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Havens Letter: September 17 1865

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Creator: Edwin R. Havens
Subjects: Civil War, 1861-1865
Date: September 17, 1865
Format: Image/jpg
Original Format: Document
Collection Number: LC00016 – Havens Family Papers, Box 2, Folder 12
Language: English
Rights Management: Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by Michigan State University and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the University Archives & Historical Collections, Michigan State University.
Contributing Institution: Michigan State University Archives & Historical Collections
Relation: LC00016 – Havens Family Papers, Box 2, Folder 12
Contributor: MSU Archives and Historical Collections
Havens Letter: September 17 1865 , Page: 1

Havens Letter: September 17 1865
Havens Letter: September 17 1865

Stonewall Station C. T.
Sunday September 17th 1865

Dear Nell.
Yours of Sept. 3d was received yester
day morning and as it enables me to “issue” my
regular “weekly” I will answer it today although
I very much doubt my ability to interest you.
The past week has been very warm. very dry. very
dusty.. and very monotonous. I remained at
the “Dale” until Tuesday morning having assisted
on Monday in making out Pay Rolls. for Aug.
3rd. on Sunday the Act. Asst. Inspector Gen.
on Col Brigg’s staff arrived on a tour of inspection
of the troops at various Stations along the route. Of
course he found me “non est” when he arrived
here. and of course reported it to Hd Quarters at
Fort Collins. and yesterday morning. I was honored
by the receipt of a big Envelope. with “Official
Business” written across the top. An opening it I
found orders requiring me to make a written
report to those Head Quarters immediately showing
Havens Letter: September 17 1865 , Page: 2

Havens Letter: September 17 1865
Havens Letter: September 17 1865

cause why I was absent on said day. It
was a very easy matter to do that as I went on
business and returned when I had finished it.
Tuesday afternoon. while taking an after dinner
“siesta” I was aroused by some one calling my
name and crawling out of my tent. found to my
dismay that I had visitors of some importance
who were going to spend the night here. They
proved to be Gov. Duryer of Utah and a companion
named Head escorted by a Captain and fifteen
men of our regiment from Fort. Collins. I
was agreeably surprised to find the Gov. a very
plain every day man. and passed the time very
pleasantly. Thursday morning. a German Count
passed west on the coach. but I did not learn his
name. He could not speak a word of English. and
was accompanied by a personage of less note. but more
education, in that respect at least. They were on
their way to Sacramento on a tour of observation.
The coaches are now running daily each way.
the one going East. passing here at daylight. the other
at about nine A.M. It makes times more
lively and we have seen more “peoples” during
the past 8 days than during all the time we
Havens Letter: September 17 1865 , Page: 3

Havens Letter: September 17 1865
Havens Letter: September 17 1865

have been here before. On Sunday afternoon a
large train passed Va Dale on its way Eastward.
It consisted of a large freighter train returning from
Salt Lake or some other point in sight of [illegible in original]
town and a train of mountaineers who had
been in the vicinity of Fort Halleck and were on
their way to the Cache Le Poudre to winter. They
had two or three hundred head of cattle. some ponies
and mules. dogs. sheep goats and elks. five squaws
and a score or two of half-bred papooses. The
squaws rode ponies. sitting “a Straddle on a
mans saddle” and assisted in driving the stock
while the papooses trudged along on foot. Nearly
every mountaineer has one or more squaws and
the children look as though they had a good share
of white blood in them. probably “no white blood.
Half Ingen and half missionary.”
It is now rumored that the Government is
about to make peace with the hostile Indians.
and that the Gov. of Uta Colorado. escorted by a squad
ron of cavalry has gone to the “South Park”
for the purpose of treating with them. I almost
wonder at it as every settler here knows that they
only desire peace at this time to allow them to lay
Havens Letter: September 17 1865 , Page: 4

Havens Letter: September 17 1865
Havens Letter: September 17 1865

in a good store of supplies for their families
for the coming winter. They have made no pro
visions for the winter. cold weather is coming fast
and they can not follow the war path and dread
a winter’s campaign against them. which would
annihilate them if vigorously prosecuted. Gen Con
nor after giving them a good threshing is releived
and sent off some where else. It is the opinion
of everyone that they will break out again in the
spring unless more troops are sent into this country
than have even yet been sent here. The treaty will
suit me very well. for if compelled to remain
here during the winter I desire peace. so that I
can venture out after “Black. Tail” and other game
without the fear of getting an arrow through me.
No Indians have been seen anywhere along this
route for two or three weeks. at least no great
force of them. and but little fear is entertained
of their making their apperance again this
season.. One day last week the folks at Va Dale
were agreeably surprised by the return of a cow
that the Indians drove off from there a month
ago. It seemed that they had shot an arrow clear
through her in a part of the body that did not
prove fatal and abandoned her.
Havens Letter: September 17 1865 , Page: 5

Havens Letter: September 17 1865
Havens Letter: September 17 1865


I am well pleased to hear such
encouraging accounts of crops and prices from
you. and trust that you will make no foolish
use of the money you may receive. Watermelons
grow down on the Cache Le [Poudn?]. but I have
not tasted any this season and imagine they would
taste of “Greenbacks” considerable. as I hear they
sell readily for a dollar and upward each..
The only fruit I have tasted this season is such
as grows on bushes. consisting of raspberries. Choke
cherries. gooseberries. Huckleberries. and wild cur
rants. You should eat wild currant sauce
once. It is excellent. and the fruit grows in great
abundance in some localities near here. We have
a formidable rival in our love for these fruits. in
master Bruin who is a great lover and a voracious
eater. He is quite civil however. timing his visits to
the bushes so as not to interfere with ours. but there
is no mistaking the impression of his foot when
he has once “put it in” one of these patches. He is a
reckless. “cuss” and spares no bushes to procure
his food. I suppose Bill Wynn. and “Bin” Lee
will create quite a sensation at home. Glad to hear
they have returned safe. Remember me to both.
I suppose ere this will reach you. John Cowles

Havens Letter: September 17 1865 , Page: 6

Havens Letter: September 17 1865
Havens Letter: September 17 1865

and other boys of the “6th” will have reached
home. Remember me to John. as I consider
him the most worthy of respect of any of those
who have yet returned.. I have not heard any
more from Rene as yet. nor from any other
of our relations except my “cousin” Had a letter
from Newt Stephens a few days ago written from
Atchison Kansas and inviting me to make
them a visit on my return journey. Think I’ll
accept. for various reasons..
Three years ago I was just commencing
my first “bumming” in Uncle Sam’s employ
and I have kept on “bumming” ever since: think
it’s about time to quit. dont you? A man
sometimes “sells” himself in attempting to “sell”
some one else. So watch your dodges. and dont
fool with “edge tools” too much. A great many
things that look harmless. can send out a sting
that one will feel a long time.
My Love to all. Write often.
Your Brother
EA H
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