to confine him..
But as we had received no order
from Lieut Brigg we could not do,
so: It was not long however
before the order was forthcoming.
and he soon found himself an
inmate of the large cell.. His offence
was abusive language to Sergt Holton
and also striking Sergt Richardson..
It will very likely go hard with him

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 91

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

90

The remainder of the day went
on quite pleasantly and quietly..
Dress Parade came off at three O’clock
and was quite a splendid thing..
An Order was read from Lieut
Col Litchfield. reducing Corporal
Adams of our Company to the ranks..
This is perfectly just and right.
During the evening Sergt Holton
requested him to remove his stripes.
But he refused to do so, also using
abusive language towards him.. and
he soon after found himself again an
inmate of the Guard house and in com
pany with his Kindred spirits..
The countersign “Quebec” had scarcely
been given to the third releif. before three
or four privates went out with it. which
was soon reported to the Officer of the Guard
who also informed the Officer of the day.
and the countersign was changed to
“Montreal” and orders given to the sentries
to allow no man to pass them. with either
countersign except at the Sally Port”
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 92

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

91

It was not long until Barney a
bugler of Co. “T together with a private
of the same Co” were “bagged” but after
consultation between the Officers of Day
and Guard with the officers of Co “B”
they were sent to their quarters..
Soon after it was reported that two
men had run the guard near the head
quarters. and a Sergt and corporal and
private were sent after them. They returned
however without capturing them.. But
in a little while two boys from Co B.
appeard at the Sally Port and requested
admittance: They stated that they had
gone to the city on a pass with two others
who had gone off and left them: while
they being tired returned without them:
They were brought in to the Officer’s
room and Sergt Loomis after questioning
them awhile proceded to take their names
when one of them refused to give his name
and said he preferred going into the next
room: to waiting until being reported this
morning..
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 93

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

92

They then confessed that they
were the two who had run the guard
a few moments before: This was a little
the richest “note” of the season and we
enjoyed “hugely” their discomfiture..
They were soon lodged with the
others.. A squad of Patrols from the
Battery came in about 9 Oclock
bringing with them Private [Barn?]-
miller of their company who was also
lodged in the cell with the others..
We now had eleven prisoners in
one room about ten feet square.. They
were well supplied with blankets
each one having his overcoat and as
many blankets as were therefore quite
comfortable as it was not our orders nor
our desires to have them suffer with cold..
They were quiet and orderly and occasioned
but little trouble until towards morning
when some one took out the window
and Hill of Co “E” watching his chance
when the sentry’s attention was called
another way leaped from the window
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 94

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

93

and ran as if for dear life to his quarters.
But he was not destined to enjoy his
freedom thus gained for a long time..
A Corporal soon disturbed him
and he was lodged in one of the dark
cells as a reward for his impatience and
audacity.. A few ran the guard without
being caught by the Patrols.. Several horses
were sick during the night.. The night was
clear and moonlight making it [very?] pleas
ant and sleep almost impossible.. I slept
however during the two hours of intervening
between the changing of the releifs until
after three O’clock when I awoke our
other Sergt who releived me.: after that
I crawled into my bunk and slept very
well until Guard mounting this morning
The day is somewhat colder than
yesterday and the ground is dry and
hard. A good many horses are being
brought in to day. But dinner is
ready and I must go:
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 95

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

94
Lee Barracks. Friday
January 2d 1863..
Just off guard again. So goes
it at present with we poor Sergts.
I had anticipated that I would
come on guard about New Years again.
Yesterday morning however I
was not detailed and thought I had
escaped. But no! our imbecile or
drunken Sergt. Major did not get out
a sufficient number of sergeants Co
E not furnishing one as ordered so Co ‘A’
had to take it again. It fell upon Loomis
or myself and as Loomis was detailed
to command those tending to the horses
I was the unlucky one: The order was
given to Sergt Holton during the
forenoon: but I being away watering
horses did not receive it until nearly
three Oclock in the afternoon, and
saying some hard things. and think
ing some harder ones I buckled on
my old “Cheese Knife” and reported
myself at the old [Stand?]
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 96

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

95

Things went off quite smoothly
during the day and night.. We had
but two prisoners “Dixie” and a
German belonging to the Battery:
Another one from Co ‘E’ was placed
there during the afternoon. having been
brought up from the city drunk.
Lieut Holmes ordered his release
towards evening. and he was accordingly
dismissed:
The weather since Tuesday has
been very pleasant and agreeable. until
yesterday evening when it commenced
raining and has rained constantly ever
since. Instead of taking a pass during
the day Tuesday as I was entitled to
I concluded to wait and go to the city
during the evening: consequently I went
on duty.. taking care of the horses during
the day. drilling in the afternoon and
going on dress parade. none of which
I was obliged to do. I helped water
the horses at night likewise
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 97

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

96

Major Newcombe ordered all of
the officers and sergeants to appear
at the drill room at 7½ O’clock in
the evening to drill in the manual
of arms. and thinking I would be
benefited more by attending that, than
by going to the city. I shouldered.
my rifle and was there some time
before the appointed time: We had a
good drill and I did not regret
that I had staid..
Major Newcombe is a fine officer..
kind and obliging. having the faculty of
explaining the drill to the understanding
of all. slightly drawn back by an impedi
ment in his speech.. making it harder
for him to explain than for us to under
stand..
I received a letter from Nell that
evening. and it was most gladly welcomed
as I had expected it for several days. and
also from the fact that it contained a
dozen of Postage Stamps.
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 98

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

97

Wednesday was a clear pleasant time
day.: the usual stable duties were performed.
a drill in the manual of arms by compa
nies was held in the forenoon: and a battal
ion drill in the afternoon consisting
simply of manual of arms as far as
parade rest. and in marching by fours.
and wheeling into line.. Dress parade
at 3 O’clock.. when orders were read
Lovell
reducing Corporals [illegible in original] and [Stearnes?] of
Co “B” to the ranks for running the guard
and sentencing them to six days extra
guard duty: also privates Hill of Co “E”
Malcolm of Co “A.” Springer of Co “B”
and Van Pelt of the same.. Walling of Co
“A” and [illegible in original] of the battery to the
same. for various offences and un
soldierly conduct.. This goes pretty
hard: But Col Mann is determined
to have discipline to punish every
offender according to his guilt. while
at the same time he encourages noble
and soldierly conduct. and gives men
all the privileges that they should ask
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 99

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

98
While the companies were at sup
per Wednesday evening Col Mann
visited the eating houses and told the
men. that it being New Years Eve he
should allow them all privileges that he
consistently could.. They would be allowed
to go to the theater in Squads under charge
of a responsible persons the Sutler would
be allowed to keep open his shop and they
in camp
should enjoy themselves ^ as they saw fit until
one Oclock at the same time conducting
themselves as soldiers and gentlemen..
Not knowing how to spend the time
Richardson invited me into his room. to
take a few games of Euchre with him..
and of course I accepted it..
During the fore part of the
evening we heard squads of men marching over
the camp apparently under charge of some
ex extempore commander.. and cheering
and laughing. But we did not know
the cause or object.. But about nine
O’clock a knock came at our door
and upon challenging the answer
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 100

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

99

was “a friend”.. The door was opened
and Sergt OBrien appeared and told
Richardson that a friend from Niles
wished to speak with him.. He was
accordingly told to bring him for
ward. and first one. then another and
another came forward seizing him
by leg and arms and endeavoring to
carry him away by force. He accordingly
resisted and quite a skirmish ensued
which resulted in finally carrying
him away with them.. I did not
follow but patiently awaited his
return, in the meantime repairing
the stove pipe which had been disjointed
during the scuffle.. Soon however there
came another knock at the door..
I politely invited them in. when
OBrien and Crook appeared and
requested me to accompany them..
Knowing it to be vain to attempt
resistance against such odds I ac
cordingly surrendered and marched
away with them and soon found
myself at the Sutlers where each

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 101

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

100
took something to eat or drink
at my expense.. After they had
served me so. they marched to the
Capt Quarters after Sergt Holton..
But not finding him Lieut Briggs
voluntarily came back wth them
and treated one and all.. next was Billy
OBrien’s turn. then Crooks. then
Will Graham’s then Harvey Reynolds
who gave us quite a tussel but who treated
like a man.. These together with Loomis
and [Lang?] who had served their turns
before were all then in camp..
About Eleven O’clock Anthony came
in and the boys made him “wet his stripes”
also.. Sergt Holton. Pratt and
Milliman were postponed for the mor
row.. Other companies did the same
by their “non commish” and some of them
demanded the same from Douglas. and
an incredible amount of cakes, pies, cigars,
apples, tobacco, cider, [illegible in original] and candy
were eaten in those five hours
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 102

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

101

At twelve O’clock the battery
wheeled their guns out on the knoll
west of the camp and fired a salute
of thirty four guns. the first notes
uttered by our little Bull Dogs..
An order had been given by
Major Newcombe that officers and
Sergts should meet to drill at seven
O’clock. which order was finally counter
manded..
Yesterday but little drilling
was done. Many of the men being
busy all of the forenoon watering
horses. while the remainder were busy
policing and cleaning the grounds. which
at Dress Parade presented a clean
neat. and beautiful appearance:
About time for Dress Parade
a four horse carriage containing
Col. Mann and several other gentle
men came into camp.. and Col Mann
was quite attentive showing them
everything from kitchen to head
quarters..
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 103

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

102

During the Parade the battery
again fired a salute of two guns.
A horse attached to a buggy con
taining a gentleman and two ladies took
fright and ran across the camp until
just outside the lines where it was checked
for a few minutes.. after a while it started
again. and when again stopped the
man got out and took it by the head
when it jumped sideways breaking
one wheel. The ladies then got out when
it started and ran dragging the man.
who held it by the bits. about twenty rods
when he stopped it again and finally
managed to get it away from the buggy..
On the Grand Rounds last night
an old man, a private of one of the com
panies who accompanied us ran nearly
every beat greatly amusing the Officer of
the day and making the guards very
angry: because they could not stop him.
No trouble about the countersign being
used last night. It was Antietam and
very few men could pronounce it correctly..
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 104

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

103

Horses have been coming in in great
numbers this week.. Day before yesterday
about a hundred came in and about
seventy came in yesterday: Our Company
now has a hundred to take care of..
Four new recruits from Cass County
came in yesteday forenoon.
Corporal Harrison returned to camp
yesterday, or rather last night.. It is
about time, too, that [Barber?] Springer.
McNiel. Allen. Brownell. Howe
Bradley Bonnell. Howe and Newt
Sparks were back.. [Mealoy?] getting
word that his little child was very
sick and he immediately procured
a furlough and went home.. a day or two ago
Tomorrow will be the day for
those new companies to return
to camp again. their furloughs
being out and their presence wanted
here badly..
I received an invitation
yesterday morning to eat dinner
at a private house outside the camp
ground. But was obliged by the press
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 105

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

104

of circumstances to decline. Harvey
Reynolds went and said that he
had not eaten a better dinner for
sometime.. For Supper last night
ed
we had Oysters. and Chickens furnish^
by Lieut Briggs.. They were well cooked
and together with a plenty of crackers
and bread, butter and their chicken fixins
was quite wholesome:
Those who were on guard received.
Oysters for breakfast this morning..
At noon yesterday the boys tried to
get Sergt Holton to go and “wet his
stripes” but he obsinately refused and
even attem threatened to knife any
who laid hands on him to take him
by force.. The boys were exasperated at this
and groaned him. Charley Pratt
was captured but the boys being in a
hurry postponed the treat until night..
Whether they got it then or not I do not
know.. the Sergt Major was captured and
made to treat..
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 106

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

105

Milliman was captured at night and
taken to the [illegible in original]. but absolutely refused
to treate.. Finding that they might as
well try to squeeze milk from a stone
as to squeeze a treat from him.. they
released him and gave him three hearty
groans..
It still, continues to rain and
the camp is already very muddy.. and
as it shows no signs of stopping soon
we shall be knee deep in mud about
the stables and barracks before night
Sergt OBrien is on guard today
and I doubt not that either Loomis
or myself will be on again tomorrow..
There has been a non commissioned
officer from Co “A” this week every
day and nearly every day [two?]..
Monday.. Loomis and myself.. Tuesday. Corp.
Anthony. Wednesday Sergt OBrien and Corp
Graham. Thursday. Corp. Anthony and
myself. Today Lieut OBrien and corp
Graham. and what tomorrow will..
bring forth I dare not anticipate..
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 107

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

106
Lee Barracks. Saturday
January 3d 1863
The weather still continues warm
and springlike.. the rain has ceased
and the mud nearly dried up
again: It is strange. though
exceedingly pleasant and agree
able that the weather should com
tinue so warm and mild:
Nothing of any note has transpired
since yesterday morning. there
fore I have but little to write..
and nothing of interest:
Chester Calvin who has been in
the hospital for some time. returned
to camp discharged, but excused
from duty for duty two days..
I was mistaken in saying that
four recruits came in yesterday
as there was but two. [Spout?] and
Worthen.
I had omitted also to state
that on New Years a new set
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 108

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

107

of dishes consisting of cups
plates and spoons. all bright and
shining: were received
On account of the storms
weather Dress Parade was postponed
both yesterday and today: Ditches have
been dug and the barracks banked
up some making it some warmer
Tonight while watering horses
one just in advance of my camel
kicked. and just missing my horse
hit me quite a blow on. my knee.
It does not as yet hurt me much
but it may be quite lame by morning.
Howe and Luke have just come
in on their furlough and it
is also time that the others were
also coming in.
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 109

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

108
Lee Barracks Monday
January 5th 1863
As usual just, off guard again.
Yesterday morning I was again detailed
as Sergt of the guard. and accordingly
obeyed.. It rained quite hard all the
morning: and the guard was [mouted?] during
quite a heavy shower.. making it neces
sary to have our Ponchos on. which
protect us quite well from the wet.
I found Sergt Thomas of Co [“D”?]
detailed for Officer of the Guard..
and found quite a pleasnt companion
in him. and notwithstanding the stormy
state of the weather. I spent about the
most pleasant tour of guard duty
I have ever performed..
We found seven prisoners in the
guard house. two of them in the
large cell and five in the dark
cell. [illegible in original] of Co [“D”?] and Williams of Co. ‘E’
large
were confined in the ^ cell and were
released during the day..
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 110

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

109

Also during the day Keenan
of Co “D” was confined in the large
cell for refusing to do extra guard
duty imposed upon him for some
misdemeanor and was afterwards
sentenced to confinement on bread and
water diet until he consented to perform
such duty: After learning his sentence
he consented to perform said duty and
was soon released:
Esmond of Co “D”.. Beach. alias Bush
of Co “E” together with Stamford and
another one of Co “E” and Adams of Co
“A” were confined in dark cell on bread
and water diet.. Esmond and Bush for
forty eight hours. the others for three days..
During the day they cut off two
planks and commenced a hole in the
outside when discovered. This was reported
to Major Newcombe who ordered them
to be tied.. But Lieut Schill of the Battery
who was Officer of Day refused to leave
them tied: But he removed them to
another cell where they remained
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 111

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

110

After that they were more civil
and remained quite still during the
remainder of the day and night..
[illegible in original] and Bellinger of Co ‘A’ were
brought in by Tom Smith of Co “E”
being found downtown about twelve
O’clock at night.. I got Lieut Briggs
to order their release about nine
O’clock this morning: “Dixie” was
also in there in the morning when
we first took charge But Lieut
Briggs ordered his release during
the day. and he left. promising to
behave himself and do his duty like
a man hereafter:
This morning finding that my
looks began to show wear some I
went to the city and got them [illegible in original]..
While there I met Sergt Thomas and
together we visited a great many
of the manufacturing establishments
that I had never before visited.
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 112

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

111

Thus we spent the time alloted to us
by our passes. not. I am proud to say. as
some do. But visiting places at once
respectable and instructive.. The Foundry
and Oil refinery back of Canal Street
are large and extensive. showing thrift
and enterprise: The Gas factory on
Justice Street is also an interesting
place to visit.. Thomas is an intel
ligent and pretty well educated young
man, and is good company indeed..
Just as I got back to camp I found
the company falling in and was ordered
to fall in likewise: I did so, listening
somewhat to various reports: and was marched
to the reading room where we found Surgeon
Upjohn who vaccinated each and every one
without regard to whether they had before
endured it or not.
Other companies have been draw
ing there sabres and cartridge boxes
and belts, also the scales for their
shoulders
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 113

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

112

This is I beleive in accordance with
an order from Col Mann issued on
Dress Parade yesterday: Our company
have drawn their shoulder [plates?]
but Lieut Briggs thinks that the
men now have more than they
can easily do, without having any more
arms to take care of and therefore
will not issue them as long as it
can be warded off.. I think this is
a sensible view of the case..
A number of new recruits came in
this morning. and every enlisted man
belonging to the regiment is ordered to
be in camp this week..
George Matchett from Niles just came
in tonight having returned from a
furlough: No Others have come in as yet
to night.. Mealoy came in last night.
I received an interesting letter
from John Cowles last Saturday
evening. He is now in New Orleans
again

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 114

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

113

Lee Barracks Tuesday
January 13, 1863
The past week I have been so busy
that I could not find the time to write
any. It has been drill every spare moment
of the time we have not done stable duty..
Once or twice during the past week
there has a little snow fallen, but the greater
part of the time we have had very good
weather.. To day it is raining: a cold frozen
sleet: making the ground very slippery and
everything very disagreeable: consequently
we have not watered our horses this mor
ning: Everything goes on in nearly
the same old [illegible in original] [tracks?]: I have not been
on guard quite so often during the past
a
week as formerly: On ^ Thursday I
was again Segt of the Guard and Segt
Thomas of Co “D” Officer of Guard..
and we enjoyed a first rate good
time: On Wednesday morning
after coming back from watering
the horses. on opening the door of our
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 115

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

114

quarters what was my surprise to see
Dan [Lingo?] standing by the stove:
I could not have been more surprised
had I as suddenly found myself
at home. Tom Smith. “E.” and G Brickle
Wm Henderson. and G.B. Marchett
returned about the same time.
Newt Sparks returned to Camp Wednesday
morning bringing from home. for me
a pair of good gloves. and the pictures of
Father and Mother.. and letters from
home and other friends:
Capt. Walker returned at the same
time with Newt. but left for Detroit
the next morning. and from there
to Niles. again: When he will return
again is not known to us:
Lieut Nichols returned at the
same time and has been with us
at intervals since. but Lieut Briggs
is the mainstay. Newt Sparks yester
day received orders from Col Mann
to act as chief bugler of the regiment
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 116

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

115

I received letters from Irenus
McGowan.. [T.M. Fulson?] G. W Lee
none
and others last week to all of which
I have not yet found time to answer..
Last night I received a letter from
Nell saying that he was sick with a
disease somewhat like the measles: but
was recovering again:
Once or twice during the past week
Col Mann drilled the Officers and
non-commissioned officers in the
correct formations of their companies
and in marching in column. by file
by. twos and by fours: Nearly every
evening there has been a drill in the
manual of arms with rifle. in the drill
room A Battalion drill is held
whenever the weather permits and Dress
Parade every afternoon.. Sunday after
watering duty was performed we had an
inspection of arms and everything before
dinner: after dinner and stable duty
was again over we had preaching by a
young man just from the army in
the field
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 117

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

116

Yesterday morning we had drill in
marching under direction of Col. Mann at
which all field Officers. commissioned and
non commissioned officers were ordered
to be present each one with a rifle..
In the afternoon a drill of all officers
in the Sabre exercise. under Col.. Mann..
I was considerably diverted at Major
Houston.. who has considerable fun in
him and says the privates know no
more about these things than he does..
Marion Nicols returned on Saturday
last.. having been absent about two
months: He reports Crocker as being
too unwell yet to return to camp
We have been living rather hard for
a long time back and a good many com
plaints have been made. but nothing has
been done to help the matter any..
This morning we had so little bread
that many of us did not get a crumb
i
and those deta^led for guard refused
to go until they had their breakfast
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 118

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

117

They stuck to this resolution against
all orders. threats and entreaties. until
Lieut Briggs promised to get their break
fast at the Sutlers and see that it did
not occur again.. Whether this will
help the matter hereafter remains
to be seen: We are all looking for
better times when Capt Walker gets
with us again.. which we hope will be
soon:
A new company was reported as
coming in last night but I have
not heard any thing of it this mor
ning: It somewhat resembles the mor
ning one which we first saw Camp
Kellogg. but is much colder..
It is four months last
night since I enlisted and we
have not received a cent of money
yet. excepting our 25 dollars bounty
Col Smith was reported to be in
the city last.. evening but we
do not know this to be true
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 119

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

118

Lee Barracks Saturday
January 17th 1863..
The weather this week has been quite
variable; part of the time cold. clear
and pleasant. and a part of the time
stormy and disagreeable.
Capt Walker returned to camp
on Tuesday evening. bringing with
him two recruits. Schrouder and
Davis. He remains with us still
and will do so hereafter..
As Sergt Holton was unwell
Tuesday I performed his duties that
day and next. long enough to mount
the guard next morning. when
Sergt Loomis took my place for which
I was truly thankful. when I found
myself. or him called upon to make
out a list of all the men in the
company stating when and where
they enlisted whether married or
unmarried. preparatory to a final
muster. giving to the proper places
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 120

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

119

the credit of those men who have enlist
ed. from those places..
This muster took places on Thursday
afternoon with our company and com
pany “B” with the remaining. companies
yesterday.. These rolls will be sent im
mediately to the office of the Adjutant
Generals office and the proper credit
immediately given to the different
places: As Richardson was also
sick Capt Walker desired me to take
his place and act as Commissary
Sergt for a while: Richardson has
injured himself badly. While riding
a horse some time ago the horse
stumbled injuring him severely
and he is now suffereing a great
deal: being unable to leave his bed except
when absolutely necessary: I did
not know but little about the
business but am gaining some
on the manner of carrying it
on:
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 121

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

120
Yesterday the commanders of
the companies drew for the colors
of their horses: Capt Walker at first
drew light bays but not being sat
isfied he exchanged them for dark
bays.. This afternoon the companies have
had their horses assigned them. but not
to individuals.. which will be done
probably on Monday: Our company
has been assigned seventy-two horses..
I do not know what luck they have
had in the quality of the horses as I was
obliged to come to camp to draw
some rations before the division was
completed and did not go back
again:
Col. Mann went to Detroit
this morning: when he will return
is not known. neither. his errand..
It is said that Col Smith will
come here next week and mus
ter the regiment in. and if full
pay what is due them
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 122

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

121
Sergt E.D. Cooke returned to camp
on Wednesday evening bringing with him
R.R. Bradley who had been home on
furlough. Bradley was detailed for
Special duty the next day. and
Ed. Cooke is now acting in his
proper capacity of Quartermaster
Sergt..
Lieut Nichols reported for duty
yesterday morning and was put on
as officer of Day. to day:
I received a letter from Isom
and Melinda Thursday evening and
answered it yesterday.. A slight fall
of snow came on Thursday night..
making the ground white. but not
giving us any sleighing:
Several new companies have
come into camp during the week past..
and our commissary told me that
he was feeding nine hundred men
at present..
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 123

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

122
Lee Barracks Tuesday
January 20, 1863..
The weather since Saturday has
taken a slight change: but for better
or worse it is hard to determine.
Sunday was as usual clear and
cold.. In addition to our usual weekly
duties we were obliged to go through
our weekly inspection. and Dress
Parade in the afternoon:
Monday was cold and not quite so
pleasant as was Sunday: I attended
to the drawing of our commissary stores..
At Eleven we had a drill of commis
sioned and non commissioned officers
drills in marching.. At nine
Oclock in the morning there was
a drill of the companies in manual
of arms. and marching. In the
afternoon at 3 O.clock we had
another drill by companies.. and
no Dress Parade: We do not
water horses but once a day at
present and that at noon.

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 124

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

123

Last night it commenced to
snow and blow and this morning
there were nearly three inches of
snow: and a few emboldened by
the prospect of sleighing harnessed up
their sleighs and cutters and
tried to enjoy the sleighing
and at noon while watering our horses
we saw several of them flying through
the streets:
This forenoon Col. Litchfield held
a recitation in the Tactics at the drill
room: and to night there is a drill of
commissioned Officers in the School
of the [trooper?]:
The weather has moderated con
siderable during the day: and it was
thawing at sunset..
It is reported that Col. Smith.
is in the city to night..

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 125

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

124

Alexander Lowrie has
received a furlough and will
start for his home in Ohio to
morrow morning.. Richardson
will probably get either a furlough
or a discharge soon. and return
home; Old Uncle Jones will also
be discharged soon:
George. Strong from Niles came
into camp last night bringing a
box of provisions for Hollis. Cox
and some others of the boys..

Lee Barracks Sunday
January 25th 1863.
Weather of all Sorts during the past
week.. Rain and snow one day. snow
and rain the next. mud ankle deep [illegible in original]
and gaining fast.. Last night it froze
and this morning the ground was
quite hard. But before noon it was
as muddy as ever again..
Col Mann thinking that we did
not have enough to do. last night
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 126

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

125

ordered the horses watered twice a day
again: So that we found ourselves this
morning obliged to water our horses..
then divide them up in to squads. after
which came our usual inspection of arms
and bunks: the inspection this morning
was of Sabres with which all Dress
Parades and Guard mountings and
guard duties are performed..
The horses were assigned to
the men on Wednesday or Thursday
morning last.. and the men now exhibit
more of an enthusiastic zeal in seeing
their horses well taken care of..
Thursday morning I was much
surprised to see John Alexander
in camp just as we were eating
breakfast He still remains with
us.. Yesterday afternoon Col
Mann. had the companies all
called out and read orders to the
effect that as some of the soldiers
while out on passes had conducted
themselves in such a manner as
to bring many complaints from citizens

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 127

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863


126
Consequently no more passes
would be given to any one and that
all standing passes except those
of the Sergeant Major Quartermaster
and Commissary Sergeants and
Orderlies and those good only
between Revellie and Tattoo:
This did not suit the ideas of
many of the men. and they showed
their disapprobation by getting up
a regular mob and a large body
of them broke Guard and went to
the city: What antics were cut
I do not know. but report says
that Private March of Co D
got drunk and while committing
some abuses on a private house
the owner came out and after suc
ceeding in wresting his sword from
him struck him over the head in
flicting a wound from the effects
of which it is said he died to day..
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 128

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

127
Thursday morning I received
two letters one from Nell. the other
from Newton Stephens dated New
Haven Ky.. Jan 18th and saying that
the snow was then 15 inches deep with
them. and on account of the severity of
the weather roll call and Guard duties
were dispensed with.. This seems
quite a contrast to our mild and
open weather and seems almost im
possible: According to new regulations
made by Capt Walker each Sergt is
required to call the roll of his platoon
and is responsible for his men.
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 129

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863


128
Lee Barracks Monday
January 26th 1863.
No change in wind or weather
of any importance. less frost and
more mud than yesterday..
Sometime within the last two
days Sergt Holton received directions
from headquarters to leave on a recruit
ing expedition: and he accordingly
left about four P..M. today leaving
his
Sergt E.D. Cooke to perform.^ duties:
Ed, does not like to perform them
on account of some dissatisfaction:
between O’Brien and Lang about
arising from jealousy or some
other cause from which grumblings
and complaints issue: which seems
to me altogether out of place;
To day while the companies were
doing stable duty at noon; fires broke
out in the guard house: which con
sumed it but did not communicate
with the reading room owing to the
united efforts of the guards and
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 130

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

129

other soldiers in camp. who kept put
ting on water on the end nearest the guard
house: It was at first suspected that
the prisoners of whom there were five or
six confined had set it on fire purpose
ly: But it is Said by some that it
was not as fire first broke out in
a corner remote from the cells..
On account of the recent broil
on Saturday night. Col Mann.
has instituted a Provost Guard
composed of one private from one
each company: commanded by some
officer unknown at the present time:
Private Edward Brickle of our
company is detailed on this duty:
They are armed with the sabres. and their
revolvers which were drawn for them today..
These revolvers are a [vere?] nice weapon and
will I think be found the most service
able arm with which we are furnished..
They are Colt Navy Size. six Shooters
black finished. and we are also furnished
with a good holster for each one;
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 131

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

130

Lee Barracks. Wednesday
January 28th 1863.
Yesterday was a most beautiful
day. clear and pleasant. having almost
no resemblance to the weather usual
to this season of the year.. We did
not water our horses in the morning
but instead repaired our stables..
until eleven O.clock when all the
“Commish” and “noncommish” of the
regiment were required to drill
until noon: After dinner we watered
our horses. after that battalion drill
and Dress Parade in the evening
all “non commish” were required to
meet at the Assembly room for a
recitation in the tactics and
theory of our drill: It is intended
to carry on these recitations during
the time we remain here;
On Monday evening Capt Walker
invited all the “non commish” of Co “A”
to an Oyster Supper at Wells which
we enjoyed very well..

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 132

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

131

This morning the weather is again
cold and lowry.. We are preparing to
draw the saddles this morning
preparatory to a drill each
morning.. I wish the saddles
could remain where they are
while we remain here as we have
all that we can take care of properly
now.. Our bunks are full and
no place is yet provided for keeping
the saddles. and it is a query to
me where we can keep them;
Since the burning of the guard
house Monday afternoon. Col Mann
has felt as uneasy as a fish out of
water fearing the quarters of the men
might burn down. Barber and
McNiel returned to camp last night.
after having been reported as deserters
for more than a month.. Charles
Hopkins has deserted.. I think as he has
not reported himself since Monday
afternoon,
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 133

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

132

Lee Barracks Thursday
January 29th 1863
After writing the preceeding pages
we went to the stables and fitted each
man when we could find to a saddle
for his horse. By the time this was done
it was dinner time. after which the horses
were watered: No “Dress Parade’ was held
in the afternoon giving us a little
more time to rest than was usual
for us: I did not attend the recitation
in the evening and indeed I do not
know as there was any; The weather
after 10 O’clock was very fine and clear
the remainder of the day. I received a letter
from Nell last evening enclosing I a
dozen Postage Stamps.. To day the
weather is cold and cloudy with
now and then a flake of snow..
A drill on horseback was ordered
this morning. afterwards. Col Mann
called on our company, and I guess
others of the regiment for a detail of
Sixteen men. to drill preparatory
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 134

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

133

to a funeral escort for some mili
tary scout celebrity. and it is under
stood that this detail will stand
in the company in readiness
for any case of death that may occur
in company or regiment. It is to
be hoped that it may never be called
to act for any of us: Sergt D OBrien
and Corporals Graham and Brickel
were detailed from our company to
act upon this detail.. After these
men were taken but few were left
for drill mounted.. However the
few that were left drilled under the
instructions of Segt E. D Cooke for
about two hours in mounting and
dismounting and marching by
file.. It is understood that
this drill will be continued
daily. hereafter
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 135

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

134

Lee Barracks Friday
January 30th /63
Another day with its usual routine
of duties is gone. and nothing of importance
has yet taken place.. The weather has been
cold and rather uncomfortable to those
compelled to be out of doors..
We drilled on horseback this fore
noon. each Sergt taking charge of his
squad and drilling them simply in
their positions and in keeping the
proper distance from apart when in
file.. Thinking I had done enough
as duty sergt I fell back upon my
position as commissary and did not
go to water horses. at noon.
The men of our company on funeral
escort detail did not drill in their
peculiar drill during the forenoon.
but on horseback.. This afternoon
they drilled and practiced a little
on firing which was done exceedingly
well. many saying it was done as
well as could be done by those well
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 136

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

135

trained to the service. and earning
great compliments from Col Mann
who never fails to reward any such
thing with profuse praises..
He yesterday morning praised
the appearance of my stables. which I con
sidered unworthy of the compliment..
Dress Parade was held this afternoon
for the purpose of reading [orders?]. and
sentences given by the late court martial..
Jack Jimison was sentenced to carry
a stick of wood of no less than 30 lbs
weight for two hours. John Conlin
to carry an inverted flour barrel
two hours his head protruding
through the head of it which rested
on his shoulders..
Allen.. Park. Chester Calvin
and Madison Cox left camp
last night without furlough
and are supposed to have gone
home: We all think they would
come back if let alone..
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 137

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

136

But Capt Walker has sent Sergt
OBrien after them who will
have the effect of driving them still
farther away: Allen is one not to be
driven into returning but if left
quietly alone I have no doubt would
return when his visit is finished
It seems to me impartial and
unjust to serve boys who have always
done their duty in this manner and
allow “roughs” like McNiel and others
to do as they please.
John Alexander left camp for
home. also Royal Tuttle this mor
ning. I can not beleive that
John would entice any one away
from their duty. But keeping the
men so long in camp without pay
or furlough will cause many more
to take “French leave”
It is understood by all that
no more furloughs will be given our
company.
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 138

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

137

Preaching is being held at the
Assembly room this evening by
Rev. Mr West who conducted services
there some few weeks ago.. I might
have gone but having a cold and the
room not being very comfortable I con
cluded not to do so:
We had another recitation
last evening under the instruction of
Major Newcomb.e. But hereafter it will
be conducted by Adjt [Doty?].. who is
a first class Scholar and highly respected
by all as an officer.. The school will
be held four evenings in a week and
will we hope be of great benefit to
us:
A few inches of snow fell last
night. but not enough to make
sleighing. It grows colder since
sundown and we may get weather
in February that will more than
repay us for our pleasant weather ere
this
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 139

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

138
Lee Barracks Saturday
January 31st 1863.
This is the last day of January
and the month goes out much as it
came in: Still the weather is some
colder than was New Years proving
that old winter has not lost all its
rigor of former years.. The day is cloudy
with a still W.N.W. breeze which whistles
among the cracks and crevices of our
quarters with much of its old tone
formerly so familiar to our ears..
The usual routine of camp duties is
not varied in the least.. The company
is not out drilling. but I, being,
until now, busily engaged in my
duties as commissary I gave up my
command to Anthony and remain
ed in camp..
More of the boys took “French
Furloughs” last night.. They are coming
into quite common use just now..
Among the boys who left last
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 140

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

139

night are ..[illegible in original]. [illegible in original]. Bell
linger. Fish. and [Hanney?]. and
Belleng Brininstool..
Many of these are good boys.
and those who have heretofore done
their duty like men: but who have,
been misled by evil minded men.
until they have been led to take
this step.. Many, and I think all
of these, will return when they have
visited long enough to satisfy them..
They are driven to this. only by the
refusal of Col Mann to grant them
furloughs.. and the delay in getting
their pay:
Among those who left. Thursday
I had forgotten to mention James Davis
who has not been seen since Thursday
morning: Many from other compa
nies are likewise deserting. and throw
ing heavy work upon those remaining
in camp..
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 141

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

140
Lee Barracks. Sunday
February 1st 1863
Another day is gone and Feb
ruary is fairly inaugurated and
fully established.. and right kingly
has she taken the reign.. the day
is a fair type of the usual days belong
ing usually to this month.. This morning
was cold but not showing many signs
of a storm. We got through with our stable
duties and inspection. in much better
time than is usual.. We had hardly
finished our inspection when the
wind commenced blowing furiously
and at first a few drops of rain
which however soon turned into
snow.. It soon snowed a perfect storm
of snow and sleet.. and now there is
quite a coat of snow..on the ground..
It looks rather good but it is not
very comfortable out of doors. after
all. The Guards are having an awful
night for standing on their beats..
They will be brought in from
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 142

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

141

the lines and placed within the doors
of the barracks to guard the fires..
I presume they will be placed on
the lines again in the morning..
This morning after inspection Col
Mann visited our quarters. and made
us a speech..which was very good..
Last night Wm Henderson.
Edward Brickle and George Matchett.
deserted and left camp.. I was
surprised to find George Matchett
gone as I thought it much better
of him: How many and [whom?]
leave tonight it is impossible to
conjecture.. Yet I doubt not there will
be some one.. I stated the other
evening that OBrien had gone
after those who were first to leave.
but it was not so.. This morning
however Lieut Nicols with permission
of Col Mann. gave him authority to
arrest these men and leave of absence
until the 9th of the present month..
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 143

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

142
Harvey Reynolds also got a fur
lough and both received free passes
to go and return. and have both
left camp this evening..
Capt Walker left camp for Detroit
yesterday morning intending to return
by way of Battle Creek and endeavor
to bring back those men who left on
Friday night.. Lieut Briggs also
left for Battle Creek yesterday mor
ning leaving Lieut Nicols in com
mand of the company.. Lieut Nicols
is gaining the good will and respect
of his men very fast. by his faithful
ness. and attention to their wants..
He has too the pow faculty of
control better than either Briggs
or Capt Walker..
It is now talked that we shall
leave the state soon. and I wish it
might be so.. for I think it would be
the best thing that could be done for
the regiment, the state, or the country..
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 144

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

143

As long as we remain here just
so long the men will desert: We now
have ten companies on the ground
and it is intended to form two
battalions of these companies and
send them to the field..
Nothing could suit me better
than this. so far as being with
the regiment is concerned..
Col Mann and Adjutant
Doty just came to our door as they
were visiting the quarters to see the con
ditions of the lights and fires..
Some things about Col Mann
are calculated to endear him to
the men, and would do so were it not
for qualities directly opposite to these
and overthrowing all of his good ones..
Tom Smith to day was very drunk
and in fact had been since last night
and took it into his head to leave
the regiment.. At dinnertime he
shook hands with all the boys

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 145

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

144
and bade them good bye. and
then walked out through the Sally
Port. paying no attention to the orders
of the Sentry to halt but walked straight
toward the city.. Lieut Littlefield
and some men went after him and
brought him back to camp again.
I was told that he came back crying
like a baby.. He lost his pocket book
in some manner last night. and under
influence of that and his liquor
was perfectly crazy. and it is a
great wonder that he did not set
the barracks on fire as he got candles
and thrust them among the straw
in his bunk.
The boys have a good deal of fun
with [Shrowder?] and others. and in
playing practical jokes on each other
some of which are not very pleasant..
But nearly every one takes it in
good part and no broken noses or
black eyes occur..
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 146

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

145

Lee Barracks. Tuesday
February 3d 1863..
The weather still remains cold
and wintry: Yesterday was much the
coldest day we have had this winter..
The winds blew a hurricane and
those foolhardy enough to be out met
with red ears and noses.. Sergt Major
Loomis and Adjutant Doty froze
their ears while mounting guard
yesterday morning: After drawing
my rations yesterday morning. I took
our largest boiler to the city to get
it fixed. and found it cold enough
to suit my fancy: The battery was
busy watering horses all the forenoon..
Our company watered theirs at
noon. but as I was too busily em
ployed in Commissary duties I could
not go with them.. It was too
cold for drill. but instead the
men were employed in repairing
the stables during the forenoon..
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 147

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

146
While Newton Sparks was
employed at Head Quarters as
bugler yesterday morning: he heard
the Col talking of a chance to raise a
company of volunteers up in the Muskegon
and Saginaw lumber country. and also
offering a chance to any one in the
regiment who would furnish the means
and would take hold of it.. I suppose
Newt considered the chances at first.
During the afternoon he spoke about
it to E D. Cooke. who offered to furnish
means and help him in recruiting
the company: the bargain was finally
struck between him. and then they
waited upon Col Mann. who promised
them his assistance. and gave them
an earnest by giving Newt authority
to recruit and also giving him
leave of absence from Camp for that
purpose.. He then gave him free passes
over stage and railroad routes. to allow
him to travel..
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 148

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

147

Newton made up his mind
to go home a day or two to procure
means.. and accordingly started
for home this morning..
As many of our soldiers come
back from town drunk every day. and
often bring with them bottles of whiskey
after the saloon keepers have been ordered
not to sell them any more whiskey..
Col Mann has become out of patience
with them. and desiring to find out the
places where soldiers get their liquor. he
desired Lieut Sessions of Co “D” Officer
of Day to procure three men who
could be relied upon and to send them
to these saloons and buy all the liquor
from them that they could..
Newt hearing the Col speaking of
this saw fit to recommend me as one fit
for that purpose: Accordingly I was
selected and together with Sergt Mitchell
of Co “D” and Private Gladden of the same
was sent out.
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 149

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

148
Newt and I went out together and
stopping at the “National” called for some
brandy and drinking it left.. Just after
leaving there we came across Mitchell and
Gladden.. Gladden visited Moriarty’s and
got his bottle filled.. Mitchell and I then
visited T.J. Gales and got some whiskey
of which I drank sparingly.. We next visited
Sargent’s and procured the same there
The next one on the route was the
Rathbun House. at the saloon under
which we procured the same. We next
visited the “Hole in the Wall..” where we
endeavored to induce the proprietor to
“treat” but finding he would not do so
Mitchell paid for the “drinks” all around..
The next was the “Franklin House” really
the worst “hole” in town. but the proprietor..
“smelt a rat” and would not allow us any..
Finding we could not preval upon him
to let us have any we left and next visited
the “Farmers Home” where we procured the
drinks and also got another bottle filled..

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 150

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

149

After staying and carousing awhile
we crossed the street and visited Klinger’s
at the Corner of Bridge and Canal Sts..
where we procured the drinks:
We then went into the Saloon two
doors south of “Klinger’s” where we got the
remaining bottle filled.. Gladden
and myself long before this time
had run short of funds.. and Mitchell
thinking he had spent money enough
and all agreeing that we had drank enough
we quitted the field and returned to camp
visiting on the way “Pop Corn Charlies”
where we were treated by a citizen..
In reading this account some
would think that we would have
been by this time “pretty tight” to use
the common term.. But fearing this
result. we were careful not to drink
all that we poured out each time..
and only enough to be able to swear as
to what we drank at each place.. and
therefore we returned to camp sober..
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 151

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

150
Today has been a pleasant day with
the exception of being a very cold one.
The sky was clear. and the sun shone
brightly.. yet the air was frosty and
keen.. We attended our usual
school under direction of our noble
Adjutant this evening who has
the faculty of making these recita
tions interesting to all:
After closing the school. he
visited our quarters and read us
orders and an address from Col.
Mann. and also stated that there
was now talk that the men now
in the 9th regiment of Cavalry
would be divided and put equally
in the 7th and 8th regiments filling
f both regiments.. and that we
would perhaps go to the west or
south west instead of to Washington
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 152

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

151
Lee Barracks Wednesday
February 4. 1863..
To day.. has been much such a day as was
yesterday clear but very cold: It was so
cold that we have done nothing but what
necessity absolutely required to be done:
and I have not done even that.. not
feeling very well I have not been to the
stables since morning.. It is almost useless
to continue writing this diary. as every
day is like its preceding ones. the same
dull routine of duties. the same amount
of hard work to get men to perform
any duties. nothing whatever to relieve
us from the monotony of camp duties..
We get no papers to read. consequently
hear nothing from the outer world
except by letters from our friends.
which, so far as I am favored have been
very few for a long time past..
Plenty of rumors are afloat in
camp concerning our future. and
the manner in which we are to be
disposed of..
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 153

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

152
It is hoped by all that some
arrangement may be made by
which this regiment may be
filled and sent to the field very
soon.. It is said that Col Mann
is away upon that business and is
hoping to effect some arrangement
with the Col of the 9th to induce him
to unite his men with ours to a
sufficient number to fill our regiment.
It seems almost unjust to this
regiment that Gov. Blair should
have sanctioned the forming of
the 8th and 9th after this one was
organized: But it secured him
political influence and votes.
and also opposed Col Kellogg’s efforts
to raise his regiment..
Of what service I have we been to
the government while we have been
here.. None at all I venture to
say..

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 154

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

153
We have not be even been
fitting ourselves for the field
by drill or otherwise except being
furnished with arms and equip
ments.. We do not know as much
to day of the movements of a body
of troops to day as we did the
day Botham left us.. Mann
has taught us nothing of a
soldiers duties except to care for
our horses.. He has not even taught
his men to obey him yet.. and never
will so long as we remain here..
W.H.H.. Knight who has been
away some days is reported to have
returned to camp this evening..
Yesterday morning Wisner
was put upon the Provost
Guard in Brickle’s place.
and Mealoy was put on as
a new man..

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 155

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

[Begin Scan 155]

154

An hour later: Capt Walker has returned
to camp bringing with him Conlin Fish.
Harvey. Brininstool and Beers; leaving
Bellinger at home sick.. The boys
seem to feel very well and are jolly
over their return to camp..
I do not know what is to be done
with them. I hope however nothing
more will be done with them than.
to deduct a sufficient sum from
their wages. to punish them for their
furloughs.. for which I can scarcely
find the heart to blame them..
I have just received information that
there would be no school this evening..
and we have nothing to do..
This diary may not be interesting to
anyone. who may read it in future..
But they must recollect that it
has afforded me employment for many
hours that might have been more
unprofitably employed..
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 156

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

155

Lee Barracks. Thursday
January February 5th /63

This has been slightly different from
yesterday inasmuch as it has snowed
nearly all day: and the prospects for sleigh
ing are good. and I think no one will
be sorry.. It is still quite cold though
not so cold as yesterday:
We did not drill, the stable duty
being all we were required to perform..
The boys brought back by Capt.
Walker were taken before Major New
combe. during the forenoon for examina
tion. John. Conlin was committed to jail
to await trial for desertion: and the rest
were given into Capt. Walker’s custody
on his taking the responsibility of their desertion
and allowing him to put them upon any
duty which he saw fit with the exception of
guard duty..
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 157

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

156
Capt. Walker thinking he could spare
a few men consented to furlough until
the Twelfth all whom he thought most
deserved one.. Consequenlty he gave furloughs
to Harvey Horsch. Brickell. Malchett.
Dumphrey Trumble Jimison. and Ewing..
whose furloughs all expire on the Twelfth.

Lee Barracks. Saturday
February 7th 1863..
Yesterday and today have been slightly
different from those preceding. Clear. Sunny.
but cold.. Yesterday morning we were ordered
out to drill on horseback. which drill was only
a repetition of former ones.. The afternoon was
occupied in attending to stable duties. and
the evening to a lesson in the tactics..
At night Henderson and Brickell returned
having been absent less than a week
They said that George Matchett had
enlisted in the regulars for five years..
They have been in Canada nearly all of the
time since they left..
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 158

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

157

This morning we were again ordered
out to drill the drill being the same.
Ed was taken to jail upon the order
of Major Newcombe while Henderson
who was undoubtedly the ringleader of
the desertion and the cause of Eds. mis
fortune is only placed in the custody of
Capt Walker to await his trial..
Seven who deserted from Co “I” on
Thursday night and captured some time
yesterday were taken to jail this morning..
There must be at present nearly seventy
or more soldiers belonging to this regiment
now confined in jail.. Tom Smith who
will promise to behave himself and quit
drinking: last night because the Major
would not give him a pass to go to the
theater ran the guard. got drunk. went to
the theater, and was caught by the patrol and
put in the guard house.. this morning he
got out of there some way or other. went to
town and got his bitters and then returned
and reported himself at the guard house again.
He will now have to stand a court martial.
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 159

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

158

Lee Barracks Sunday
February 8th 1863.
The day has been slightly stormy since
noon or a little before.. and rather cold..
Weekly inspection again this morning
after which religious services were held at
the assembly rooms at Eleven Oclock..
The funeral for which we have been
preparing during the two weeks past took place
this afternoon at the Episcopalian Church
on Division St.. An escort of 12 men one Segt
and Lieut Nichols from our Co. and others of the
same number from “B.” “C” and “D.” attended
and escorted the boy to the grave.. also an
independent company of 24 from the
city.. I was not able to attend as I did
not feel very well and none of the com
pany except those detailed as an escort
went.
Chester Calvin returned to camp
last evening.. He did not bring much
news form home. but said that Newt
Harve and Bill OBrien would be
here on Tuesday..
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 160

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

159

Pitts Walling who has been in the
hospital with the mumps returned to
camp this morning.. nearly well but looking
pretty plump in the face.. Sergt Major
Wilkinson returned to camp last evening
but will leave again tomorrow morning..
Every one seems to want to get rid of
him even the Staff. officers are tired
of having him around and Heaven
knows if they have as much reason to
find fault with him as First Sergts
and Company officers have no one
can wonder at it.. Loomis will fill
his place while he is gone..
Services were held at the Assembly
room this evening by the regimental
Chaplain who is as yet unknown to me..
I did not attend as [Hienck?] is sick
and under my care for the night
and I could not leave him..
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 161

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

160
Lee Barracks. [Grd Rap?]
Monday. February 9th /63
Today has been a wet. stormy and
disagreeable day. This morning I
again went to the city on the same
errand as on last Monday. I returned
just before dinner.. and after eating that.
I went with the company to water horses
It rained hard all the time while we
were going to water and back and the con
sequence was we got wet.. As Anthony was
not very well I took his place and assisted
about feeding, not going the second time..
Anthony had quite a shake of the Ague
after returning to the quarters. this afternoon
After supper. the ditches at the stables
being full of water the boys bailed them out
with spades and boards. and they got them
quite dry:
Sergt Lang took it into his
head this evening to have a little fun and
started the report that Col Mann had
returned bringing news that the
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 162

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

161

regiment would be filled up with
negroes and that five hundred would
be in camp next week.. Absurd as this
report was it was repeated from one to another
until within less than one hour whe it
had spread over the entire camp and was
beleived by many.. The part concerning
the Cols return was plausible enough and
would mislead almost any one. but that
concerning the negroes was too much
for any one of common sense to credit for
a moment.. But the readiness with which
it was received shows in what a state of
mind the men’s minds are..
Capt Walker told me this afternoon
that a telegraphic dispatch was received
this morning that we would receive one
months pay on the Seventeenth of this
month. He seemed to think there
might be truth in this as I hope there
may be, alhtough it will not help many.
of us much.. as 13 dollars will not go a great
ways with us
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 163

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

162
He also told me that if Billy. O.Brien
returned tonight he would give me a furlough
until the Sixteenth. and if he did not come
until tomorrow evening he would then give
me one. then until the same day.. Billy has
not come. and when he does Capt may choose
to change his mind..
I have been suffering this afternoon with
m
an inflam^ed eye which is rather weak to use
about writing by candlelight.
It is said that Whitcomb of Co “E”
died at the hospital yesterday morning from
inflammation on the lungs which at length
settled on his brain causing his death..
Several men in one of the companies
near the lower part of the barracks are sick
with the mumps. which seem to be spreading
considerably. But few cases of more
malignant diseases are reported or known of..
in the regiment which I must say has
been greatly favored thus far..
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 164

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

163

Lee Barracks Thursday
February 12th 1863
The weather for the past two days
has been very pleasant.. Yesterday was clear
sunny and warm.. today is not so warm
nor so pleasant yet much so for this time
of year.. Monday afternoon after returning
from stable duty the company fell out
with our rifles and fired a few rounds of
blank cartridges.. Yesterday morning we were
ordered out to practice target shooting
with ball cartridges.. The target was placed
about an hundred and fifty yards away
and I think I can safely say that no ball
entered the paper although many came
very close to it.. This morning the company
again went out to practice firing but with
blank or ball cartirdges I do not know.
Newt Sparks. W. OBrien. H L Reynolds.
Allen Park and Madison Cox returned
to camp bringing with them Mr Lee
who brought with him his bass drum..
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 165

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

164
It was their intention to have the
remainder of the Buchanan Band follow
provided that the Col would give them em
ployment and good compensation: But he
thinks that we will remain so short a time
that it will not be profitable to have them
come: consequently “Uncle Jim” will return
home tomorrow.
The Col ordered the Quartermaster this
morning to pack up everything and be prepared
to move at any time: I also heard Chas
Pratt say that they were at work preparing to
pack up.. This looks as though something
towards leaving were to be done.. Col Mann
has also ordered the rations to be used on
our journey to be provided by the Commis
sary.. The rations consist of Hard Bread. Crackers..
bacon. Ham. and Bologna Sausages.. Bully for
the Sausages..
This afternoon the Col held a drill
in the Sabre exercise. at which all the commissioned
and non commissioned officers were ordered to be
present: but I had “other business” and did
not attend..
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 166

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

165

Ed Harvey. Peter Horsch and Ed Dumphrey.
have returned this evening. leaving Jimison,
Trumble, Brickell. Marchett.. and Ewing to
return yet.. I received a letter from John
Cowles this afternoon dated at camp Dudley.
New Orleans.. and giving an interesting account
of a recent battle about 130 miles from New
Orleans: where they whipped out the rebels. and
destroyed an iron clad gunboat..
Dixie received a furlough this evening
to go home until Monday next..
Mr Lee is amusing the soldiers this
evening with an exhibition of his powers
as a drummer. They all agree that he
beats any one they have ever yet seen:
drum: I wish the whole band would
have come then we could have had music
sounding like home once more.. I received
a box of eatables from home by Newt Sparks
last night which made me think of old
times as the box containing it was the same
that I used to carry my dinner in last
winter to school..
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 167

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

166
Lee Barracks Tuesday
February 17th 1863
Returned to camp last evening from
a short furlough and visit at home.
Friday morning last we were ordered
out to practice target shooting with our
rifles after which. when I reached the
camp. Ed. Cooke spoke to me and advised
me if I intended going home to do so
then as he thought I would have no
opportunity afterwards.. I decided upon
accepting his advice and acting upon
it.. Accordingly I saw Capt Walker
who gave me permission to go home:
It was too late to get a furlough
signed as orders were received during the
forenoon to grant no more furloughs.
But Capt Walker wrote an order
detailing me to go on private business
for himself and Major Newcombe signed
I left camp just after dinner
and walked as far as Kelloggville where
I found a chance to ride to Chambers
Corners..
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 168

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

167

After riding a while with
them I got a chance to ride faster
and took advantage of this opportunity
which took me nearly to Van Lew’s and
from there I walked nearly to
Saunders when a team overtook me
and I rode through to Chambers Corners
After getting something to eat
I began to look around for some one
to take me to Kalamazoo. and after
fooling away the time until after
nine Oclock when I found some one
to do so and reached Kalamazoo
after two O’clock. The train going west
reached there at 3.45 and I reached
Buchanan at [illegible in original] next morning
and home about 8.. Saturday evening
I attended a party at Mr Stephens’
where I met most of the young
folks and spent a very good time:
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 169

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

168
It was expected when I went away
that we should receive our pay Today.
But it has been postponed from some
cause or other unknown to us.
News was received from Washington
last evening that we should receive pay
from enlistment until December 31st
and those who have enlisted since then
are to receive one months pay in advance.
This is much better than was feared
would be the case.. It is also thought
that we will leave here soon.. Perhaps within
the next two weeks. There has been some
talk of sending the horses away this week
still nothing is known positively as yet.
concerning the intentions of the Government
as relating to us..
While com eating breakfast
at the Kalamazoo House yesterday mor
ning I sat by the side of a Lieut. wearing
the uniform of the 25th Infantry.
We entered into conversation while at
breakfast. and I afterwards found that
he was coming through to the Rapids with
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 170

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

169

us and I found him quite an agreeable
companion. as I think every one did..
His name was Chase and he belonged
to Co “B..” I found that he knew many
of my friends in that regiment..
He told us many things. of interest
concerning our future life and of times
he had seen and also gave us good advice
to govern ourselves by:
He left on the five O’clock train
for the East intending to go as far as
Ionia..
I heard yesterday from Jas Barney
of Co “B” that private Safford of Co “B”
had died I think on Thursday last..
His body was sent to Kalamazoo in
charge of Smith of Co “B.” at Present
regimental cook.. Capt. Warner of Co “B”
came through on the train with us
from Niles and passed Hollils. Matchett
and myself through to Kalamazoo [free?].
Received a letter from Isom and Melinda
this evening.
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 171

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

170
Col. Mann. Col. Litchfield.
Col Howard and our Sergt. Major came
this
in last evening.. and it is thought
that Col Howard will proceed to pay
off the men as soon as possible.

Lee Barracks Thursday
February 19th 1863.
Well at last the vanguard of the regiment
is on the road to Washington.. Soon after
breakfast and guard mounting yesterday
morning we were ordered to fall in for
pay. The first thing to be done was to
sign the payrolls. which was done by 11 Oclock
we then marched to the drill room where
Col Howard sat ready to dispense “Green
Backs” and joy to the boys who had long
expected and waited for them.. As soon
as the pay was received we were provided with
a haversack to each man.. Twenty three
men were detailed to go away with the
horses and ordered to pack up everything
immediately
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 172

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

171

Then I was ordered to draw six days
rations for these men, have them cooked, two days
packed in the haversacks and four in boxes..
The men were ordered to be ready by eight
O’clock this morning and at that time
the horses
they commenced removing them from stables
to depot where they were loaded on the cars:
This morning it was understood that the
ladies of the city would give us a dinner at camp.
As I wanted to send home some money.
Newt Sparks and I went to the city. did our
business, and was returning to camp when we
saw the regiment going down one of the streets
and feeling a curiosity to know what it meant
we followed them to Luce Hall where we
found a nice collection of pictures which
we were permitted to look at that and then
returned to camp where about three O’clock
we had a splendid dinner, got up by the
ladies of the city.. The boys then left for
the railroad and about six O’clock I heard
them cheering loudly and lustily as they
passed in sight of the old camp for
the last time.
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 173

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

172
Sergt Holton returned to camp yesterday
morning just in time for his pay.. and
has left camp again tonight on special duty
detailed by the Colonel. Sergt E. S. Lang has
also gone in advance of the regiment to Washing
ton on business for the regiment. Sergt OBrien
is also from camps on special detail from
the Colonel. Corporal Crook has gone home
on furlough and will be back on Sunday night..
It is expected that the rest of us will leave
here on Monday next.. and it is decided that
we shall go to Washington:
I sent 20 dollars to Father this morning
by express leaving me about 27 dollars to
carry with me.. I drew [illegible in original] as my pay
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 174

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

173

Lee Barracks Friday
February 20th 1863
I take my pen in hand
this evening to write my last words
in this book. and the last of my
journal from “Lee Barracks”
We will leave here on Monday next
but I shall have no time to continue
this any longer as we shall be very
busy after this time.. Commissary
Sergt E.B. Crocker returned to camp
this morning: and I immediately
installed him in the position and
took a holiday: But to begin with
I will go back to last night Sergt
Holton was detailed and left camp
leaving instructions that E.D. Cooke.
should act in his place during his absence.
He did not return from his party
last night at roll call and I there
fore left the room open for him: This mor
ning. I awoke at the usual hour and got
my men awakened for roll call and then
went to his room but could not find
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 175

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

174

him. No commissioned officer presented
himself and feeling somewhat spunky
I would call no roll until some one came
the consequence is that the Revellie roll
has not been called to day; I would not
detail any guard without orders from the Capt
to do so. and not until after eight Oclock
did I hear from him and then was
sent for to call at his ofice where I found
him just getting up.. He requested me
as the only Sergt on the ground to detail
the guard and to mount them. I did so
rather reluctantly and I think with not
very good grace.. After instructing
Crocker in his duties I went to the am
brotype gallery and got two pictures
taken: which I shall send home..
At noon I bought a certificate of
our old peddler and Newt having done
the same we procured a pass and went
to the city to have them expressed home..
I had decided to send my valise home
and so bought me a sachel in which
I have packed all things which I
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 176

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

175

wanted to send home: Everything is being
packed up in readiness to be moved
tomorrow or Monday. guns. sabres
and blankets are fast being stowed
away and every thing seems lonesome
and forsaken in the barracks..
But the best joke of the season is that
Crocker and myself have got to stand
guard at the doors of the barracks tonight..
I can not conceive the reasons for this
step and have no right to question it.
but it is “tough on the subscriber..”
There; in turning over the preceding
leaf I find I have skipped two pages..
But I must stop writing; and
in leaving this book and the camp
where the scenes. feelings and all occurrences
have taken place feelings and thoughts
come crowding into my mind which
are strangely varied. Nearly all are
rejoiced at the idea of leaving the state
yet but few realize what we are leaving
and what we shall see: after reaching.
Washington
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863 , Page: 177

Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863
Edwin R. Havens Diary October 18, 1862 through February 20, 1863

176
How many of us who are now
leaving these comfortable quarters will
ever return to their homes again. or who
will find their last long home in
that far away land.. Alas I dare not
anticipate: But few will ever see
Michigan again and no one knows
whom it will be: perhaps it may
be myself yet I can not but feel
that I shall see home and friends
again:
I Shall renew my journal as
soon as possible: perhaps while on our
journey to Washington: As this will
fall into the hands of those who will
doubtless read it it.. I hope they will look
upon the mistakes and uninteresting pages
which it contains. with all allowances and
realize that had not the moments passed
in this. been so occupied they would
have been occupied otherwise and perhaps
not so well as in this way.
So Good Bye to Lee Barracks and
Michigan:
Edwin R Havens
Contact us with Questions or Comments