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Havens Letter: August 6 1865

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Creator: Edwin R. Havens
Subjects: Civil War, 1861-1865
Date: August 6, 1865
Format: Image/jpg
Original Format: Document
Collection Number: Havens Letter: August 6 1865
Language: English
Rights Management: Educational use only, no other permissions given. Copyright to this resource is held by Michigan State University and is provided here for educational purposes only. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the University Archives & Historical Collections, Michigan State University.
Contributing Institution: Michigan State University Archives & Historical Collections
Relation: Havens Letter: August 6 1865
Contributor: MSU Archives and Historical Collections
Havens Letter: August 6 1865 , Page: 1

Havens Letter: August 6 1865
Havens Letter: August 6 1865

Virginia Dale. Colorado. Territory
Sunday August 6th 1865
Dear Nell.
Another week has passed by with its
usual rapidity and changes of weather. wind and events
and I am again seated pen in hand about to issue
you another of my periodicals. as yet no letters
reache us. not a single. solitary line word or syllable
even from friends and civilization and I can not discuss
with you some question arising out of events chronicled
with in some of your letters.. and I must content myself
with some chronicling some of the events that have taken
place among the wild scenes of our present home.
With us all has been peace and quietness.. we have hunted.
fished. rode or remained at home as we chose to without
hindrance or molestation. and haveng passed a very pleasant
week indeed.. but some of our brothers above us. between
here and Fort Halleck have been less fortunate.
Havens Letter: August 6 1865 , Page: 2

Havens Letter: August 6 1865
Havens Letter: August 6 1865

Scarcely had a part of our command stationed themselves
above here at Little Laramie. Rock Creek. and Cooper’s Creek
on Wednesday last when they were attacked by between then
two and three hundred Indians who succeeded in running
off a part of their stock.. and wounding one soldier. and in
turn lost three or four killed or wounded.. They also attacked
a large migrant train killing two men. two women and wounding
two or three more. and driving off a part of their stock and
capturing and carrying off two women.. They say that our
boys fought them gallantly grinding off their “Spencer’s”
in real old Virginia style. and slightly surprising [illegible in original]
red-skins.. who have been so accustomed to doing everything
in their own way and at their own time. with all other
troops that have been stationed here before. These. Kansas
and Colorado troops have a more wholesome terror of
these Sioux. Cheyennes and Arapahoes than the most
timid “Dough Boys” ever had of his Honor Jack Moseby.
It may seem strange to you but it is nonetheless
true. that fourteen men fought their way before through nearly
three hundred Indians for more than half a mile with only
Havens Letter: August 6 1865 , Page: 3

Havens Letter: August 6 1865
Havens Letter: August 6 1865

one man slightly wounded. The Indians are all well armed
with good rifles. revolvers. bows. and arrows. and in some instances
spears. This is considered the safest place and the one least
liable to attack along the entire route. We have nearly 50
head of horses and mules at this station. which is quite an
inducement for them to attack us. yet we keep a strong guard
on the stock while grazing in the day times and haveng them
corralled in a strong enclosure with guards at night besides
we have. 20 men here. soldiers I mean. besides there are nearly
as many men connected with the stage company here. all
of them accustomed to such scenes and I consider that
we are perfectly safe. The Indians usually attack
either late in the afternoon or. after daylight early in the
morning at which times our men are always here. and
could get up quite a respectable little fight I imagine.
I can now speak understandingly of trout fishing and eating
after a weeks experience during which time until this morning
we have had trout from two to three times each day. My
experience in fishing has not been as satisfactory as in eating
Havens Letter: August 6 1865 , Page: 4

Havens Letter: August 6 1865
Havens Letter: August 6 1865

I have been fishing twice during the week. catching 15 in
both days. and not very good days for fishing either Two of
the men connected with the company here haveng extraordinary good
luck. One went out one day . was gone some two hours and half
and brought back 106. all caught with one hook. Mountain Grouse
or sage hens are quite plenty here. and I notice they make excellent
Pot. Pie. and as we have a splendid cook I guess we cant live. here.. O! no.
I think we’ll starve..! Don’t you pity us? eh!
in
I’m not ^ one of the best of humors this morning from
various causes. In the first place I’m slightly indisposed on account
of a good, big cold in my head which makes me considerably
out of temper with every thing and everybody and two captains
are laying back behind me. gabbing away sometimes slandering
brother officers and [illegible in original] over prospects in the future for promo
tions etc. then again discussing other subjects equally uninteresting
to myself.. Another cause is the condemned selfishness of one of the said
captains in regard to myself. Col Briggs returned from Fort Halleck
last night
on his way to Fort Collins ^ and brought orders for me to report to Maj
Darling at Fort Halleck. for duty of a special kind. much more
laborious and at the same time much more pleasure than the
duty here. But Capt. __ although having nothing in the world
for me to do here made up a pitiful story. and a sorrowful face
and finally induced the Col to countermand the order. If our
company were here and we had anything in the world to do
I would not have thought a word of it but here although it is
a very pleasant place and I can enjoy myself as I choose I have
not the congenial companions. I should have there as Co. “A” is stationed
there. and all my old associates are there. The only company I
find here is among the men. of the 1st. Capt Clark is no company for
me nor I for him. but he is one of those fellows that would’n’t
turn his finger to save the reputation. if not the life of his neighbor.
well having partially vented my spleen and whiled away nearly
an hour. I’ll quit. If I ever hear from you. I’ll write and
let you know. if I don’t I’ll manage to out live the matter
someway. If any inquires for me tell them I’m here.
When I hear from you again I’ll subscribe myself. your loving brother. till then
Ed
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